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Probably it makes no difference, but I usually obscure serials for few dumb reasons:
- reduce chance that a fake maker copies design w my serial #
- reduce chance of scammer using my pics to sell a watch
- reduce chance of scammer reporting my watch as stolen, and then having trouble getting it serviced

I suspect chances of these are infinitesimal, but it only takes 5 seconds to blank out SN on a photo.
 

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Probably it makes no difference, but I usually obscure serials for few dumb reasons:
- reduce chance that a fake maker copies design w my serial #
- reduce chance of scammer using my pics to sell a watch
- reduce chance of scammer reporting my watch as stolen, and then having trouble getting it serviced

I suspect chances of these are infinitesimal, but it only takes 5 seconds to blank out SN on a photo.
Exactly. Better safe than sorry.
 

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I leave them on show. That way if a scammer buys your watch, claims it doesn't work, but sends you a defective watch (same make and model) in return, you can prove to PayPal/ebay/judge/god that he sent a different watch back.

Maybe I'm paranoid.
 

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I like the idea. Is better maintain the serial number in private comunication between seller and buyer if is required.
 
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I'll say the same thing I've always said in each of the threads about this;

A fake maker has absolutely nothing to gain from copying your serial number. They make a ton of watches, they're just stamping random numbers.

By not showing the serial numbers, you are actually increasing the chances that a scammer will use your photos. Without the original photos, with serial numbers, you have no way of proving it's the same watch.

The only real real reason to hide the serial numbers is to protect the AD that the grey dealer bought the watch from.

Mark
 

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I leave them on show. That way if a scammer buys your watch, claims it doesn't work, but sends you a defective watch (same make and model) in return, you can prove to PayPal/ebay/judge/god that he sent a different watch back.

Maybe I'm paranoid.
Who's to say that you didn't make the switch yourself? Unless you took video as you packed it, AND in some manner sealed it. Or had an independent witness when you packed it.

Now, if you have an extensive history of honorable dealings, this he said/she said would seem likely to go your way; how many scam buyers have a good record? (They certainly may have a long transaction history, of nickel and dime stuff. I've seen that with sellers from time to time.) I'd also suspect you'd have much better luck in a court of law...but the cost of doing so, even if you could bring the buyer to trial, would be obscene. Even if you could do it in a small claims court; I know I'd want legal advice in advance, even if no lawyers were present at the hearing.

Still, what you're doing seems in no way to be an unbreakable protection.
 
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I'll say the same thing I've always said in each of the threads about this;

A fake maker has absolutely nothing to gain from copying your serial number. They make a ton of watches, they're just stamping random numbers.

By not showing the serial numbers, you are actually increasing the chances that a scammer will use your photos. Without the original photos, with serial numbers, you have no way of proving it's the same watch.

The only real real reason to hide the serial numbers is to protect the AD that the grey dealer bought the watch from.

Mark
False, IMO.

Probably true for 98% of watches made...but not for the 2% or less of seriously valuable pieces...those where a counterfeiter will take the time and trouble to make a *good* fake. One recommended check is to ask the manufacturer if the serial number is correct.
 
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I never realized it was an issue. Good to know in the future.
 

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A dealer of higher end watches who I know told me to always obscure the serial numbers. He's been in the business a long time and had much to say about it. He said replica makers are constantly searching the internet to find pictures with serial numbers to put on their watches. Companies like AP have data bases of serial numbers that have appeared on replicas. You can call AP with a serial number and they can tell you if that number has been replicated. He also said, and this is getting off track, that there are very high end machining companies, notably in Italy, that are making very accurate copies. He talked to AP who had received one of these ROOs for inspection. They could not tell from the outside. When they opened the watch, they were stunned that they could not tell by looking at the movement until they did a partial disassembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I leave them on show. That way if a scammer buys your watch, claims it doesn't work, but sends you a defective watch (same make and model) in return, you can prove to PayPal/ebay/judge/god that he sent a different watch back.

Maybe I'm paranoid.
I think i totally agree with this..But are you also insinuating that "PP" are not 100% guarantee of safety?

And can such a thing happen?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A dealer of higher end watches who I know told me to always obscure the serial numbers. He's been in the business a long time and had much to say about it. He said replica makers are constantly searching the internet to find pictures with serial numbers to put on their watches. Companies like AP have data bases of serial numbers that have appeared on replicas. You can call AP with a serial number and they can tell you if that number has been replicated. He also said, and this is getting off track, that there are very high end machining companies, notably in Italy, that are making very accurate copies. He talked to AP who had received one of these ROOs for inspection. They could not tell from the outside. When they opened the watch, they were stunned that they could not tell by looking at the movement until they did a partial disassembly.
Thanks for the great info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'll say the same thing I've always said in each of the threads about this;

A fake maker has absolutely nothing to gain from copying your serial number. They make a ton of watches, they're just stamping random numbers.

By not showing the serial numbers, you are actually increasing the chances that a scammer will use your photos. Without the original photos, with serial numbers, you have no way of proving it's the same watch.

The only real real reason to hide the serial numbers is to protect the AD that the grey dealer bought the watch from.

Mark
I agree with you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Who's to say that you didn't make the switch yourself? Unless you took video as you packed it, AND in some manner sealed it. Or had an independent witness when you packed it.

Now, if you have an extensive history of honorable dealings, this he said/she said would seem likely to go your way; how many scam buyers have a good record? (They certainly may have a long transaction history, of nickel and dime stuff. I've seen that with sellers from time to time.) I'd also suspect you'd have much better luck in a court of law...but the cost of doing so, even if you could bring the buyer to trial, would be obscene. Even if you could do it in a small claims court; I know I'd want legal advice in advance, even if no lawyers were present at the hearing.

Still, what you're doing seems in no way to be an unbreakable protection.
That wont be much evidence..
 

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A dealer of higher end watches who I know told me ... He talked to AP who had received one of these ROOs for inspection. They could not tell from the outside. When they opened the watch, they were stunned that they could not tell by looking at the movement until they did a partial disassembly.
Sounds like he lied to you...
 

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Sounds like he lied to you...
Why? Some fakes are getting ridiculously good (in a bad way). AP RO Divers are becoming hard to distinguish from the real thing. Often times even movements look the same, but for free-sprung balance.
 
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