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I have this Hampden a few years now.

dial.jpg movement2.jpg cover.jpg

From my quick research:

1. Hunter movement in a open face case

2. Movement was made 1885 approx

3. Possibly 17 jewels?

The minute hand looks odd in context to the hour hand, is this hand original ?

The hand is slightly bent as well.

I intend to get the watch serviced and cleaned next year as I am unable to set the time when I pull the stem out. When I turn the stem the hands won't move.

I can wind it no problem and the movement is working fine.

Any more information would be appreciated.
 

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You pull out the stem and it spins around freely without resistance? Maybe it's lever set. I'm on my phone so I can't really be of much help at the moment.

Lovely watch though!
 

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Okay, I had time to do some research and it's a hunter movement, as you found out, made approx. in 1887, size 18, 11 jewels, and it's lever set.

To set the time just unscrew the front bezel, you'll found a little tab on the outer edge of the dial which you have to pull out, then just turn the stem (don't pull it up!) and set the time.
 

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If you look carefully, you can see screw marks on the rim of the case around the movement that indicate that this case used to hold a different watch. That's fairly common; your Hampden is a nicely decorated 15j movement that was probably originally in a solid gold hunter case. These cases frequently find themselves victems of necessity, and are sold in times of need. Fortunately, the less-valuable movement was retained and transplanted into a different case. The case probably originally had a lesser (7jewel) movement. Speculation on my part, but it's a story we've seen countless times. The hands are a bit odd; the difference in the width seems a bit much for them to be a matched set, but the style is correct.
 

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What is sure, it is a Hampden 18s Model 2. After 1888 Dueber moved production from Massachusetts to Canton, Ohio where Hampden stayed in production until the end. By 1931 the production tools had been sold and shipped to Russia, or the Soviet Union as it was known as then.
 

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IMO, neither hand is correct. The minute hand looks to be of the correct style, but it's just a shade too short.
 

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As I said, I would consider the minute hand to be the correct style as far as thickness/heaviness. The minute hand is also a correct match style-wise to the second hand(which may be original). Thin hands were the norm in the 1880s, with bolder hands not generally being seen until after the turn of the century.

I don't collect Hampdens, but I do have a Springfield Railway from roughly the same SN range as yours that has fleur-de-lis hands, although I'm not sure something along those lines would be so correct for the dial you have.

Here's a mid-1880s Waltham with what I believe are correct and original hands. I would expect to see something similar on your watch

 
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Yanking up the crown will do zilch with this watch.

Here's a little trick.

Breathe on the watch a couple of times. Sandwich it between your palms and twist in opposite directions applying gentle pressure (hand closest to you going anticlockwise, hand away from you going clockwise).

Or breathe on the watch, place it in your right hand with the stem braced against your thumb. Using the fingers of your left hand, grasp or squeeze the bezel and twist anticlockwise.

Breathing on the watch warms it up a bit and metal expands when it's warm. This may help loosen it up. Then just apply pressure and twist.

Once you've got the thing off, find the lever. Dig it out with a fingernail. Don't rip it out. It should slide out a few milimeters. Twist the crown to set the time. Push the lever back in. Screw the bezel back on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Yanking up the crown will do zilch with this watch. Here's a little trick. Breathe on the watch a couple of times. Sandwich it between your palms and twist in opposite directions applying gentle pressure (hand closest to you going anticlockwise, hand away from you going clockwise). Or breathe on the watch, place it in your right hand with the stem braced against your thumb. Using the fingers of your left hand, grasp or squeeze the bezel and twist anticlockwise. Breathing on the watch warms it up a bit and metal expands when it's warm. This may help loosen it up. Then just apply pressure and twist. Once you've got the thing off, find the lever. Dig it out with a fingernail. Don't rip it out. It should slide out a few milimeters. Twist the crown to set the time. Push the lever back in. Screw the bezel back on.
Thanks for the tip!

I managed to get it off, with the aid of a pencil eraser.

The eraser provided a better grip on the smooth bezel than my slippery fingers.The lever was next to the number 5 and it popped out easy to set the time.

Thanks.

p.s. Was the watch case that now houses the movement made before 1924. I believe that the case makers couldn't state a 15/20 year guarantee on the case for gold fill after this year.
 

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For your Fahys Montauk watch case, these were made as guaranteed to 15 years until about 1898, thereafter they were 20 years. By 1904 they had a Caduceus symbol stamped on them. So your case was made between 1898 and 1904. Anyway as AbslomRob explained your case is not original to the movement as it has previous screw marks from another movement. This is quite common for watches as old as this. And you are right, by 1924 case manufacturers were not allowed to state number of years of warranty for wear through.
 

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Hi Recoil.

Yes, after 1924, you couldn't do the whole "Gauranteed to wear *X* Years" anymore. But previous to that, watch-case makers would have gold-filled cases that said: "Gauranteed to wear 5/10/15/20/25 years" on them.

After 1924, watch-cases were only allowed to include the level of gold in the filling. For example I've got a watch from 1899 that says "Gauranteed to Wear 5 Years". And I have one from 1955 that says "10kt Gold Filled", but which makes no mention of supposed duration of how long the gold will last.
 
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