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Hello,

So I was lucky on winning this 1960s 10KGF Hamilton Electric Taurus with a 505 electrical mechanical movement. I picked this watch up for a little over $40 on eBay and was sold as a non-working watch. I gave it a little cleaning and put in a new battery and it came to life. After a bit, it would stop working so I took it in to my local watch repair place and got it fully overhauled for $125. I feel very lucky to find such a stunning watch and in good overall condition.

I have a few questions though! I haven't been able to find much information on the Taurus model so I'm guessing it wasn't very popular. I would also like to know the size of the glass crystal. You can't really tell from the photo, but there are many scratches, and I would like to see if I can find a NOS replacement on eBay, but I can't find any information on this watch and dimensions.

Thanks for your help.
 

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Nice example of an under-appreciated watch! It's not one of the more avant-garde designs but it is asymmetric.

The Taurus was released on January 15, 1962 and was priced at $110 with a metal band specific to this model. Although some Hamilton Electrics were offered with a choice of metal band or leather strap, the Taurus was only offered with metal. Unfortunately they tended to wear out and you rarely seen an original band today. Your band is a later replacement. I would advise swapping it out for leather. Those replacement bands with spring-loaded endpieces (to fit a side range of lug widths) are brutal on lugs. The spring is powerful enough to act as a cutting tool as the band moves against the inside of the lugs in normal wear. I've seen lugs cut nearly all the way through from such bands.

Total production of the Taurus was about 6,700, which is definitely not the lowest in the series but is still on the lower end. Contrast that with the Pacer, which was the most popular style, at 42,800 total.

The crystal was originally acrylic, not glass. It measures 25.2mm.
 

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Hello,

So I was lucky on winning this 1960s 10KGF Hamilton Electric Taurus with a 505 electrical mechanical movement. I picked this watch up for a little over $40 on eBay and was sold as a non-working watch. I gave it a little cleaning and put in a new battery and it came to life. After a bit, it would stop working so I took it in to my local watch repair place and got it fully overhauled for $125. I feel very lucky to find such a stunning watch and in good overall condition.

I have a few questions though! I haven't been able to find much information on the Taurus model so I'm guessing it wasn't very popular. I would also like to know the size of the glass crystal. You can't really tell from the photo, but there are many scratches, and I would like to see if I can find a NOS replacement on eBay, but I can't find any information on this watch and dimensions.

Thanks for your help.
Ho
 

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This video in this thread might answer your question.

I don't think you need to remove the movement to change the battery. There is a simple clip across the battery that holds it in place. It looks like it has a slot on one side to keep it in place and probably a clip or tiny screw on the other side. If you mean to ask how do I remove the movement, I'm not sure which way it goes. Here's a similar watch, a Buren that was once owned my Hamilton, and mine is an electronic watch, not electric. It uses a transistor. Not sure if it's before your watch or after it. Anyway, a nice Hamilton you found.
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The Hamilton Electric really intrigues me. I have several Timex electrics but no Hamiltons. I guess the search is on.
Joe
They are out there, the Hamiltons, but not noted for their reliability, I have one, but it had been modded out with a quartz movement. What a disappointment when I opened the case and to top it off, the quartz movement didn't work either!

 

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They are out there, the Hamiltons, but not noted for their reliability, I have one, but it had been modded out with a quartz movement. What a disappointment when I opened the case and to top it off, the quartz movement didn't work either!

Oops, forgot to include the pic of the Hamilton. It's a great case, and gold, but I might have to get it made into a necklace :)

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They are out there, the Hamiltons, but not noted for their reliability, I have one, but it had been modded out with a quartz movement. What a disappointment when I opened the case and to top it off, the quartz movement didn't work either!

I have found one. It is supposed to have been serviced and is running accurately. We shall see. Will post more info and a photo when I receive it.
Joe
 

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They are out there, the Hamiltons, but not noted for their reliability, I have one, but it had been modded out with a quartz movement. What a disappointment when I opened the case and to top it off, the quartz movement didn't work either!

I'm not surprised that you mentioned that the Hamilton Electrics are not known for their reliability. I suppose that could be said for all electrics. I have 15 Timex Electrics and only three of them keep any kind of reliable time. Only one of them keeps time as good as one of my reliable quartz. But, that said, I still think that electrics are pretty cool and they have always fascinated me.
Joe
 
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I'm not surprised that you mentioned that the Hamilton Electrics are not known for their reliability. I suppose that could be said for all electrics. I have 15 Timex Electrics and only three of them keep any kind of reliable time. Only one of them keeps time as good as one of my reliable quartz. But, that said, I still think that electrics are pretty cool and they have always fascinated me.
Joe
I misspoke, reread Rene's discussion about the lack of success with Hamilton electric "conversions", not about the electrics themselves. Don't mean to cast shadow on your new purchase, which I hope is restored to a sparkling perfection. I include the thread from when I found my electric below, an interesting read for those interested in electrics. I look forward to seeing your new find and reading your impressions... As for the Timex, I agree. Mine is about the same.

 
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