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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I have been looking for a new watch and was considering grey market / Authorised Dealer.
I went AD and very glad I did, I picked my watch up all was good set the time to my IPhone and off I went.
After a couple of hours I noticed it seemed to be running fast, after a 24hr period the watch had run fast 7hrs!!!
I rang my AD and they arranged an immediate changeover for another one, had this happened from an overseas grey market place it would have taken much longer to get a result.

Anyway enough of that, now I'm wondering has anyone had a new watch gain/lose more than mine in a 24hr period? I'm guessing it could e a long shot but I'm happy to be surprised :)
 

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With my Omega AT 8500, there was a strange spec on the dial so I returned it to the AD. The staff insisted that I return it for warranty. So I did. Six weeks later I got my AT back with a brand new dial. I am thankful that I bought my watch through an AD.
 

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AD's and pre-owned are the only way I buy.
I'd rather buy grey than pre-owned (depending on the grey dealer); Amazon, for example, offers warranties; pre-owned will rarely accept returns for DOA, let alone faults in developed down the line.
 

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I'm not convinced that either of these stories would have turned out any worse with a gray market dealer.
 

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For me it depends on the price of the watch. Once you start laying down some cash I want to know it's authentic. For the adorables I have no problem going gray market.
 

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I'm wondering has anyone had a new watch gain/lose more than mine in a 24hr period?
I had something similar happen to me. Brand new, grey market Seiko purchased on Ebay, showed up gaining between 2-3 hours in a 24 hour period. The seller told me to send it to the authorized service centre in my country. After talking to them on the phone it became apparent that they likely wouldn't service it, even with a stamped warranty card. Plus it would cost a little over $30 to send it there and back, which the seller didn't seem interested in covering. When told they probably wouldn't deal with it, seller told me to send it back to him, he'd get it fixed and send it back. The seller didn't seem willing to pay for the cost of shipping the watch back to him either, and in correspondence completely ignored every request about it. My thinking was I had paid an agreed upon amount of money for a functioning watch and shouldn't have to pay additional money to get what I'd purchased in the state it was supposed to be in.

In the end I had to go through Paypal and return the watch. I was out of pocket about $40 for return shipping, and the seller went nuts when he found out I was returning it. I went and purchased a replacement watch, again through Ebay, different seller. I paid about $50 less for it because it came without papers and without a stamped warranty card (which I now understood to be without value). The replacement keeps time within about 30 sec a day. Not perfect, but close enough, and I can always try regulating it.

The whole thing was a big hassle, but even factoring in the return shipping to the first seller, I spent at least $150 less on the watch than I would have at an AD.

The next watch purchase I made after this was from an AD, and I remember thinking: "it sure is nice to know that if anything goes wrong with it I can walk in tomorrow and have it dealt with." But this watch was heavily discounted, and including taxes I paid slightly less than the lowest price I could find anywhere online.

I don't think you can say you're always better off with an AD or always better off going grey market. You have to take each purchase on a case by case basis. With a watch that's unlikely to have movement damage during shipping, or run fast/slow (quartz), I'd be more inclined to go grey market. Same for a watch that's fairly inexpensive. For any watch I'm paying $500+ for, I'd definitely go to an AD.
 

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I don't get it.

Why not buy from a reputable grey market dealer and just return it for a refund or exchange if there is a problem? Oh wait, you mean some ebay geek in Hong Kong, not just some grey market dealer. That's your problem.
 

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Oh wait, you mean some ebay geek in Hong Kong, not just some grey market dealer. That's your problem.
Those eBay geeks are safe, too. As you always should, you take your purchase to a reputable watchsmith to authenticate it and verify that it is running well. If it's fake or running poorly (and the auction presumably noted neither of those things), then a note from the watchsmith is all that it takes for eBay for force a full refund for "Item not as described."

It's really very difficult to have meaningful problems through eBay. I wouldn't buy from a sketchy auction just to avoid wasting my time, but the buyer protections are actually stronger than the legal protections a consumer gets at a brick-and-mortar store.

eBay is a ..... for sellers because of all those buyer protections, mind you. I'm not sure I'd bother selling a watch on eBay -- too many fees, and too great a chance that a crazy or malicious buyer can screw me over.
 

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I'm not convinced that either of these stories would have turned out any worse with a gray market dealer.
Exactly.
Except you'd have 10-20% of the purchase price still in your wallet plus the sales tax.
 

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Those eBay geeks are safe, too. As you always should, you take your purchase to a reputable watchsmith to authenticate it and verify that it is running well. If it's fake or running poorly (and the auction presumably noted neither of those things), then a note from the watchsmith is all that it takes for eBay for force a full refund for "Item not as described."

It's really very difficult to have meaningful problems through eBay. I wouldn't buy from a sketchy auction just to avoid wasting my time, but the buyer protections are actually stronger than the legal protections a consumer gets at a brick-and-mortar store.

eBay is a ..... for sellers because of all those buyer protections, mind you. I'm not sure I'd bother selling a watch on eBay -- too many fees, and too great a chance that a crazy or malicious buyer can screw me over.
This right here is the absolute truth. I've sold many things over eBay, and I swear, the worst thing about it is the fact that eBay fails to recognize the sellers as being their customers too, not just the buyers. While I do understand the concept of buyer protection, its SO easy for a crooked/dishonest buyer to screw you over.
 

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I don't have any hard stats, but I swear I've read more stories about duds coming from ADs than from gray market. They exchanged the watch for another one, like any good gray market dealer would do. Don't see the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I guess I just have more confidence with a bigger purchase from an AD in the sense that when there is an issue I can go to the actual store, speak to someone face to face and have my problem resolved rather than have to email someone and hope for a response. I have bought watches through grey market dealers before with no problems whatsoever however in this instance I was very happy in the way the AD resolved the issue so quickly.
 

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This right here is the absolute truth. I've sold many things over eBay, and I swear, the worst thing about it is the fact that eBay fails to recognize the sellers as being their customers too, not just the buyers. While I do understand the concept of buyer protection, its SO easy for a crooked/dishonest buyer to screw you over.
I bought nearly everything from eBay and got a problem with the product sometime. Most of the time the seller think that I'm crooked/dishonest buyer and think that there are nothing wrong with their product. I really hate those sellers, come on I paid for it without seeing the real product that I'm going to get, there are no way I can check it before I pay and their job is to make sure that the product is perfect before they send it off to me. Every time when there is a problem there are 2 choices, pay for the return fee (20%-60% of the cost of product) or keep that poor thing and move on... and for the sellers they just get their product back and re-sell it.
 

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Every time when there is a problem there are 2 choices, pay for the return fee (20%-60% of the cost of product) or keep that poor thing and move on... and for the sellers they just get their product back and re-sell it.
Except... those aren't your choices. If a product is inaccurately listed, you are always entitled to a full refund on eBay, and it's very easy to make this happen even if the seller doesn't agree.
 

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I can get full refund I know that but it's very expensive to post it back ($35 or much more for overseas) and in the end I got nothing.
 

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I can get full refund I know that but it's very expensive to post it back ($35 or much more for overseas) and in the end I got nothing.
If the item is not as described, you also aren't on the hook for return shipping. You can get a full refund from eBay, and it's up to the seller to arrange prepaid postage if he wants his item back.

I mean, none of that applies if you just don't like the item when you get it. But, if you're really feeling that there was something inappropriate about the listing, you DON'T have to just accept what the seller tells you in order to get the refund. eBay has these protections specifically for situations like this so that buyers don't end up losing money when the problem is the seller's fault.
 

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If the item is not as described, you also aren't on the hook for return shipping. You can get a full refund from eBay, and it's up to the seller to arrange prepaid postage if he wants his item back.

I mean, none of that applies if you just don't like the item when you get it. But, if you're really feeling that there was something inappropriate about the listing, you DON'T have to just accept what the seller tells you in order to get the refund. eBay has these protections specifically for situations like this so that buyers don't end up losing money when the problem is the seller's fault.
Nah you do, Paypal always tell me that I have to pay s&h for return, only one time I can keep the product and got full refund was the fake fragrance.
 
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