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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

This is my first post here, so thank you in advance for any help this community can offer. My daily watch is an Omega Speedmaster, and my father, knowing that I prefer manual-wound, recently gave me this Cyma watch which had belonged to his father. Could someone help to identify this model maybe? All we know is that it was bought in Spain circa 1960, maybe earlier.

Unfortunately the watch has been broken for some time. When I try to wind it, the crown rotates maybe 1/8 of a turn with some spring resistance and then doesn't move further. Can anyone recommend somewhere for repairing this? I am based in Boston for the next few months and saw Cyma's US service partner is based in NY. I wonder if that may be expensive, but given the age of this watch, is that likely to be my only option?

Since this belonged to my grandfather, who died before I was born, this does have enough sentimental value for me to invest in repairing it.

Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Fashion accessory Jewellery
 

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Lovely watch - classic design never goes out of style.

Any independent watchmaker should be able to handle the diagnosis and servicing of your watch. The factory service center will likely be more expensive and although I have no direct experience with them - don't always have the best reputation.

The symptoms that you describe are consistent with a watch which is fully wound but for some reason has not put the balance into motion. This could be the result of something as simple as old oils gumming up the works or as complicated as a bad balance. A watchmaker should be able to make a quick determination and would be able to handle whatever is going on.

Let us know how it goes.
 

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I wouldn't entrust the watch to Cyma themselves- the current Cyma company is just a trademark, under which a new company (making rather distasteful watches with quartz and generic Sellita mechanical movements) has been built. The original Cyma company went belly up decades ago. The current one most likely has as much experience with vintage Cyma watches as Nickelback with hard rock (read: they haven't got a clue). Have the watch serviced by an independent watchmaker.
 

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I agree with the early 1950s being a plausible dating for this watch- the numerals and hands look quite similar to those used by Doxa and Tissot at that time.
Indeed a picture of the movement would help a lot.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi everyone,

Thanks for your thoughts on this - I have just left it with an independent watchmaker, and will post back soon with photos of the movement (and hopefully my fixed watch!). His initial thought was early 1950s as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks again to everyone for the input, I now have the watch back, and in working order! Here's the movement:
Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Fashion accessory Strap

I am trying to identify it, so I searched through all the Tavannes/Cyma movements on a website called RANFFT (It seems because I am a new member with low post count I am not allowed to post the link)

I didn't find an exact match to mine, but to my inexperienced eye, the most similar one seems to be the Cyma 574 or 576 (again, I'm not allowed to post the link, googling "cyma 574 movement" will take you right there...)

If indeed my watch movement is a similar age as the Cyma 574 or 576, then it would also date to ca. 1940. as James A suggested. Plausible?
 

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https://www.watchuseek.com/f11/how-find-watchmaker-near-you-3433002.htm

Agree with mkws, take a look at this forum sticky....

Edit - oops just read to the end, congrats! Nice watch.

I wouldn't entrust the watch to Cyma themselves- the current Cyma company is just a trademark, aunder which a new company (making rather distasteful watches with quartz and generic Sellita mechanical movements) has been built. The original Cyma company went belly up decades ago. The current one most likely has as much experience with vintage Cyma watches as Nickelback with hard rock (read: they haven't got a clue). Have the watch serviced by an independent watchmaker.
 

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Almost certain to be 1940s - later watches tend to have the 'C' logo on the dial whereas earlier ones just have the CYMA name (I'm not sure exactly when they started to add the 'C' but I'd guess around 1950 based on others that I own or have seen - plus the Tavannes markings on the ratchet wheel is normally only seen on the earlier watches. Lack of a movement number stamped somewhere is fairly unusual in my experience (which again may support an earlier watch), though in your movement pic there looks to be something stamped under the balance wheel?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Almost certain to be 1940s - later watches tend to have the 'C' logo on the dial whereas earlier ones just have the CYMA name (I'm not sure exactly when they started to add the 'C' but I'd guess around 1950 based on others that I own or have seen - plus the Tavannes markings on the ratchet wheel is normally only seen on the earlier watches. Lack of a movement number stamped somewhere is fairly unusual in my experience (which again may support an earlier watch), though in your movement pic there looks to be something stamped under the balance wheel?
Hmm can't tell what is under the balance wheel. The only number I see stamped is next to the ratchet wheel, 144436. That might be it, but from what I can see online, Cyma and Tavannes seem to be quite hard to track down serial numbers for anyway...
 

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Hmm can't tell what is under the balance wheel. The only number I see stamped is next to the ratchet wheel, 144436. That might be it, but from what I can see online, Cyma and Tavannes seem to be quite hard to track down serial numbers for anyway...
Unfortunately (at least in my experience), Cyma movement serial numbers seem to have been allocated in a completely random fashion - they're not even consistent in length (I have watches with 5 and 6 digit serials on movements from the 40s through to the 60s) - I suspect that they were given groups of serial numbers for each movement type, but on a fairly small sample, that's quite hard to prove one way or the other....
 

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Thanks again to everyone for the input, I now have the watch back, and in working order! Here's the movement:
View attachment 8918002
I am trying to identify it, so I searched through all the Tavannes/Cyma movements on a website called RANFFT (It seems because I am a new member with low post count I am not allowed to post the link)

I didn't find an exact match to mine, but to my inexperienced eye, the most similar one seems to be the Cyma 574 or 576 (again, I'm not allowed to post the link, googling "cyma 574 movement" will take you right there...)

If indeed my watch movement is a similar age as the Cyma 574 or 576, then it would also date to ca. 1940. as James A suggested. Plausible?
Hi echoes,

Great that you have the watch back and working. I have an image of the 576 you mention and I think your close. However notice the placement of the click (the small lever against the ratchet teeth)and the mainspring position.



Wear this piece of family history in good health.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wear this piece of family history in good health.

Regards,
Indeed! I will only be taking it out on special occasions...

Thanks everyone for helping me better understand this watch. Being able to date this to late 1940s is already quite an improvement over thinking before that this was from the 50s or even 60s!
 
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