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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, my watch says Swiss Made along the bottom of the dial. The movement is a Swiss ETA 2824-2 which, I assume, is made in Switzerland. But what about the rest of the watch? Is the entire watch made in Switzerland? I ask only because about a year ago I made the decision not to purchase anymore Asian made watches, especially Chinese, and I'd like to think I'm holding true to that decision.

Thanks for the info.
 

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Like any complex product of any type, the parts, fasteners, sub-assemblies are usually provided by suppliers, and those can come from anywhere in the world. For example, I'm sure Glycine doesn't make its own screws, lume and certainly not movements. They buy those from suppliers, who buy parts from suppliers, who buy parts from suppliers...making it very difficult to trace the supply chain and know for sure.

That being said, I feel confident Glycine watches are about as "Swiss Made" as you're likely to find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Like any complex product of any type, the parts, fasteners, sub-assemblies are usually provided by suppliers, and those can come from anywhere in the world. For example, I'm sure Glycine doesn't make its own screws, lume and certainly not movements. They buy those from suppliers, who buy parts from suppliers, who buy parts from suppliers...making it very difficult to trace the supply chain and know for sure.

That being said, I feel confident Glycine watches are about as "Swiss Made" as you're likely to find.
Gotcha. I wasn't so much concerned about the screws and such but more interested in the case, dial, etc. I do understand about Swiss laws and what exactly constitutes "Swiss Made" but am hopeful that, in the case of Glycine, it means more than just being assembled in Switzerland.
 

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Gotcha. I wasn't so much concerned about the screws and such but more interested in the case, dial, etc. I do understand about Swiss laws and what exactly constitutes "Swiss Made" but am hopeful that, in the case of Glycine, it means more than just being assembled in Switzerland.
Actually, with Glycine, I'd guess it is more or less "assembled in Switzerland". Besides their movements (I wonder what they're going to do now that the ETA pipeline is going dry?), I'm guessing they buy their hands, faces, crowns and straps from suppliers? Possibly even cases...
 

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According to a trade journal a few years ago, all Swiss watches under about $2500 retail are in Chinese cases and with Chinese bracelets. This true for some individual brands in the higher price ranges as well. In addition to China, India also supplies watch components to the Swiss industry. The determination as to whether a watch contains sufficient Swiss content to be labeled "Swiss Made" is dependent upon the valuation of the content. Considering labor costs in China and India compared to those in Switzerland, the manufacturers can put a substantial portion of Asian components in a watch without the valuation of such components exceeding the limit set in order to qualify for the Swiss Made label. One supposes that every part except the movement could be Asian and still qualify as Swiss Made.

The hard truth is that if one wishes to have a truly Swiss watch, one should buy vintage.

James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
 

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I’ve discussed this subject, I.e., watches without Chinese parts, with another on this forum. If he wishes to out himself he can do so, but I can’t mention his name, out of respect. We know only three things: Rolex, Tudor in-house, and Grand Seiko have no Chinese parts. As early as the early 90s, omega was known to be using Chinese parts. If Omega was, guess how many others were? I would bet the vast majority use Chinese parts, whether they know about it or not.

If any brand came out with no Chinese parts at a somewhat reasonable price (sub-1000 USD), dollars to donuts they’d have a huge clientele. The three brands above are on the expensive side.
 

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The hard truth is that if one wishes to have a truly Swiss watch, one should buy vintage.
Or pay accordingly. You mentioned a $2,500 threshold. I don’t know s**t from shinola here, but I’d wager $2,500 is still too low. I’d maybe triple or quad that number. Rolex is probably the least expensive way to ensure 100% Swiss made, aside from maybe some oddities and outliers. But again, I’m shooting from the hip here. I’m just skeptical and don’t care where a watch is made as long as I’m not being fed a line crap or fleeced and the watch is inline with its price.
 

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Glycine was always a small company, they never made movements, cases, dials etc...but just assembled there. In 1953 all their suppliers were Swiss, today not anymore.

Again, the idea that a Swiss watch must be made of 100% components made in Switzerland is plain silly today, unless you spend something in the five digits range.
 

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At least the movements are Swiss?
 

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I’ve discussed this subject, I.e., watches without Chinese parts, with another on this forum. If he wishes to out himself he can do so, but I can’t mention his name, out of respect. We know only three things: Rolex, Tudor in-house, and Grand Seiko have no Chinese parts. As early as the early 90s, omega was known to be using Chinese parts. If Omega was, guess how many others were? I would bet the vast majority use Chinese parts, whether they know about it or not.

If any brand came out with no Chinese parts at a somewhat reasonable price (sub-1000 USD), dollars to donuts they’d have a huge clientele. The three brands above are on the expensive side.
Watches without Chinese parts may not be the ideal. Watches without Asian parts may be a better definition, since we know that other parts of Asia also supply parts to the Swiss industry. I believe there is assembly labor outsourced by the Swiss industry as well to various Asian countries.

Simply because an article is made in China does not indicate that it is of poor quality. The Chinese manufacturers are as capable as anyone else in the world of making quality goods. Granted, they make a great deal of trash, but that only because the world will buy cheaply made goods. My carbon fiber framed bicycle is clearly made in China, as are almost every brand of carbon fiber framed bicycles, yet, if the bicycle is sold from a bicycle shop in the U.S. (and one supposes the rest of the world) it has a decal on the frame stating "Made in Italy". This is a very high quality bicycle, a brand ridden by the world's best professional bicycle racers. The point is that the Chinese, through experience and having skilled labor, are very well qualified to make carbon fiber bicycle frames.

While a moderately priced, truly Swiss made watch might appeal to a certain group of aficionados, it is my belief that the watch buying public is swayed by slick advertising not truth in marketing. It is a Swiss watch, it is wonderful, who will tell them the content is mostly Asian? Certainly not the Swiss industry, and not likely the general news media either since they are recipients of the money for the slick advertising. It is my opinion that the public doesn't know and doesn't care to know about who actually makes their Swiss watches. It is all about conspicuous consumption.

Omega? In terms of sales revenue, Omega is second only to Rolex. My opinion is that Omega is an ETA with perlage. You can put lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig. Vintage Omegas are wonderful watches, and for years the brand was more desirable than Rolex. However, under the SWATCH Group ownership, the quality has declined. They are still trading on the reputation built by Omega pre-SWATCH. Perhaps at a point in the distant future, the consumers will figure it out.

James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
 

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Or pay accordingly. You mentioned a $2,500 threshold. I don’t know s**t from shinola here, but I’d wager $2,500 is still too low. I’d maybe triple or quad that number. Rolex is probably the least expensive way to ensure 100% Swiss made, aside from maybe some oddities and outliers. But again, I’m shooting from the hip here. I’m just skeptical and don’t care where a watch is made as long as I’m not being fed a line crap or fleeced and the watch is inline with its price.
No argument from me. In my post, which you quoted partially, I also wrote this, "This true for some individual brands in the higher price ranges as well." There are well known brands in the $10K to $12K range using Chinese made cases. The true talent of the Swiss industry is their marketing skill.

James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Interesting...replies to something I wrote 5 uears ago. I haven’t been active on Watchuseek for almost a year.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Interesting...replies to something I wrote 5 uears ago. I haven’t been active on Watchuseek for almost a year.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
We’re a bunch necrophiliacs.
 
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