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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently bought a Casio Oceanus OCW-S100F-2AJF from Higuchi in Japan, and I wanted to share my impressions.

I could not find a lot of information about this watch when I was doing my research, and now that I have it I can share some first-hand information with other people who might be interested in it. Please feel free to ask questions, and I’ll answer them to the best of my ability.

What It Looks Like



Why I Chose It

I’m slightly obsessed with the correct time. I can tolerate my watch being off by a few seconds, but I’d always prefer it to be exactly right. I don’t like it when my watch is off by a minute or more.

I discovered this watch after seeing the Citizen World Perpetual AT, which seemed like a great traveler’s watch: always accurate and easy to change the time to your current time zone while maintaining the correct time at the minute and second level. The Citizen wasn’t quite my style but it led me to other models like the Citizen Exceed and Attesa, Seiko Brightz, Casio Lineage and Edifice, and ultimately the Oceanus. To me the Oceanus is the best of them all, since it has 6-band radio control and a clean design that doesn’t detract from telling the time. At $600 it was more than I would usually spend on a watch, but it wasn’t completely outrageous either.

What I Like About It

The best thing about it is that it should always have the correct time and date, without me needing to check and reset them. If I travel somewhere out of range of the 6 time transmitters, it’ll still be as accurate as a standard quartz watch for the few weeks until I get back, and thanks to the world-time feature I should be able to set it to the local time zone without changing the minutes and seconds. In the rare case that I travel to a time zone that isn’t supported (like Newfoundland or Venezuela) I can set it manually, but that’s going to be a very rare situation.

I like how clean the dial is. Most watches that offer this kind of feature set have large complicated dials, and I just don’t like that look at all. A salesman showed me a Citizen Skyhawk recently and told me it was a very popular model, but all that clutter seems to interfere with the function of telling time. This is a very low-key watch with a lot going on under the surface, and I like that.

I also like that it’s solar-powered, so I shouldn’t ever need to change the battery. Every time I changed my quartz watch’s battery, the shops would remind me that they could no longer guarantee its water resistance, so I’m happy to not have to open the case. In theory if you had it at a full charge and put it in a box where it got no light, it would drop to a “power saving” state after a week and stop moving the hands, but continue to keep the time internally for 2 years. When I took it out of the shipping box it was in the power-save state, and as soon as I opened the box and light hit the dial the hands spun around to mark the correct time again.

What It’s Like To Use

I currently live on the east coast of the US, and the time signal from Fort Collins, CO has better range at night. When I first picked it up from the post office, it had not been able to sync the time the previous night and I tried several times during the day to sync without success. However it did successfully auto-sync overnight that night and the next. The instructions suggest that you take it off at night and put it on a windowsill for the best reception, but I didn’t bother with that and kept it on my wrist. I’ve compared it a few times to atomic clock signals and so far it has always been correct to the second.

Changing the time zone is so easy there’s almost nothing to it. You just pop the crown out, the second hand moves to indicate your current time zone, you turn the crown to select the desired time zone, and the hour hand immediately moves to the new time. It takes a couple seconds to update the position of the hands, and the date will update as well if your new time zone is in a different day. When you push the crown back in, the second hand goes back to keeping time.

Watch-Tanaka has a nice video showing off the watch, and near the end you can see a demo of the time zone feature.

I like the lightness of the titanium case and bracelet, but I think stainless steel looks and feels better, so I have mixed feelings about the titanium. I have a few watches with steel bracelets and I don’t mind the weight--you get used to it very quickly.

Because it's basically a digital watch with an analog face on it, there's a precision to its movement that I like. For example, when the second hand reaches the top of the dial, the minute hand is exactly on its mark. When the stroke of midnight arrives, the date updates immediately, instead of slowly updating over a period of a couple hours like my other watches do. However, the minute hand doesn't move smoothly, instead it visibly advances every ten seconds--you can see this in the video above. I was a little put off by this at first, but I quickly got used to it.

Despite the technology behind it, it’s not very gadgety. It’s just a no-maintenance watch that keeps perfect time, with a perpetual calendar you never need to set, that powers itself via sunlight so you never need to change the battery. It doesn’t prominently advertise its features on the dial either, so anyone looking at it would assume it’s a standard quartz watch unless they looked very closely and saw the time zone markers.

It came with an English-language manual, but if you want to see the manual online it is available here:
http://ftp.casio.co.jp/pub/world_manual/wat/en/qw5235.pdf
 

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Thank you for the review and the pics. That's a stunning watch indeed. I agree I love how simple and clean the face is.
 

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I enjoy the simplicity and pureness of the design coupled with the fact it has tough movement and the solar (with 2yr capacity). Nice review!
 

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Great review. I've had my eye on this watch but was frustrated by the lack of information on the web. Your post helped fill in some of the gaps, so thanks for taking the time to do this.

Do you know the lug size?
 

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The lug-to-lug height seems to be 45.7mm according to online sources (and my measurements are similar), the lug width looks like 21mm by my measurement. Hope that helps!
Thanks very much for the follow-up! Enjoy the watch-- I think it's a great choice for travel or otherwise.
 

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These are solid links, right?
I can see that the outer ones are, but not completely sure for the middle ones.

A lot of you said that the face is clean, but it could be even cleaner without those city names. I don't need the World time function, but it's still not a deal breaker.
The OCW-S100-7AJF is as close to an Omega Aqua Terra with white dial and blue hands as they get.

OCW-S100-7AJF_2.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
These are solid links, right?
I can see that the outer ones are, but not completely sure for the middle ones.
Yes, the inner links are solid too.

A lot of you said that the face is clean, but it could be even cleaner without those city names. I don't need the World time function, but it's still not a deal breaker.
True, at least they kept the time zones on the outside of the dial. For what it's worth, though they seem obvious in the extreme close-up shots, on mine the time zone markers are so small in person that you don't see them unless you look really closely. If you look at the "wrist shot" I took, you'll probably find the time zone markers nearly invisible at a normal distance.

For me the world time function was a major wish-list item though, so I'm happy to have them there.
 

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True, wrist shot looks nice.
 

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Nice review !!

What is the diameter of the watch ? I've read from eBay offers it is 41.5mm but on your wrist it seems smaller...

Moreover what do you know about the scratch resistancy of the titanium from Casio ? For example Citizen does a surface treatment that they say very effective against scratches: what about Casio ?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
What is the diameter of the watch ? I've read from eBay offers it is 41.5mm but on your wrist it seems smaller...
41.5mm is correct. My wrist is about 7" around and I generally prefer watches under 40mm, but I made an exception for this one and as you say it doesn't look too large.

Moreover what do you know about the scratch resistancy of the titanium from Casio ? For example Citizen does a surface treatment that they say very effective against scratches: what about Casio ?
Hard to say since I've only had it for a month now, but I will say that some small scratches and wear patterns are showing up on the clasp and the part of the bracelet that rests on my desk when I'm working. So the titanium carbide treatment isn't totally scratch-proof, but certainly no worse than the steel bracelets I have on other watches.
 

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For example Citizen does a surface treatment that they say very effective against scratches
It is not. If it comes in contact with anything harder, like steel, there will be scratches.
I got scratches the first day, when I measured the watch with a caliper. I put plastic bag around the watch, but that doesn't help. So in future, I will try not to measure Titanium watches.
 

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I have the OCW-S2400-1AJF and it is a beauty of a watch indeed. Makes for an elegant dress watch. While I wished it had auto EL, I realize it would probably have added lots of unnecessary bulk.

Yours looks equally nice as mine.


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