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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would someone know which model was the first solar powered G-shock ?

A year and model number would be great.

Barring that, would I be right in guessing it's the first Raysman ?


Thanks.
 

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Hi Kpatt,
I've seen various timelines from Casio that report that the Raysman was their first solar G-shock.

I think that was the main idea behind the "Master of G-shock" series. To create vehicles to market some of the tricks that Casio wizards had learned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Resinbandit,
that's what I'd suspected from my own investigations but was a bit surprised that the first Raysman was 1998 (DW-9300BM-1T) yet Casio released the solar powered CL-301 calculator watch in 1983 ! Unless of course, I'm wrong about the date of the first Raysman.:-s
 

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Thanks Resinbandit,
that's what I'd suspected from my own investigations but was a bit surprised that the first Raysman was 1998 (DW-9300BM-1T) yet Casio released the solar powered CL-301 calculator watch in 1983 ! Unless of course, I'm wrong about the date of the first Raysman.:-s

You're welcome kpatt|>

I coulda have sworn that there were solar powered watches floating around before then too. So I'm also wondering why the delay?
 
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Thanks Resinbandit,
that's what I'd suspected from my own investigations but was a bit surprised that the first Raysman was 1998 (DW-9300BM-1T) yet Casio released the solar powered CL-301 calculator watch in 1983 ! Unless of course, I'm wrong about the date of the first Raysman.:-s

The engineering challenge was quite a bit greater for the watch. A calculator doesn't run 24/7, and people don't care if it shuts down in the dark. A calculator doesn't need to recharge a primary lithium power cell, it just applies voltage directly to a circuit. I think they had to wait for the reliable rechargable coin cells to appear before the Raysman could be created.

Casio did make a few previous watches with solar power, but those were the same as their calculators; they ran on a normal lithium cell and switched to power from the solar panel when light was strong enough. You ended up with a battery that still had to be changed, and I'm not sure it was even worth it in most situations since the yearly self discharge rate of a lithium cell is fairly close to the power you'd save switching to solar for eight hours. It helped a bit, but was no great savings, which is why the Raysman was such a big deal. Recharging a primary power source does what previous models did, recovers power lost from the self discharge, and allows fairly heavy use of alarms, backlights, etc...
 
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Actually, I should mention that those rechargable cells don't need solar. You can actually use them in your normal watches, too. For example, to replace a CR2016 with an ML2016, just obtain the cell, replace the CR2016, and use it until the backlight won't work anymore. (The screen will blank off when you press the light button, then come back on 2 seconds later - this means your cell is nearly dead.)

To recharge: Connect two alkaline AAA batteries in series with 500 ohms of resistance. Connect the + terminal of the AAA battery to the + of the ML2016, connect the - to the -. Leave for 12 hours. Put back into the watch. You're good to go for about another year and a half (assuming that you got 2 years out of the CR2016.)
 

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Actually, I should mention that those rechargable cells don't need solar. You can actually use them in your normal watches, too. For example, to replace a CR2016 with an ML2016, just obtain the cell, replace the CR2016, and use it until the backlight won't work anymore. (The screen will blank off when you press the light button, then come back on 2 seconds later - this means your cell is nearly dead.)

To recharge: Connect two alkaline AAA batteries in series with 500 ohms of resistance. Connect the + terminal of the AAA battery to the + of the ML2016, connect the - to the -. Leave for 12 hours. Put back into the watch. You're good to go for about another year and a half (assuming that you got 2 years out of the CR2016.)
Interesting! Thanks for the tip.
 
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