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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to know from those that have or had hand wind watches, was there ever an issue with water resistance if it was used and wound daily for a lengthy period. It only makes sense for the gasket to get a lot of ware and tare after years of HW. Basically how long were you able to go without replacing the seal. My concern is if it used around water often or just wanting to clean it by rinsing it under some water you might not know until it is too late. Are they built to last longer then say a auto in regards to the seals and say the whole movement itself.
 

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Most of my handwinds are vintage from the 1940s or earlier. I wouldn't wear them outside on a humid day. ;-)
Seriously, I try to keep all older watches well away from water. Even a vintage diver should be carefully checked before introducing it to water (if at all.)
I have never been able to understand the obsession with dunking watches in water. Easy enough to remove them before washing the car (or wear a G-Shock.)
 
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Are they built to last longer then say a auto in regards to the seals and say the whole movement itself.
Unless you kill the watch with water / humidity I think a hand-wind watch will last longer than an auto provided that it receives proper care & maintenance, the main reason is that it doesn't have the automatic winding mechanism, this part is rather fragile and suffers a lot of stress during the daily wear.
 

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Most of my handwinds are vintage from the 1940s or earlier. I wouldn't wear them outside on a humid day. ;-)
Seriously, I try to keep all older watches well away from water. Even a vintage diver should be carefully checked before introducing it to water (if at all.)
I have never been able to understand the obsession with dunking watches in water. Easy enough to remove them before washing the car (or wear a G-Shock.)
+1, and how about the dudes who insist on taking a shower while wearing their watch? I totally don't understand why you'd want to do that, not to mention the soapy residue...
 

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I would like to know from those that have or had hand wind watches, was there ever an issue with water resistance if it was used and wound daily for a lengthy period. It only makes sense for the gasket to get a lot of ware and tare after years of HW. Basically how long were you able to go without replacing the seal. My concern is if it used around water often or just wanting to clean it by rinsing it under some water you might not know until it is too late. Are they built to last longer then say a auto in regards to the seals and say the whole movement itself.
I am getting a feeling of deja vu...

That is kind of an impossible question to answer, so many variables.

- lubrication?
- abrasives in seal area?
- type of rubber used in gasket?
- sizing of gasket
- side loads

If exceptionaly worried about it, have it pressure checked periodically, say annually.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Come on, I'm not talking about bathing with it or any water activities. Just an occasional accidentally getting it soaked while washing your hands or like I said giving it a rinse off if it ever got say dirt or mud on it. I know to take off the watch when indulging in certain activities, sometimes you can forget or the situation arises suddenly.
 

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All quality modern watches have some level of WR.
If you have the watch tested once a year / once every two years, and it has the declared WR, you can do anything with water. Swip, bathe, jump from a trampoline...

Vintages - I think of them as having Zero WR.
 

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Vintages - I think of them as having Zero WR.
PLenty of WR in these vintages!



If they were made to withstand water originally, and you maintain and service them as you would any modern watch (crystal/seals/pressure test), there is absolutely no reason not to wear them in the water. That's what they were made for!
For watches (vintage or modern) which were not designed for water use, then by all means avoid water.

As far as handwound watches (vintage or modern), same thing applies, although the watchmakers I use DO recommend checking and replacing the stem/crown seals more often than selfwinders for exactly the reason that started this thread.


~Sherry.
 
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