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I recently got this GUB watch, produced in 1950s in Glashutte, East Germany.


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It is caliber 60.3, a version of GUB / Urofa 60 movement family. Notice the workmanlike approach - a robust and sensible movement, 28mm large, nothing gaudy or too obvious, but yet gold-plated chatons, sunburst pattern of barrel wheels, soberly decorated bridges.

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Notice also the Q1 mark. It seems that in 1950s it was used in East Germany to mark consumer goods of premium quality, produced under honest standards. 1950s were an interesting decade in East Europe, when the most urgent tasks of post-war reconstruction were over and people started to want to live and consume in earnest. This was especially relevant for the DDR, because Germany was on the losing side in two wars and people were getting annoyed with restrictions, postponed consumption, and substitutes. There is a German word, "ersatz", which I am not sure how to translate to English - maybe some native speaker will help. It means something like inferior substitute, and something made ad hoc, because the proper thing was lacking, maybe technologically advanced, but not what you really want and need - like coffee without caffeine, or beer without alcohol. So I guess Q1 meant at last something that was not 'ersatz'.

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I wonder if 'First class' mark on some Soviet watches from the late 1950s - like Strela or Poljot 2414 - was not influenced by this East German policy to introduce Q1 quality mark. A common assumption is that the influence in 1950s went one way, always emanating from Moscow and its satellites always on the receiving end, but modern historians claim that the situation was more complex, for example in chemistry (especially plastics) and architecture (especially ugly prefab buildings) it was DDR which was the model. Maybe some technologically and horologically literate forum member could find some common patterns in GUB and Soviet movements in 1970s - for example Germans often liked large watch bridges, when they didn't use 3/4, and maybe this influenced latter Poljot or Raketa full-bridge construction,
GUB_70_1.jpg
(source Dr. Ranfft)

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(source Dr. Ranfft)

maybe there were intellectual transfers within Eastern Europe, and not only US, Swiss or French influences to Soviet watch industry. But this is not my field.


I hope that you, comrades, will notice these watches and will start liking them as you do with the Soviet watches. They are not particularly appreciated by Glashutte adepts, because they are DDR, relatively cheap, and so on. But the movements are good and there are "wows" of appreciation when somebody like Dornbluth decorates the honest 60.3 movement and makes something like this

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source here (The Dornblüth ?Mini?). Maybe this is a matter of taste and lifechoice - there are people who adore and pay dearly for the late baroque / rococo style of modern GO / Glashutte watches, but maybe some of you will prefer the sober, classical, manly design of GUB Glashutte movements. After all, Saxony is place to find both Dresden rococo China plates, and heavy industries.
You can read more about GUB watches on these excellent sites

GUB - Jean Neef
Glashuetter Uhrenbetriebe - Uhrenhersteller und Uhrwerke aus Glashuette

and my starting GUB collection

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Have the same caliber in my GUB. Mine is from 1954, and I think your one is also (because of the serial number). And if it doesn't have Incabloc, it is definitely from 1954. It is a nice watch, but underestimated by collectors.
 

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Better late ....
"Ersatz" also means spare(part).
The watch has not the original Incabloc shockproof system. This one is not shockproof "Stossgesichert". It is a 16 stone type 60.3 Q1. The dial does not belong to the movement.
 

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Fascinating, Comrade storyteller. You do tell a good story! How about the chronograph? What movement is it? The DDR produced chronographs in the 50s?
 

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Fascinating, Comrade storyteller. You do tell a good story! How about the chronograph? What movement is it? The DDR produced chronographs in the 50s?
Privet tavaresh,
GUB 64 (1954-1961) is the chronograf of GUB. It's the same design as the Tutima Urofa 59, but smaller (28mm). Casing is from France. First models without shock protection. Later Incablock. Approx. 13.000 were made. Most casings of GUB plaque in the 50ties came from outside the GDR. On the dial you see : made in Gemany. Much later they signed GDR.
A lot of info in German can be found on the site Glashuette - Uhrenproduktion mit Tradition - Uhrenhersteller und Uhrwerke aus Glashuette

73's
 

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I have one GUB Glashutte timepiece and a very interesting one ! GUB Glashutte Spezichron diver 5 atm. cal. 11-27 . It is a successful attempt of East Germans to design a modern and accurate caliber in 70-th. The frequency is 28.800 and second hand runs very smoothly as one of Rolex . I like it very much.


 

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Priviet Tavarisch. Urofa 59 ? Like the Soviet version? Amazing. But the chrono pushers seem equidistant from the crown. How come?

FAscinating! how much do they go for?
 

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OKEAH,
I don't know how much they cost. I collect Sovjet watches and sometimes I manage to get a Glashütte for a reasonable price.
These are my 5 GUB/Glashütee watches. Spezichron cal.11-26, Spezimatic cal.75, cal.70.1, 69.1 and a 60.3 Q1 IMG_7815glw.jpg
 

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Glashutte watches were of high quality, and it's not just the Q1 series, which were top products of GUB.
Here's mine:



not a Q1, but still very well made







and with a wonderful dial!



Great watches, not any worse than the West German pieces, and probably better than some.
Some of the early Ruhlas were very nice as well, but we all know what happened next...





 

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Sorry to return to the GUB chrono Comrades, but I have a question. The Urofa 59 chrono pushers are not symmetrically arranged about the crown. The lower pusher is much farther from the crown than the upper one. This is evident from photos. In the pictures of the GUB cal.64 I sew recently this seems not to be the case. WHat is going on here? Did the East Germans change this? (I know they added shock protection).
 

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Sorry to return to the GUB chrono Comrades, but I have a question. The Urofa 59 chrono pushers are not symmetrically arranged about the crown. The lower pusher is much farther from the crown than the upper one. This is evident from photos. In the pictures of the GUB cal.64 I sew recently this seems not to be the case. WHat is going on here? Did the East Germans change this? (I know they added shock protection).
See this thread: https://www.watchuseek.com/f10/gub-64-relict-cold-war-689047.html

Tutima was a military watch. The reason for the offset of the pushers is unkown to me. The GUB 64 was produced for the civilian market.
 
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