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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It might seem stupid, but some of the watches I handle, even from fellow WIS have surprised me (in a bad way), and then I realized that many people still only wipe their watches with a cloth, but that is not enough if you wear a watch regularly. That made me make a video on how I clean my watches, and I used a friend of mines Bulova that he lent me for the frequency video, as it was gunked up beyond belief!!!
I hope you enjoy, and check out my other videos of which I hope to make more.

 

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That's pretty much what I do as well, and always get great results. My only caveat would be in regards to dress watches or anything without a screw-down crown, for which I would recommend using a moist sponge and Q-tips instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's pretty much what I do as well, and always get great results. My only caveat would be in regards to dress watches or anything without a screw-down crown, for which I would recommend using a moist sponge and Q-tips instead.
I don't think you need to worry about either, they can take it without problem, only remove the leather strap.
My SNK805 has no screw-down crown and is rated as only water resistant, but I swam and still swim with it and never had a problem.
The biggest problem is age, I would never do this method with a vintage piece or anything more than 7-8 years old without lubing the gasket.
 

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An important warning regarding the watches without screw-down crowns, or with older watches that have screw-in backs which use gaskets or "O" rings--DO NOT USE SOAP!!

Depending on the soap, it may contain silicants (oils) and other substances that are particularly good at penetrating seals, particularly older ones--you can search this (WUS) site for other threads about this fact, just as you will see most watch repair pros would NEVER use soap on any watches....water, soft tooth brush, jeweller's and Cape Cod cloths, cerium oxide and diamond paste...all OK (if used properly), but soap--NO WAY!!
 

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Instead of using soap, is it possible to use hot (>70[SUP]o[/SUP]C) water to flush grease/oils away? Or would those kind of temperatures also be damaging to a watch?

Edit: And thanks for showing this method, very useful!
 

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I have a couple of watches I use with sports, tasks that take some physical effort or hot weather. As the watches I use for that purpose are all with screw down crown I brush them with a soft toothbrush after every sweaty job/training, but without soap. As they get brushed at least once a week they stay very clean, as new, for years. My main reason for doing this every time is to remove salts from perspiration.

For non water resistant and/or vintage watches I use moist lens wipes (ment for glases and camera lenzes). As I only wear those in very moderate conditions I hardly ever need a toothpick to keep them clean. Those lens wipes do a great job cleaning incoming dirty watches btw.

So I agree with the TS that a high frequency makes a very easy job, and I find if the cleaning frequency is high enough you don't need soap at all.

One thing to ad: Be carefull not to rub to hard on a screw down crown in the unscewing direction. There is a remote chance you unscrew the crown if it turns easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
An important warning regarding the watches without screw-down crowns, or with older watches that have screw-in backs which use gaskets or "O" rings--DO NOT USE SOAP!!

Depending on the soap, it may contain silicants (oils) and other substances that are particularly good at penetrating seals, particularly older ones--you can search this (WUS) site for other threads about this fact, just as you will see most watch repair pros would NEVER use soap on any watches....water, soft tooth brush, jeweller's and Cape Cod cloths, cerium oxide and diamond paste...all OK (if used properly), but soap--NO WAY!!
I used to think that too, but like I said, I have been using this method for years on watches 13+ years old, and NEVER had a problem, but just to be safe, if you have doubts, use just water and a brush, as I think that will clean it as good as this method :)
 

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I've always used mild soap since my diving days. The worse is to let salty seawater dry on the watch thus allowimg salt crystals to form which will do far more long term damage to seals and O-rings with possible rust too. The same can be said for salt ridden sweat which can easily get into crevices like around the caseback before the O-ring gasket. I regularly allow my water resistant watches to soak several hours in plain clean water and occasionally add mild soap and carefully brush according to how much I've been using the watch lately.
 
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