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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This has probably been asked before. What's the easiest way to determine how much time my watch loses/gains? Is there a standard?
How do you even begin to measure it? I tried to set my watch to the exact time the USNO Master Clock has. But by the time
I push the crown for my watch to run, I would be behind/ahead fractions of a second. I have tried this so many times, I gave up and
decided my watch is +2.
 

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It's not difficult :)
Set it to a known accurate reference (obviously). be that an atomic reference, or the TV clock, or some internet clock, or even just a quartz watch/clock you might have knocking about..

If your watch hacks (i.e. it stops dead when crown is out) , just pull it out and wait for the minute to come round.
If your reactions aren't quick enough, then pull crown out at say 5 seconds past.

Don't get too hung up about it all, just set it near enough and enjoy it.
 

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This has probably been asked before. What's the easiest way to determine how much time my watch loses/gains? Is there a standard?
How do you even begin to measure it? I tried to set my watch to the exact time the USNO Master Clock has. But by the time
I push the crown for my watch to run, I would be behind/ahead fractions of a second. I have tried this so many times, I gave up and
decided my watch is +2.
It doesn't make much difference where the second hand starts at setting as long as you compare it to a reliable time standard from day to day. I use the GMT website.

When doing a time study you must have a consistent wear and wind pattern during the test period. Without a standard your testing will not be reliable.

If the results show the watch is too far out of specs, get it regulated. Here is the COSC link:
COSC - Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronomètres
 

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This has probably been asked before. What's the easiest way to determine how much time my watch loses/gains? Is there a standard?
How do you even begin to measure it? I tried to set my watch to the exact time the USNO Master Clock has. But by the time
I push the crown for my watch to run, I would be behind/ahead fractions of a second. I have tried this so many times, I gave up and
decided my watch is +2.
HAQ has the Cadillac of threads on this topic. More information in that thread than 99.9% of the population will want to know :)
 

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+2 seconds is sweet for an automatic!

I use my Citizen BM7080-03E for timing a mechanical watch. My Citizen is spot-on. I usually compare the time, down to the second, by checking both watches side-by-side when I get up the next day. Used that method to determine that my Orient black Mako was +8. Just one second out of COSC for a watch that is occasionally discounted to $98.oo

One second out of COSC. For the price, I was very happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all, gents, for your replies.
And that thread is a great reference, Mr. Moderator.

You all have a good weekend!
 

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I find my WAN2110 runs about close to 10 secs fast each day while my much cheaper quartz Seiko is deadly accurate, even after over a month.
 

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I find my WAN2110 runs about close to 10 secs fast each day while my much cheaper quartz Seiko is deadly accurate, even after over a month.
No surprise there. Just the nature of quartz watches. +10 isn't bad for an automatic. +10 would be horrible for a quartz. Heck, +5 would be pretty horrible for a quartz too.

If +10 is just a bit too much variation for your tastes (and yeah, +10 would bother me a bit too), just get it regulated by an independent watchmaker. An easy fix.
 

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No surprise there. Just the nature of quartz watches. +10 isn't bad for an automatic. +10 would be horrible for a quartz. Heck, +5 would be pretty horrible for a quartz too.

If +10 is just a bit too much variation for your tastes (and yeah, +10 would bother me a bit too), just get it regulated by an independent watchmaker. An easy fix.
It doesn't bother me much, just have to adjust it once every week. Perhaps the next time I send it in for maintenance, will get it regulated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have the same exact model, the WAN2110, that I was trying to measure.
It is a +4. Trying to measure it every day for 10 days in a row. I had problems with it after some months when it would stop but they fixed it.
 

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I've called my local LVMH agent today and was told that usually automatics have a tolerance/limit of +/-15 secs per day so my close to 10 secs per day is normal and need not to be regulated now.

Should I feel relieve or is there a cause for concern?
 

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Plus or minus 10 seconds is generally the high end of the acceptable limit. Plus or minus 15 is not acceptable and I never have heard any expert say it is. A good automatic can do better than that.
 

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Plus or minus 10 seconds is generally the high end of the acceptable limit. Plus or minus 15 is not acceptable and I never have heard any expert say it is. A good automatic can do better than that.
That's what I was told by LVMH. I suppose i'll just leave it as it is before sending it for regulation in future.
 

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Regulation is your choice. I put up with +6-7 for a year and a half on a WAN2111 and then regulated it. By consistant wearing habits, periodic winding and setting it off of your wrist in different positions to gain or lose a little it finally is where I want it. The last time a set the time was April 30th. Today on September 4 it is -3 seconds from perfect time.

Not all watches will do this well but it can be improved from the factory setting if you want to go to the trouble. If you are an amateur watchmaker like some of us you can regulate it yourself or have a pro do it.
 

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Regulation is your choice. I put up with +6-7 for a year and a half on a WAN2111 and then regulated it. By consistant wearing habits, periodic winding and setting it off of your wrist in different positions to gain or lose a little it finally is where I want it. The last time a set the time was April 30th. Today on September 4 it is -3 seconds from perfect time.

Not all watches will do this well but it can be improved from the factory setting if you want to go to the trouble. If you are an amateur watchmaker like some of us you can regulate it yourself or have a pro do it.
Thanks for the advice! I've no knowledge of regulating watches so will only have to let a pro do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
After 6 days of measuring, I have come to the conclusion that the US Naval Observatory Master Clock is -5.


Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk - now Free
 

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Most watches have about + or -15 seconds of regulation adjustment available from the factory. So if you want you could have it regulated down to almost 0 seconds provided your wearing and winding patterns are consistent. Actually -5 seconds is very tolerable if you want to leave it alone. Much better than + or -10 seconds.
 
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