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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,... this site--> (sorry new member so not allowed to post link) indicates the adjustment steps of the 9F series HAQ movements to be 6SPY while several posts I have read on this site indicate the steps to be 8SPY. Quote from Seiko link above (in blue text):
What is a regulation switch?


There are several ways to adjust the precision rate of a mechanical watch and the most reliable is the regulator, which makes fine adjustments to the balance spring’s range of motion. The Grand Seiko team recognized its value. Caliber 9F also has a regulation switch with plus to minus graduations marked on it. This mechanism adjusts precision by switching the circuit to make corrections after a designated span of time. Let’s remember that Caliber 9F is, in all but the most extreme conditions, precise to ±10 seconds per year. The regulation switch allows adjustments within this range. If a comparison were to be made, you could say that it is somewhat like the designation of a leap year to adjust the calendar. One gradation in the regulation switch is equal to 0.0165 seconds in a day, or 0.5 seconds a month. Since the movement has a precision that is 100 times greater than that of a highly accurate mechanical movement, the sensitivity of this regulation device is beyond remarkable.



Does anyone have more history or technical information about 9F*** regulation?
Did the steps used to be 8SPY and now in 2018 they have been changed to 6SPY?
Have they always been 6SPY and mistakenly reported as 8SPY?

(New member, first post. Recently purchased SBGT237)
 

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Sorry, but your post is confusing. Maybe it's too early in the morning for me. Seiko states +/- 10 SPY. For special models it's +/-5 SPY.

The regulator "switch" can be seen on the movement. Turn one direction for + and the other for minus.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello jandrese, Thanks for your reply,

"...The regulator "switch" can be seen on the movement. Turn one direction for + and the other for minus...."

Yes, I understand that. The short version of the question is: If the regulator is turned one step if the + direction, does it change the timing by +6SPY or +8SPY? In other words, how big are the steps?

(I have since asked this question in the "High Accuracy Quartz watches" forum)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, it is a new watch (one month old). Not having any accuracy problems. Just wondering "what if". I plan to track the accuracy until a battery change is required, then, maybe, adjust the regulator. It all depends on my timing results.
 

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I think you can probably shoot an email to GS, could take a while but it's probably the best way to get an accurate response.

Also - I have the pre-GS branding version of your watch! SBGT037.

It's awesome!

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Hello jandrese, Thanks for your reply,

"...The regulator "switch" can be seen on the movement. Turn one direction for + and the other for minus...."

Yes, I understand that. The short version of the question is: If the regulator is turned one step if the + direction, does it change the timing by +6SPY or +8SPY? In other words, how big are the steps?

(I have since asked this question in the "High Accuracy Quartz watches" forum)
Seems like Seiko states 6spy very clearly in the statement you quoted. I'm actually surprised the steps are that large but what do I know?
 
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