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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I've recently acquired a beautiful (IMO) Kienzle hand wound wristwatch. It has a relatively simple movement. Unfortunately it stops after a few minutes after I wear it and needs a jolt (shake, tap) to start it again. After a few minutes it dies again. But it works perfectly fine sitting on the table. Does anyone know what could be wrong with it? It wasn't expensive, but I'm rather attached to it already.

Images from seller below.
Vintage gents wristwatch KIENZLE mechanical watch, working M

Regards, S
 

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. . . . . Does anyone know what could be wrong with it? It wasn't expensive, but I'm rather attached to it already. . . . . . . . . . .
Unfortunately the Bergeon crystal ball (part number 5000387) is no longer available to myself so a pyschic horological reading is precluded.

This is a simple movement indeed.

I think we can likely eliminate cracked or missing jewels as the problem.

Can you remove the back from your watch?

p
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Haha, I hope it's not a damaged jewel because it only has one! I have not personally opened the back but I know the seller did because of the picture. What is the crystal ball you mentioned?

Regards,

Stephan
 

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Haha, I hope it's not a damaged jewel because it only has one! I have not personally opened the back but I know the seller did because of the picture. What is the crystal ball you mentioned? Regards, Stephan
The crystal ball I referred to is a prototype device under development by a gentleman from France. This device (when properly employed) allows the remote diagnosis of mechanical issues related to watch performance.

Are you willing to remove the back from your watch?

p
 

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The really short answer is no, that isn't something you can do with limited knowledge. Taking it to a watchmaker will likely cost you between $50 and $150. Learning to do it yourself will likely cost you between $500 and $1000 (to start, anyway, after factoring in all the tools, books, supplies, sample movements, etc). So not really worth it for just one watch. If, however, you're feeling the "itch" and think you might like to become a crazy old watch guy like the rest of us, go to town! (with apologies to any crazy old watch ladies that happen by...)
 

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I've had this problem with a customer before where I work, except their's was a battery operated watch.
I came to the conclusion the only reason a watch would work fine when not worn, but then stop when worn, was to do with magnetism, Either you have some surgical implant in your wrist, are wearing additional jewelry or exposing it to other magnetic materials on your person or for whatever reason your blood has magnetic properties (which isn't as far fetched as it sounds) potentially, only very little magnetism may be required to grind the watch movement to a stand still.

Do not attempt any self repair if you actually want it to continue working. (trust me.)
See a professional, it's your only option I'm afraid.
 
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