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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I found this listed in wristwatches this morning, and at 25 dollars del'd, it seems a good candidate for a beginning tinkerer, wannabe watch maker to begin. I figure it's probably a pretty simple movement to work on as compared to later, tinier and more refined models.

Looks like the right place to begin my education. I have one of this type that's a total piece of junk ... that I got in a junk lot, but the hinge on the case looks good and tight on this one, and the crystal is there. Looks like a good place to learn about staking and broaching.

Am I approaching this wrong? Seems like a pretty common trade grade watch to me.

JDT

 

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Vintage & NAWCC Forum moderator
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IMO, you could probably pick a better first watch to work on.

These sort of Swiss bar movements are fairly common, which is one point in their favor. On the other side of this, however, the quality all over the place, ranging from passable to not very good. Cylinder escapement watches(which this is) are somewhat difficult to handle, and are even worse to repair. These were largely hand fitted, and there are no replacement parts available for them.

Low-grade 16 or 18 size American watches tend to be a good choice for the beginner-both their availability and the availability of parts-plus the standard construction-are all points in their favor.

All of that said, you probably have $25 worth of silver, so it wasn't a bad buy for that price.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Ben ..... I thought it looked like a silver case too.

I was messing with a swiss fake last night for awhile, and the first thing I have got to do is get a proper set of tools, including magnifying visor.

Most of the "jewels" in that watch are little red "covers" and not jewels at all. I straightened out the hairspring (note: I know this should be replaced...but) and I got the balance working, but the anchor doesn't engage the click wheel. There's a ton of slop in that shaft. The clutch also doesn't work worth a hoot. All a part of the learning curve. The bezel was nearly impossible to get unscrewed, so (since the crystal is gone) I used 6 drops of gap filling super glue, around the perimieter of the bezel, on a piece of wood, hit it with accelerator, unscrewed the bezel and soaked it off of the wood with acetone.

The key wind will challenge me, especially if it's poorly made or really worn. If I can get it to make noise, I'll be happy. It's not a timepiece that I think I'd want to rely on. There are too many really good watches out there for daily use. Heck, today ... who needs a watch? I was just taking our brand new cuisinart coffee maker on it's maiden voyage and it has a clock on it. 2 feet to the left of it is a microwave with a clock on it, and 2 feet to the right of it is a range with a clock on it.

But at least the parts look a little bigger to me :think:

JDT
 

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I'd agree strongly with Ben. Whilst it is a good candidate for taking apart and putting back together, cylinders have a very bad reputation for simply not working even if all the parts appear sound.
 
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