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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had posted on this watch a few weeks ago when I asked folks to help me ID it from a grainy photo.

Turns out the movement has been overoiled and some of that oil coated the dial. Fortunately, WUS member YuiryV was able to remove the oil from the dial without damaging the writing, but as a result it revealed or contributed to this patina. The question now is whether to apply a varnish to give it a more glossy look.

A part of me says to leave it as is because a varnish coating applied to a patina dial defeats the purpose of accepting and enjoying the watch in its naturally aged state. The other part says the varnish would help make it pop.

Thoughts?
 

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Its not a particularly valuable watch. I say do what you want to it, but I am no purist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is the movement. Oil stained on parts and possibly moisture has discolored the rotor surface, and hair spring slightly damaged, but we are hopeful it can be cleaned and restored and made fully functional again.
 

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The way the surface is now, with all it's bumps and irregularities lead me to believe that re-varnishing would not
accomplish the task. The irregularities would still show up, but with a new coat of varnish on top. Unless you could
find a way to strip off the old varnish without removing the finish beneath, I wouldn't recommend this.
It would be similar to painting an old car without doing any body work.
There is also the chance that the old varnish underneath would continue to fail or be incompatible with the new finish,
causing even more problems down the line.
 

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A gloss varnish would probably highlight defaults, satin would be a better option. The movement looks more like water damage then oil damage.
 
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