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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have had an Omega Seamaster 2531.8 for about 10 years, worn it everyday, beaten the mess out of it, and it has always stood by me. However, a couple of weekends ago I was doing my final check dive for certification, and though it had been fine on the 3 previous dives, while descending on my 4th and final dive I noticed water in the watch. As soon as I got home I cycled fresh water through it a few times using negative pressure to force the air out, and the next day I sent it into Omega service. I know exactly how it happened, a combination of 10 years w/o service and my need to check out the movement every now and then. Eh, it happens.

My issue now is OS quoted me $900 to replace the movement, which is less than the watches current value. I have knocked a few ideas around, from a full disassembling and thorough cleaning, to replacing the 1120 with a stock 2892-A2.

I've gotten a pretty nice set of beginners tools, and I am just waiting on my movement to start the first Timezone course. As I understand the second course uses the 2824, so I figured if I get into that one for the course, then at least I'll know my way around well enough to do a simple breakdown/cleaning on the 1120. This is a completely uneducated assumption though, fingers crossed...

I have been lurking on the forums for a few months, and figured that this would be a perfect time to recruit some advice from you guys. Thanks.
 

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Believe the 1120 is based on ETA 2892-A2, not the 2824. Swapping movements is definitely an option to save $$. You can purchase a new movement or a donor watch. Beware, Omega enthusiasts will never forgive you!

You'll run into problems with the stem height, overall movement height and the dial feet length if trying to replace 2892 with 2824.

Did the dial and hands survive the flood?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, billermo. You are correct, it is based on the ETA 2892-A2. Ive been looking at so many watches/options that they have all run together for me.

The hands and face looked ok when I sent the watch out, but that was a couple weeks ago and I haven't gotten it back from service yet.

As far as the enthusiasts go, if they want my Omega to stay "pure" then they can feel free to donate an 1120. I do love my Seamaster though...to death, apparently.

Is it unrealistic to think that the original movement can be saved? I know that that would depend on how far gone it is, but based on just a simple saltwater submersion is there anything that would keep it from being feasible? I can source a new 1120 for around $500, which I may do, but I would really like to keep it as original as possible. Any 2892-A2 swap I may do would be considered temporary, just to allow me time to sort out/refurbish the original movement.
 

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Swapping out for a base engine will make it into something of zero value, a Frankenwatch. That is if with your current level of experience (zero) you don't completely wreck it. Working on a well loved watch as your first project is really, really stupid. You say you can get an 1120 for 500. Less than twice that buys you new and factory fitted. Spend the money. Next time have it serviced.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Re: How bad does the movement look?

Got any photographs?
The only one I have is from right after it happened. It was still wet, even. It looks really bad, I know, but most(if not all) of the dis-colorization is from the migration of the lubricants, not corrosion. There was an even coat of the orange/brown oily gunk over the entire movement. If you look close you can see on the edges where I wiped it off. This happened weeks ago, so I am bracing myself for the worst when it gets back to me.



Tom, I realize that with another movement it completely looses its market value, but the only thing I care about is its personal value. I will never sell this watch. Its' pre-dunked condition would have only brought $600ish dollars, so I am certainly not going to put $900 into it just to get it back to $600. However, if I replace the movement and continue to wear it for years it is worth even more to me, as I would be the one to fix it.
I understand that you could be assuming that the sentimental value of the watch exceeds the $900, and it does, but the alterations wouldn't degrade that for me. This watch has been on my wrist every day for the past 10 years, this is just another chapter in a long book. :-!

I would also like to again state that I'm not sure exactly what I am going to do, that is in fact why I am here, to get food for thought. Thanks a bunch to all those that have responded.
 

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As long as omega didn't do something odd like move the feet locations or alter the date wheel (they do put thier paws on it), then do a 2892-a2 swap it will be just as good if not better since they have been known to be a cosc out the door movement. I am dissappointed to see they are using rustable parts makes no sense.
 

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As long as omega didn't do something odd like move the feet locations or alter the date wheel (they do put thier paws on it), then do a 2892-a2 swap it will be just as good if not better since they have been known to be a cosc out the door movement. I am dissappointed to see they are using rustable parts makes no sense.
The movement isn't intended to be submerged in water, and there aren't many options for highly corrosion resistant materials to make the pinions and springs out of. Pretty much all mechanical watches will be made out with some "rustable" parts, even the haute horlogerie stuff.

However, i think the movement swap would be the best economical option if possible without any modifications. Cleaning the existing movement would mean polishing all the pinions, which is no mean feat if you want to do it properly and simply not worth the costs unless you do it yourself.

I should add that, the movement could always be restored to like new conditions, but depending on how baddly rusted certain parts are, it would cost far more than a new movement directly from Omega, that's why they offered a new movement and not a restoration.
 

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Is it unrealistic to think that the original movement can be saved?
When this happened to my omega, one watchmaker reassured me that he could disassemble the movement, clean the parts in an ultrasonic bath, and reassemble. He did mention that some parts may need to be ordered depending on the condition.

In the end, I sent it to Omega for the fix.
 

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The movement may not be beyond saving but the longer it stays like this the worse it will get. It needs to dissasembled ASAP, cleaned and any parts that are rust affected either treated or replaced. What you don't want to do is leave it so the rust sets in to the balance staff and train parts particularly.
 

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My Seiko 6138-0040 bullhead chrono was at my watchmakers two years ago when his shop was completely under water during a major flood in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. My watch was in his safe with the back off. The fact that it was in the safe, at least kept the watch from disappearing. Another of my watches was on his bench, and was never found. Back to the flooded chrono. I sent it to Ken Setser, and he was able to disassemble, clean and oil it, and it is running as good as ever today.
 

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Dears,

One advise when you have flooded your watch:
GENERAL advise only...
1, if only moisture:
Pull out crown immediately, put watch with crown up on a heater. then to watchmaker. to fix the leaking problem
2, flooded:
Take to watchmaker immediately!!! if not possible:
remove case back, if not possible pull crown out.
Buy deminerilized water.
submerge watch completely, shake watch in the water to let most of the air out of the watch so it will be even more flooded.
take watch ASAP to watchmaker. INSIDE the bowl or jar with the deminerilized water...
It seems the opposite of what you think you must do but trust me it IS thé best thing you can do for your watch and your wallet as there are $$$ involved...... :-!

regards,
RJ van melle.

PS: if salt water: Rince it with fresh tapwater first, fill it up, shake it empty. do this three or four times before filling it up with the deminerilized water.........
 
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