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The lugs on the Murph 38 are 44.7; on the Auto they are 47. Further up this thread there is a model number of a Hamilton bracelet that fits the Murph38, at least according to someone on Reddit.
My bad, I saw that but I figured it was the same model # as the Auto bracelet. I checked and yep it's a different bracelet. I wonder what watch the one that supposedly fits the Murph originally fit to? I don't think Hamilton would have created it just for the Murph.
 

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Great review, and this is a nice looking watch, but I much prefer the Christopher Ward Sandhurst, so much so that I bought the series 2 shortly after it was released. It's been getting more wrist time than anything else since then - it's just such a great everyday watch, and it answers a lot of the reservations about the Murph that have been voiced so far in this thread.
Watch Analog watch Clock Material property Watch accessory
 

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Doesn't this have the disposable Powermatic 80 movement with the plastic escapement?
It's the caliber H-10 with silicone mainspring. What's your point? Aren't most movements inherently disposable and replaceable?
Not quite.

The H-10 (ETA C07.611) has a standard jeweled escapement and a standard metal mainspring.

Nobody uses silicon for the mainspring. There are some movements with silicon balance springs, including a version of the Powermatic 80, but the H-10 doesn't have one. Current versions use Nivachron for the balance spring which is antimagnetic, but still a metal alloy.

And none of them are disposable. They are all fully serviceable, including the "plastic escapement" version.
 

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glad they introduced the 38mm version. the 42mm murph was just too big for a lot of us.
 

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*Despite the click bait-y title, this post is not comparing the Murph to the Explorer.

A few impressions after wearing the Murph every day for 2 weeks. The watch wears very well. Its dimensions (38 x 44.7 x 11.1) should appeal to a wide variety of wrist sizes. It has often been compared to the Seiko Alpinist line, but the shorter lug-to-lug (44.7 vs. 46.5) and especially the thinner profile (11.1 vs. 13.2) make the watch extremely wearable. My wrist is only 6.25" and it fits perfectly with no lug overhang, and it slides under long sleeves without a problem.

The dial and hands are beautiful. This is subjective, but I love the slightly Art Deco numerals and cathedral hands. I wouldn't call the numeral color fauxtina, it is closer to bronze or khaki. Against the black face it presents a refined look. I've had no problems reading the watch. Some people have bemoaned the lack of Morse code on the seconds hand, but I think it improves the watch and allows it to stand on its own.

I read in other reviews that the stock strap was not good, and unfortunately that turned out to be true. I immediately replaced it with a brown leather strap from ColaReb (it's their Firenze line). I think it matches the vibe of the watch. I'm not convinced that it will look good on a bracelet, so I am considering a variety of options for summer including cork, silicone, and single-pass NATO.

The movement (H-10 caliber) is keeping incredible time. It's only gained about 2 seconds the entire time I have owned it. I've only had one other watch keep better time. It has an 80-hour power reserve so I could leave it for the weekend without having to reset it.

Yes, this is the watch from Interstellar but made smaller. I've never seen the movie, so that's neither here nor there for me. I just see a very classy looking field-style watch.

While definitely not a Rolex Explorer, there are similarities - black dial, time only, field-ish watch that is appropriate in a wide variety of situations. It has the same vibe: elegant but rugged. Like the Explorer, it could be your one watch. And you will save yourself roughly $9K.
View attachment 17176304
Looks great, however something about having the morse code on the second hand puts me off... I'd prefer the cleaner look with perhaps an option for that rather than the standard.
 

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The watch reminds me more of the Ranger39 than the explorer 1. How good is the movement in this 38?
 

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Not quite.

The H-10 (ETA C07.611) has a standard jeweled escapement and a standard metal mainspring.

Nobody uses silicon for the mainspring. There are some movements with silicon balance springs, including a version of the Powermatic 80, but the H-10 doesn't have one. Current versions use Nivachron for the balance spring which is antimagnetic, but still a metal alloy.

And none of them are disposable. They are all fully serviceable, including the "plastic escapement" version.
Actually this has a Nivachron balance spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
The watch reminds me more of the Ranger39 than the explorer 1. How good is the movement in this 38?
I hadn't thought of it being similar to a Ranger - good call! The movement has been keeping excellent time; around +2 seconds the entire time I've owned it.
 
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Rolex 126200, UN San Marco, 2 Casios and 1 Timex
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*Despite the click bait-y title, this post is not comparing the Murph to the Explorer.

A few impressions after wearing the Murph every day for 2 weeks. The watch wears very well. Its dimensions (38 x 44.7 x 11.1) should appeal to a wide variety of wrist sizes. It has often been compared to the Seiko Alpinist line, but the shorter lug-to-lug (44.7 vs. 46.5) and especially the thinner profile (11.1 vs. 13.2) make the watch extremely wearable. My wrist is only 6.25" and it fits perfectly with no lug overhang, and it slides under long sleeves without a problem.

The dial and hands are beautiful. This is subjective, but I love the slightly Art Deco numerals and cathedral hands. I wouldn't call the numeral color fauxtina, it is closer to bronze or khaki. Against the black face it presents a refined look. I've had no problems reading the watch. Some people have bemoaned the lack of Morse code on the seconds hand, but I think it improves the watch and allows it to stand on its own.

I read in other reviews that the stock strap was not good, and unfortunately that turned out to be true. I immediately replaced it with a brown leather strap from ColaReb (it's their Firenze line). I think it matches the vibe of the watch. I'm not convinced that it will look good on a bracelet, so I am considering a variety of options for summer including cork, silicone, and single-pass NATO.

The movement (H-10 caliber) is keeping incredible time. It's only gained about 2 seconds the entire time I have owned it. I've only had one other watch keep better time. It has an 80-hour power reserve so I could leave it for the weekend without having to reset it.

Yes, this is the watch from Interstellar but made smaller. I've never seen the movie, so that's neither here nor there for me. I just see a very classy looking field-style watch.

While definitely not a Rolex Explorer, there are similarities - black dial, time only, field-ish watch that is appropriate in a wide variety of situations. It has the same vibe: elegant but rugged. Like the Explorer, it could be your one watch. And you will save yourself roughly $9K.
View attachment 17176304
Definitely a great option. A high quality Swiss watch.

Hamilton has a low cost direct sales model. Very efficient.

Here’s the website:

 
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