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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a Hamilton 992B, but after close look, I found the dail is made from plastic, not porcelain as I thought. Is it original:-s:-s:-s
It is made in 1940s according to the number.
 

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I bought a Hamilton 992B, but after close look, I found the dail is made from plastic, not porcelain as I thought. Is it original:-s:-s:-s
It is made in 1940s according to the number.
I've never seen a dial made from plastic on the 992B's.
 

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I tried it with my fingernail, it fells 99% like plastic. So I bought a fake one with a plastic dail maybe. o|o|o|
I don't believe a seller would put in a plastic dial, and I haven't come across any faked Hamilton 992B pocket watches. It's a readily available pocket watch on eBay and elsewhere. Can you post a picture of the watch?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here is the doubtful watch. I bought it from ebay recently. It looks normal, but the following aspects are disturbing.

It looks OK:


But the back cover can not be fully tighten





The case is found chafing withe the movement, you can see the scratch. The movement stop the case from fully close:


I fell the dial with my fingernails, it feels not so smooth as my other Hamilton. Some scratches are also found right blow the center.


The movement, seems nothing woring with it.


I don't have any 922B before, so, is it an original one???
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It looks like a Hamilton #121 Melamine dial.
Oh. Yes, indeed! I am a beginner of Hamilton, so I do not know it so well. Is it original dail in 1940s, or just a recent copy for replacement?

And, how about the problem that the back case cannot be fully screwed in? What might be the reason?
 

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It's a very beautiful watch. I stand corrected in regards to the dial. Hamilton started the process of converting all 16 size dials from porcelain enamel to Melamine in the 1946-47 time frame. Hamilton made 3 different Melamine dials on the 992B (No. 121, 151, 168).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's a very beautiful watch. I stand corrected in regards to the dial. Hamilton started the process of converting all 16 size dials from porcelain enamel to Melamine in the 1946-47 time frame. Hamilton made 3 different Melamine dials on the 992B (No. 121, 151, 168).
Thank you so much for your introduction.
What might goes woring regards to the case? Is it poorly installed by a poor watchmaker? I thought the "replaced" dial was the one to be blemed, but now it seems innocent.
 

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Thank you so much for your introduction.
What might goes woring regards to the case? Is it poorly installed by a poor watchmaker? I thought the "replaced" dial was the one to be blemed, but now it seems innocent.
It's really impossible to tell without holding the watch. Perhaps someone here with a better eye will be able to tell you. You could also bring it to a watch maker and see what they say.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It's really impossible to tell without holding the watch. Perhaps someone here with a better eye will be able to tell you. You could also bring it to a watch maker and see what they say.
Yes. Indeed.:-d
I checked the number C132465, it is date back to 1944-1945, before 46-47. Is hamilton use melamine dial at that time? :think:
 

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I'm not an expert but your watch is probobaly an assembled watch made up of parts from 2 or more watches. All the parts seem to be correct, even the dial would have been correct, as a replacement, during a normal service. What seems to be wrong, is that the case, dial, and movement, have never been properly fitted. A good watchmaker should be able to make this right without too much effort.
 

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What you've got there is a RAILROAD watch. Don't forget that these were working men's watches. They were knocked around, banged up and had to perform excellently under some very very challenging conditions. It's not uncommon for them to have damage and to have repairs done on them all the time. My own Ball watch has a replacement hand on it and two hairline cracks on the dial. Finding a RR watch that's PERFECT isn't easy.

Is it a possibility that the caseback is cross-threaded with the threads on the case? Just a suggestion. I have seen it happen on a couple of watches. If not, then take it a watchmaker and have him take a look at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What you've got there is a RAILROAD watch. Don't forget that these were working men's watches. They were knocked around, banged up and had to perform excellently under some very very challenging conditions. It's not uncommon for them to have damage and to have repairs done on them all the time. My own Ball watch has a replacement hand on it and two hairline cracks on the dial. Finding a RR watch that's PERFECT isn't easy.

Is it a possibility that the caseback is cross-threaded with the threads on the case? Just a suggestion. I have seen it happen on a couple of watches. If not, then take it a watchmaker and have him take a look at it.
Thank you for you reminding, I have it fixed by loosen the two screws, which fix the movement, a little bit, so the height of the movement could be lower. Now, it's looks OK but I am still not so comfortable with the possible repleased dial. Indeed, as you said, it's difficult to find a perfect one.
 

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The dial looks perfectly fine to me, so I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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... Finding a RR watch that's PERFECT isn't easy. ...
And if you do, it probably means it wasn't actually used as a RR watch. RR watches were with the owner all the time they were working. They should look a bit used.
 

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Depends if you're talking about the watches used by the men working on the train, or the ones working in the stations. I believe Station Masters and other "administrative" types also required "railroad standard watches". And then there's the inspectors.
 

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Depends if you're talking about the watches used by the men working on the train, or the ones working in the stations. I believe Station Masters and other "administrative" types also required "railroad standard watches". And then there's the inspectors.
Maybe those positions posed less risk to the watch... but a watch carried 40 hours a week year after year is bound to look used. Perfect watches were most likely just not really used...

Normally I value NOS. But in the case of RR watches, I actually prefer real use. It adds to the panache! |>
 
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