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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering if someone knew of some of the prominent German watch movement manufacturers today? While I appreciate German made cases with Swiss movements, it seems to me that there are at least a few German movements nowadays which are not restricted to in house watches such as Lange and Glashutte original.

I was unable to find any good info online so i thought I might see what WUS members know.

Thanks.
 

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ALS, Nomos, GO, soon Damasco
 
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I was just wondering if someone knew of some of the prominent German watch movement manufacturers today? While I appreciate German made cases with Swiss movements, it seems to me that there are at least a few German movements nowadays which are not restricted to in house watches such as Lange and Glashutte original.

I was unable to find any good info online so i thought I might see what WUS members know.

Thanks.
A. Lange & Söhne
Glashütte Original

Volker Viskocyl
Lange & Heyne
Dornblüth
Nomos (esp. the Tangomat movement)
Jörg Schauer/Stowa (experiments with an Unitas base, see my Baselworld report 2009 here on WUS)
Chronoswiss

Damasko is currently working on an inhose movement (for more info: search this forum)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A. Lange & Söhne
Glashütte Original

Volker Viskocyl
Lange & Heyne
Dornblüth
Nomos (esp. the Tangomat movement)
Jörg Schauer/Stowa (experiments with an Unitas base, see my Baselworld report 2009 here on WUS)
Chronoswiss

Damasko is currently working on an inhose movement (for more info: search this forum)
Great info Mike! Much appreciated. So I read that the Nomos Tango movement is actually based on another Swiss movement rather than being built completely from the ground up, have you heard anything about that? I suppose my best bet for entering the German market will be a Stowa seeing as the authentic German movements are all $15K plus. I may consider spending a bit more to acquire a Tangomat date however...
 
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...So I read that the Nomos Tango movement is actually based on another Swiss movement rather than being built completely from the ground up, have you heard anything about that?
I tend to not agree.

Once upon a time there was a Peseux 7001 which became heavily (not to say "completely" modified by the NOMOS watchmakers.

Even the plates are now made inhouse (you will find to NOMOS reports here on the German Watches Forum).







Prototype pic (by Nomos)



I dare to say it is in-house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I tend to not agree.

Once upon a time there was a Peseux 7001 which became heavily (not to say "completely" modified by the NOMOS watchmakers.

Even the plates are now made inhouse (you will find to NOMOS reports here on the German Watches Forum).







Prototype pic (by Nomos)



I dare to say it is in-house.
That is what I had heard, the Peseux movement. So now they do not base it upon that. I see now that they are a true manufacturer. And quite a bit less expensive than other Glashutte brands (GO and Lange). Thanks for the info!
 

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This will always come back to the question, "Can you modify a movement enough that it becomes something new?" Some people will disagree and say building someone elses design and modifying it is not the same thing as designing a movement in house and building it. I am one of those people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
This will always come back to the question, "Can you modify a movement enough that it becomes something new?" Some people will disagree and say building someone elses design and modifying it is not the same thing as designing a movement in house and building it. I am one of those people.
Exactly right. While I am new to WUS and to the watch enthusiast subculture in general, I don't believe watchmakers should claim to have invented a movement if they only modify someone else's. It is common practice for in house "enhancements" to base ETA, Valjoux etc, but this does not make them their own. In my opinion one should only proclaim they manufacture their own movements if they build them from scratch, as Lange does. Having looked at the movement of the Tangomat, I believe this is the case with the exception of the jewels (which Nomos states on their website). I thank Mike for sharing his knowledge as well.
 
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I was just wondering if someone knew of some of the prominent German watch movement manufacturers today? While I appreciate German made cases with Swiss movements, it seems to me that there are at least a few German movements nowadays which are not restricted to in house watches such as Lange and Glashutte original.

I was unable to find any good info online so i thought I might see what WUS members know.

Thanks.
http://www.dornblueth.com/

Dornblueth and Son have in house movements. they make the watch to order. read the history. nomos glashuette is your other option.
 

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http://www.dornblueth.com/

Dornblueth and Son have in house movements. they make the watch to order. read the history. nomos glashuette is your other option.
AFAIK, Dornblüth / Sons started out with modified Unitas movements ... not sure to what extent they are completely inhouse now.

FWIW, I don't see why a company should be credited with a superior inhouse movement , supposing - and this is really stretching the odds - that a first inhouse movement is necessarily technically superior to movements developed and refined over decades. :roll:

Traditionally, the Swiss watch industry (and likewise the German one) has been built on specialized companies buying parts and movements from other specialized companies ... the Stowa B-Uhren used Unitas movements, Laco used Durowe, Wempe used RT and IWC and Lange used their own movements. The perceived superiority of doing everything in-house is a secondary development.

If you want a watch with a maximum percentage of inhouse parts, Seiko is the way to go. ;-)
 

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Was not Durowe founded by Eric Lacher, Frieda's son?
So that we can say that Laco used an inhouse movement?
 

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Was not Durowe founded by Eric Lacher, Frieda's son?
So that we can say that Laco used an inhouse movement?
Presumably, but my point is that in the past "in-house movements" were a matter of convenience, not a sign of horological sublimation as they seem to be considered these days.
 

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From a ecomonic/management point of view a totally vertical manufacturing structure (ie entirely in-house) is horribly inefficient, unless you can produce on a huge scale.

This is the reason AS, ETA, PUW, Durowe, Unitas, Valjoux and all the small Swiss watch casing companies pushed into the US watch market, later had their movement being cased up in the US, then absorbed the remnants of the dying US watch industry. The dispersal of manufacturing assets made for cheaper production.

Seiko can have nearly vertical manufacturing of mechanical movements because the group as a whole is large enough. Seiko makes precision instruments, electronics, clocks and similar item, so the facility that makes tiny gears can run at full tilt year round. The same is true for the all the other components of a watch, as many of their other products share technology. They can even forge titianium efficiently, as their sport equipment also use forged Ti products (golf clubs for one).

A watch manufacturer that produces 50,000 watches a year, and wishes to make its own movements vertically, could run a gear cutter about two weeks and have enough gears for the years. Not very efficient use of a machine that cost several million dollars.

Then their is the workman training problem. Which workman is less prone to make errors due to training? One who runs a machine 8 hours a day, 40 hours a week, 48 weeks a year, or a guy that works a machine for two weeks and the next time he sees the machine is two years later?
 

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I was just wondering if someone knew of some of the prominent German watch movement manufacturers today? While I appreciate German made cases with Swiss movements, it seems to me that there are at least a few German movements nowadays which are not restricted to in house watches such as Lange and Glashutte original.

I was unable to find any good info online so i thought I might see what WUS members know.

Thanks.
hi schumacherfan the A LANGE & SOHNE watch company made a 65mm diameter watch called WAFFEN SS in world war era and was sold for 20000 british pound at auction.they are 1 if german best watch movement and watch manufacturrers.thank you.:)
 

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Tangomat, I believe this is the case with the exception of the jewels
I believe NOMOS nowadays quotes 95% of parts as in-house manufacture. They still purchase the rubies, leather straps, and incabloc shock protection.

I know Glashütte Original claims 95% of parts as in-house manufacture because I toured their factory last week.

With regard to the comment that a 50,000 unit manufacture could make all of certain parts in two weeks: this may be true. But last week I saw how they make the teeth of wheels at G.O. and they do it in batches of 10: A technician puts 12 unteethed wheels on a spindle, sets the machine which cuts each tooth one by one (on 12 wheels at the same time). The tech then takes out the spindle, throws away the 1st and the last wheel, and checks the 10 survivors for quality. I don't think he can make very many wheels in a single day.

At NOMOS, if I understand correctly, the tooth-making machine makes only 5 wheels per batch. Their goal, if I recall correctly, is to make 20,000 watches/year by the end of 2010.
 
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