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All my three Gs stated in my signature are all made in different countries. My Riseman from Thailand, Frogman from Japan and M5610 from China.

Honestly it's no big deal as they still function well and I still love them all to bits!!
 

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Talking about fog on the lens...

View attachment 873528

This was taken earlier today.

I received this GW-3500BD-1AJF about a week ago.

A bit disappointing for a watch this expensive.

Not the end of the world, though.

Case back says "JAPAN Y" and metal strap says "China".

So how long does the fog take to disappear ?
 

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The fog remained for about 45 minutes. I was riding a bike for 2 hours. My wrist was warm and the ambient air was around 32 degrees. I guess, due to the watch's thickness, the back and lens experienced somewhat persistent extreme temperatures.

My "Made in Finland" Suunto does not fog in similar conditions. However, it doesn't have nearly as many cool and useful features as my G-Shocks.
 

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The fogging problem wasn't new on WUS but it always remains mysterious, people say it's due to the regional climate where the factory is located but some Gs have this fogging issue while others don't.
 

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The fogging problem wasn't new on WUS but it always remains mysterious, people say it's due to the regional climate where the factory is located but some Gs have this fogging issue while others don't.

I think the models with a lot of empty space (air) inside the watch, larger models like the 9300 Mudman, are probably more likely to fog, bui I have seen it with small models as well. Similar to how a car's windows fog when you drive it in cold weather. G-shocks need defrosters! A hydro mod would take care of that problem as well, but then you have to deal with the expansion bubble floating around.
 

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The fogging is okay as long as it goes away in 5 minutes. I had fogging in my DW6600 when going from a hot to cold environment, but that went away after I opened up the back of the watch and changed the battery. The back of the watch was left open for a few hours and whatever water molecules that were inside the watch disappeared and went away. I haven't since seen any fogging and moisture in my DW6600 ever since I did the battery change.
 

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Any risk from the fogging toward the electronic components ?
 

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Search the forums for solution. I think some members have opened their watch ( carefully so any springs don't fall out) to "air out" the humidity in the watch. Usually this solves the problem. I recall reading where some have placed rice in a container, then sat the opened watch on top and then closed the container. The rice absorbs the moisture in the air. Just something to consider.
 

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Fogging is no good under any size or shape.... If it takes a long time for the fog to go away, definitely open up the watch and let the rice do the work - as mentioned in one of the posts above. But when you put back the case back, you have to make sure the gasket/seal is in its own groove and try to have all 4 screws tighten down evenly. What`s really important is the room temperature where all this assembling takes place. I found that 22 - 23 degrees C is ideal and I never had any short or long term fogging happen to any of my watches.
 

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If fogging is not good in any shape or form then why does it occur and why does Casio allow their G-Shocks to be manufactured in humid environments like that?
 

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If fogging is not good in any shape or form then why does it occur and why does Casio allow their G-Shocks to be manufactured in humid environments like that?
The fogging occurs because of an unregulated indoor temperature when the watch is being assembled. The G-shocks are rated to withstand 200 meters - or 20 ATM of atmospheric pressure and they can do that by being properly sealed. So whatever your room temperature is (lets say is 21 degrees C) when you close your watch, that temperature will get sealed inside. When you go outdoors and the outside temp is much warmer/humid then fog will form. The watch is not thermally protected from the huge and sudden temp changes therefore it just makes sense for the fog to form....
 

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So if the fogging is a "normal" thing, it "cannot" damage or harm any of the electronic components or the circuit board.
Do you agree?
 

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If fogging is not good in any shape or form then why does it occur and why does Casio allow their G-Shocks to be manufactured in humid environments like that?
Casio allows it because they sell relatively inexpensive watches that most people buy, then discard, and buy new one.

Stricter quality control would raise the prices...

Sent from my VS840 4G
 

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Casio allows it because they sell relatively inexpensive watches that most people buy, then discard, and buy new one.

Stricter quality control would raise the prices...

Sent from my VS840 4G
I agree with you about the higher prices with stricter quality control. But why do they claim that their G-Shocks are 200M water resistant when they can easily fog up? It doesn't make sense to say that a watch is 200M water resistant and allow it to fog up like that even at the current quality control methods that Casio is using. When you say that a watch is 200M water resistant it shouldn't fog up at all.
 

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I agree with you about the higher prices with stricter quality control. But why do they claim that their G-Shocks are 200M water resistant when they can easily fog up? It doesn't make sense to say that a watch is 200M water resistant and allow it to fog up like that even at the current quality control methods that Casio is using. When you say that a watch is 200M water resistant it shouldn't fog up at all.
Fogging has nothing whatsoever to do with it's water resistance. Once the back of the watch is sealed using the screws and gasket the watch is as advertised. They don't produce or service the watches in an airtight environment as that would be difficult. Rolex don't, Omega don't, Seiko don't, I see no reason why Casio should for a watch that is a lot cheaper. I've had all sorts of watches fog up but that was only when I lived in the UK and was moving between different environments ie: outside in very cold temperatures and into the house which was a warm temperature, it happens even with steel divers watches. It's just one of those things and it's not limited to G-Shocks. I have no doubt that the manufacturing environment can also play a role and some watches from Thailand will do it while others won't, the environment in most countries changes day to day and sometimes throughout the day as well so there are bound to be some watches that don't exhibit the same symptoms.

Most people who have the fogging have also said that the fogging goes away and the watch continues to operate fine, so I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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Most people who have the fogging have also said that the fogging goes away and the watch continues to operate fine, so I wouldn't worry about it.
I'm one of those people that you are talking about. I had my DW6600 fog up on me a few times in the past. The fogging would appear when I went from a warm to a cold environment.
Just 2 months ago in September 2012, I changed the battery in my DW6600. During the battery change, I left the back of the watch open for an hour or 2 to allow any moisture inside the watch to dissipate. Since I did this, I haven't experienced anymore fogging underneath the watch crystal in my DW6600 when I go from a warm environment to a very cold environment. Also, in the 3 years that I've owned this watch, I've been constantly getting my DW6600 wet every single day while showering, washing my hands and swimming in 3 different oceans around the world and I've never had any issues or problems with water leakage getting inside my watch. The gasket inside my watch has always been in excellent condition since I got the watch. When I changed the battery, I cleaned and then re-greased the gasket with silicone oil and resealed the back of the watch real good. I've been heavily using the watch in water mostly every day since I changed the battery and I haven't had any problems with fogging or with water leakage. My DW6600 is very reliable and very water resistant.
 

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Casio allows it because they sell relatively inexpensive watches that most people buy, then discard, and buy new one.

Stricter quality control would raise the prices...
Im not sure I agree with this statement. The G-Shocks are one of those watches that can be cheaply manufactured and still do what they are advertised that will do. The production set up of manufacturing a G-Shock have various quality
control steps from the start to the end... yes there are $20 Casio watches that have a 10 years battery and for those kind of watches it may make sense to just be discarded 10 years later and those watches are 50 or 100 meters water resistant and regardless of their low price, they ARE water resistant. I have never ever had a Casio watch - new or old - that fogged up on me. But...a screw on case back full SS construction Seiko did that. I had the Seiko replaced with the different one (same model) and that one was fine.
Making 100`s of thousands of watches on a monthly bases, it is difficult to have no errors and therefore there will be some watches that will fall thru the crack.
Here is a quick math... The new Casio plant that opened this year in Thailand has a projected output of 700,000 watches per month. How much error do you think there can be in such a high volume production? 1% ? 0.5%?
1% out of 700,000 equals 7,000 defective watches !!!!
0.5% is 3,500 defective watches !!! At 3,500 defective watches out of 700,000 that means 1 defective watch out of every 200... That means 1 watch out of 200 will have some sort of a defect that slipped thru and landed on your wrist.
Unfortunately, I don`t have any info on what Casio considers to be an acceptable production error but as you can see, even 0.5% error will result in thousands of defective watches.
 

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Since when did we agree that fogging is a defect ?
 
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