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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

So I have gone and acquired my first Oris, a 43mm Aquis.
IMG_2766.jpg

I had the bracelet adjusted at the AD, and for whatever reason they didn't have the appropriate sized screwdriver to get the job done. They attempted to grind one down but had no luck and gave it to the watchmaker that they employ. I picked up my watch a couple of hours later and didn't think too much of inspecting the work. After all it was a bracelet sizing. But after a couple of hours I decided to look it over and do some admiring and I immediately saw that they really scored the metal around the screw holes. Also, about 4-5 screw heads are nicely gouged from someones complete lack of finesse. I am going to take it back first chance tomorrow (technically today) and tell the owner that it is unacceptable for anyone to have such sloppy work. Any opinions on what course of action I should ask from the AD? Replacement of the bracelet/swap for another piece/ simple buffing and replacement screws?

Sorry for the crappy iPhone pics, unfortunately they don't really show how obvious the scoring is. I'm a realist at this point with all my watches and I expect a good amount of swirls and surface scratches from daily wear, but I don't think this type of careless work is acceptable.
IMG_2761.jpg IMG_2762.jpg IMG_2764.jpg
 

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I would held whoever did the adjustment responsible, so in your case, I'd demand a new watch period. You just got it, they messed it up why would you even need to wait around for a new bracelet. New watch, end of of story. To an horologist, I would expect something such as re-sizing be one of the most basic service you do.
 

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It doesn't look that bad, but you have every right to demand a new one. If they offer just the bracelet, I'd come back with, "yeah, replace a bracelet when you can't even remove links? No thanks".
 

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If this wasn't so serious I would find the fact that an AD didn't have the correct screwdriver laughable. At the VERY least they should offer you a new bracelet but I see Robotaz's point about them setting about the Aquis with something sharp in their hand. I've had loads of Oris bracelets sized and some of the screw slots get a little damaged. It can't be helped but the key word here is little. Your Aquis is not acceptable IMO and it's up to the AD to correct the mess he made.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I went back to the AD and spoke to the owner who has been my primary contact for all my purchases. I pointed out the problem areas and he was pretty forthcoming. He apologized and put all the blame on the two employees who attempted to adjust the watch with the makeshift screw driver, rather than the watch maker who did the final adjustment. He didn't hesitate to place a new order for me and exchange my current watch. Overall I'm pretty pleased with the service that I received and I'm sure the individual(s) responsible for the screwup are going to be reprimanded for their mistake as the owner seemed genuinely irked.
 

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I went back to the AD and spoke to the owner who has been my primary contact for all my purchases. I pointed out the problem areas and he was pretty forthcoming. He apologized and put all the blame on the two employees who attempted to adjust the watch with the makeshift screw driver, rather than the watch maker who did the final adjustment. He didn't hesitate to place a new order for me and exchange my current watch. Overall I'm pretty pleased with the service that I received and I'm sure the individual(s) responsible for the screwup are going to be reprimanded for their mistake as the owner seemed genuinely irked.
If the employees were pretty nice, I'd feel somewhat guilty but AD in my area, I swear, if you walk in with sweats or shorts(I find it comfy), they look at you like you are not going to buy, these are the employees I dislike very much and would not care less if they were replaced. But like I said earlier, re-sizing should be very basic to a horologist and employees who are not hired as one should just stay away because it is not worth screwing up someone's timepiece. It is a inevitable they(in your case you) will come back and complain.
 

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Glad to hear that the AD sorted you out. Maybe he ought to invest in a decent set of screwdrivers while he's waiting for your new watch to come in.
 

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JEES!!! I even have the right screwdriver to remove screws(I own the same watch)!! The AD did the right thing. Make sure you check it before you leave, if you have them size it for you.
 

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It's great to hear that the AD stepped up and did the right thing. You'll have to wait a bit longer, but it will be worth it. That Oris looks great on your wrist!
 

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Mike's got a good point there. Get the AD to size the bracelet for you then check it before you leave the shop. That way you get a watch that fits you AND a bracelet that's not chewed up.
 

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... and if you ever adjust it yourself in the future, here's a tip. Wrap around the edge of the link and screw head with a couple of layers of masking tape, then pierce the tape at the screw hole with your screw driver and remove the screw. The tape will help keep the screwdriver centered, but, more important, if the screwdriver slips the tape will protect the link from damage. Too bad the staff at the A.D. didn't do this.
 

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That sucks, dude. My watchmaker scratched the bracelet of my new Tag, and mispunched a hole in my friend's strap. He also had some serious attitude issues.

Later on, I bought my own watch tool and now do all the bracelet and strap adjustments myself. Cheaper and I know I can trust myself.
 

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It's a pain following Brent's advice but well worthwhile since there are loads of people who didn't bother with the masking tape and have the scratches to prove it.
 

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I went back to the AD and spoke to the owner who has been my primary contact for all my purchases. I pointed out the problem areas and he was pretty forthcoming. He apologized and put all the blame on the two employees who attempted to adjust the watch with the makeshift screw driver, rather than the watch maker who did the final adjustment. He didn't hesitate to place a new order for me and exchange my current watch. Overall I'm pretty pleased with the service that I received and I'm sure the individual(s) responsible for the screwup are going to be reprimanded for their mistake as the owner seemed genuinely irked.
For a competent watch professional, it will be nothing to buff that damage away.

Great to hear it was resolved to your liking. Gotta love good customer service. Funny how "good" has to be attached to "customer service" these days, huh?
 

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As sticky points out, it might be a good idea to invest in some tools so that you can properly perform some basic service work. Of course the next part of the equation is having people that care enough to do the job well with the same tools.

Nice resolution to your issue, good to hear.

Living in a small town has me considering acquiring some basic tools myself. Great tip from Brent as well on do it yourself service.
 

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Like others have posted, buy a good set of screwdrivers so you don't have to let incompetent people ruin your watch.

Oris is known to use loctite adhesive on their screw thread at the factory making them difficult to remove for the first time, thus causing damage unless you have a quality screwdriver. Why they do this, I have no idea.

Some people will tell you to to heat the bracelet up with a hairdryer or dip it in boiling water to loosen the adhesive. I have not found these methods very useful.

The best method is to actually tighten the screw first. Oris leaves about 1/2 of a turn in the screw when they install them in the factory. It is easier to apply pressure and tighten the screw 1/2 turn to break the loctite, then back it out. It works great.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Like others have posted, buy a good set of screwdrivers so you don't have to let incompetent people ruin your watch.

Oris is known to use loctite adhesive on their screw thread at the factory making them difficult to remove for the first time, thus causing damage unless you have a quality screwdriver. Why they do this, I have no idea.

Some people will tell you to to heat the bracelet up with a hairdryer or dip it in boiling water to loosen the adhesive. I have not found these methods very useful.

The best method is to actually tighten the screw first. Oris leaves about 1/2 of a turn in the screw when they install them in the factory. It is easier to apply pressure and tighten the screw 1/2 turn to break the loctite, then back it out. It works great.
Any suggestions on a good brand? I have a bunch of small "jeweler" screwdrivers but I couldn't tell you to what hardness the metal is rated...

As for the loctite itself, acetone or super glue solvent could work to loosen up the loctite a bit before turning. The best way is to heat the screw itself so it expands, which will crush the loctite. Maybe a soldering iron with a long, skinny tip?

Also, update: still waiting for the new piece to come in. :roll:
 

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Bergoen are one of the best brands about but they're not cheap as you will find out on Google.

Re heating threads with Loctite on them. Another member said he had a good deal of success with a soldering iron - I just couldn't face doing anything so extreme to my watches.
 

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Any suggestions on a good brand? I have a bunch of small "jeweler" screwdrivers but I couldn't tell you to what hardness the metal is rated...

As for the loctite itself, acetone or super glue solvent could work to loosen up the loctite a bit before turning. The best way is to heat the screw itself so it expands, which will crush the loctite. Maybe a soldering iron with a long, skinny tip?

Also, update: still waiting for the new piece to come in. :roll:
Please don't take a soldering iron to your watch. Read my entire post again, especially this part:

The best method is to actually tighten the screw first. Oris leaves about 1/2 of a turn in the screw when they install them in the factory. It is easier to apply pressure and tighten the screw 1/2 turn to break the loctite, then back it out. It works great.
 
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