WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How does one become a watchmaker? Do you try to become an apprentice, do you buy tools and books and figure it out yourself, or go to a school? I know theres a person who does clock repairs in town would that be a place to start?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
Watch making and clock making while related are different. A clock maker does, in fact spend part of his time making clock parts. A watchmaker is more like an automobile mechanic:find the error and replace. There is also the difference of scale.

If you are really interested, I would recommend watch school which can be from two to four years, depending on the school and country you are in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,315 Posts
If you're in North America, I'd suggest starting with your local public library. You might also check to see if there's a nearby chapter of the the NAWCC (National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors). Or even just a member who lives nearby. Most chapters have a media library that members can sign out that includes not only books, but also videos and old school lessons. Some other countries have similar societies (the british horological institute, for example). Here's a link to a page of links:
http://www.horology.com/ho-membr.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
I would also try doing some repairs on junkers yourself with the aid of watch repair books from the library. I've been having good luck self teaching and can now do the things I set out to do such as fit movements into the cases I make myself and fix my own watches. I've also done some repairs for money at my jewelry store. I also formed a relationship with a certified watchmaker who can handle things that are too valuable or over my head. Much of the difficulty in watch repair is just being able to procure the right parts and this in itself is a key part of the trade knowledge. By self teaching you may find that you are content just being a hobbyist rather than a full fledged and certified watch maker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I know where I can lay may hands on around a thousand wind ups in need of repair. But where would I get parts? Also what are some tools I'll need? I'm really only interested in Bergeon tools and have seen some on Amazon.com. I'm thinking to start maybe a set of screwdrivers, tweezers, 7x loupe, Wenger minator, watch case back opener, and, oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I know where I can lay may hands on around a thousand wind ups in need of repair. But where would I get parts? Also what are some tools I'll need? I'm really only interested in Bergeon tools and have seen some on Amazon.com. I'm thinking to start maybe a set of screwdrivers, tweezers, 7x loupe, Wenger minator, watch case back opener, and, oil.
I personally think it's better if you learn to make parts first then start with replacing them. That way you have a much greater understanding of what exactly you're replacing and how it was made or how it can be made. Plus it's sometimes almost impossible to find parts of older watches and i don't just mean antique pieces, but some watches from just 50 years ago are hard to find replacement parts for because no one makes them anymore.

Obviously it would make sense to replace a part rather than make one if the part is available because of costs, but you're not really in the business yet, so i think you should be learning how to use a watchmakers lathe first.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top