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I know a few people who were seriously considering it...

the watch, aside from a incorrect second hand, (an easy fix IMO) was a very, very, early production 15 Sturmanskie. And there are some interesting differences. Notice the lack of Geneva striping on the plates and bridges. It is not the earliest I have ever seen, but it is one of the earliest I have seen for at least 7 or 8 years that has come up for sale.

I hope someone here did get it.

I guess the days of these being consistently under $200 USD are gone.
 

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Re: I know a few people who were seriously considering it...

probably waiting for his packet before gloating about it to us :-!

I hope so too b-)
 

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Re: I know a few people who were seriously considering it...

Uhm, I am the buyer! :-d And I have a Pobeda with central second hand on the way too. The plan is to convince the Pobeda to donate its second hand to the Shturmanskie. The trick will be to find a good watchmaker willing to perform the surgery.

And thank you Strela for the valuable information you supplied before and after the deal. There are so many fakes on the bay, and I needed a second opinion before spending this much. :thanks
 

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Congrat!!!

.... I was watching since it first appear.... but did not click the "Bid Now"
It seems like this genre is not that "affordable" anymore.

Maybe I should start looking for another hobby.... maybe paperboard clock making???? hahahahahaaa.......

 

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I will post pictures when the goods arrive, anything can happen and I keep my fingers crossed...

While we are on the subject: If the successor pilot watch to the Shturmanskie 15J was the 17J and then the Strela, what was the predecessor? What did Soviet pilots wear during WWII?
 

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What did Soviet pilots wear during WWII?
I understand that they wore Type 1 pocket watch movements housed in removable 'wristwatch' cases.
Mark Gordon (whom we sorely miss) has several.
Ill-Phil has an example here: http://www.netgrafik.ch/infantry-watches14.htm

They were light-years behind the german flieger-uhr, but that was because the Soviet watch industry was just begining to find its feet at the time.

It is my understanding that they were considered too valuable to be left in the possession of the men who wore them, so they were required to sign out watches and return them upon completion of their tasks.
Of course my knowledge is far from perfect and I'm sure Strela, Shadow_RU, Phill or Mark (if he were here) could offer more and/or correct me.
 

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It has arrived!

I received a couple of highly anticipated packages yesterday!



The Shturmanskie (1950) on the left, and on the right the poor Pobeda (1955) that will donate its second hand. The Pobeda turned out to be nicer than expected and I feel a sting of guilt. So when the operation is done and the hands exchanged, I plan to donate the Pobeda to a fellow WUS'er. Your only commitment will be to put a strap on it and convince me that you will actually wear it, and post a picture of that in this forum. I will even pay for the freight!

I'll get back to you when it is ready. :-d
 

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Re: It has arrived!

Congratulations with this exceptional acquisitions :-!
 

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I understand that they wore Type 1 pocket watch movements housed in removable 'wristwatch' cases.
Mark Gordon (whom we sorely miss) has several.
Ill-Phil has an example here: http://www.netgrafik.ch/infantry-watches14.htm

They were light-years behind the german flieger-uhr, but that was because the Soviet watch industry was just begining to find its feet at the time.

It is my understanding that they were considered too valuable to be left in the possession of the men who wore them, so they were required to sign out watches and return them upon completion of their tasks.
Of course my knowledge is far from perfect and I'm sure Strela, Shadow_RU, Phill or Mark (if he were here) could offer more and/or correct me.
Here is mine:



At the end of WW2 the Red Army made a requisition of Glashutte watch factory, that was in the east of Germany.
The machinery and many not mounted pieces were brought to Moscow, to the 1 MCh3 factory, where a number of chronometer were made by the soviet factory, with Glashutte moviments and russian cases. After a little time, however, the production ceased - nobody knows why.
 

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Is there some description (here, in the Web) about the Gagarin Sturmanskie watch or why is it so special. Was it only for random that Gagarin took this one or has ist some extraordinary special features for that time?
 

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From Wikipedia (search on Poljot):

"On April 12th 1961 Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space. During his historic flight he wore a Shturmanskie pilots wristwatch (a transliteration of Штурманские which actually means "Navigator"). This watch was not specially commissioned for the flight, they were standard issue to all air force pilots at the time. The success of the mission however lead to the factory being awarded the Poljot (Russian: Полет) name in 1964."

So nothing technically special with the watch, but the popularity is rather from historical reasons. That, and the fact that not many of the said watches survivied until now. They were only available to the pilots and used in training and battle.
 

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Is there some description (here, in the Web) about the Gagarin Sturmanskie watch or why is it so special. Was it only for random that Gagarin took this one or has ist some extraordinary special features for that time?
We spoke a lot about Gagarin Shturmanskie here, on WUS. :-!
The only special feature I can see in Shturmanskies was hacking stop.
 

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Bad news, the watchmaker said the seconds hands are not compatible and cannot be switched. o|
I guess I will have to source a Sportivnie instead. Does anybody knows if I need any specific year or variation to ensure identical mounting?
 

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I am confused as to why the surgery failed. Please have a look at the movements. First the Pobeda from 1955:



And then compare it with the Shturmanskie from 1950:



I don't know what the movement is called, but to me they look identical. Maybe you can see something I don't? There are five years between them, could they have changed the standard for the hands during this time?

Until I understand what is going on, there is no point in sourcing another replacement hand. :-(
 

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Bump.

Did this issue ever get figured out? The drama is killing me.
No, I was waiting for input on this matter but so far not so much. :-(

I concluded that the movements are not identical since the Shturmanskie is hacking and the Pobeda not. So I decided to take my chances on a Sportivnie as donor this time. The problem is that they are rarely seen with 15J movements but I continue searching. If I knew that the 17J movement was compatible, it would be much easier.

I am impressed with the precision of the watch, it is running just a couple of seconds slow! A strap is in the mail so I might post better pictures soon.

PS. Did you guys see the other seemingly correct Shturmanskie that was listed at a fixed buy now price? It is removed now, I don't think it was sold. The price was steep and the dial was creatively decorated by a previous owner, possible the original owner.
 
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