WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Didn't Know what German Silver was, and I thought that any fan of ALS will find it interesting. Or maybe everybody knows this and is just me that didn't know. In any event here is an explanation of what German Silver is:

Lange is unique for their exclusive use of German silver for the movement bridges. Despite the name it contains no silver – it is a copper, nickel and zinc alloy. Traditional Swiss movements use brass with either a rhodium (silver) finish or gilt (gold) plating. Some haute-horlogerie brands (F.P. Journe) use 18k gold for their baseplates and bridges. German silver is a more rigid material and has better structural qualities, and does not need to be plated to prevent corrosion – the finish you see is the bare metal, which has a warm honeyed colour. Unfortunately German silver has an extremely delicate finish – any handling will show up. The only way around this is to assemble the movement and test it, then to take it apart again to clean it and touch up the finish, and then assemble once more. Thus the assembly time is double what it should be! It’s a testament to Lange attention to detail and uncompromising quality. They could rhodium plate the bridges and omit the second assembly phase, but then it wouldn’t really be the same. They are a small manufacture, not a mass-production facility; they pride themselves on taking the time to do things perfectly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,285 Posts
Wasn't aware either Jorge, thx for sharing. Just one more reason to love a Lange!!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: heuerolexomega

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,603 Posts
I acknowledged that about 3 years ago when i was about to pulling the trigger on my Lange 1, as time goes by the color of the 3/4 plate will turn into a honey like/gold color that resembles the color tone of the Lange gold rotor, this might be due to a natural oxidization over time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: heuerolexomega

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,824 Posts
I acknowledged that about 3 years ago when i was about to pulling the trigger on my Lange 1, as time goes by the color of the 3/4 plate will turn into a honey like/gold color that resembles the color tone of the Lange gold rotor, this might be due to a natural oxidization over time.
It took about 9 yrs for my first Lange to change into a golden tone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,318 Posts
Wow, very interesting. Love hearing about this sort of stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,571 Posts
MB Villeret also uses German silver

Lange is unique for their exclusive use of German silver for the movement bridges.
Thank-you for sharing this historic note. The Swiss watchmakers called their version of German silver "maillechort". It was more common in the 19th century; here in this 1874 Leschot caliber from Mrs Tick Talk's V&C pendant watch:

Watch Pocket watch Fashion accessory Jewellery Metal

If I may offer a correction to your initial statement that Lange is unique among contemporary Manufactures in offering German silver; in fact Montblanc Villeret also uses this alloy for plates and bridges throughout their Villeret 1858 collection. I had the great pleasure of touring their factory recently:

 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top