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Discussion Starter #1
I was reading a forum post and read something about negative effects on hand winding an automatic watch. Most of them referred to ETA 2824, which I am still learning about. Anyways, I have two Orient Star's that are autos with hand winding features. One (which I bought from the forum) has a problem, which I was aware of. The watch was dropped and the screw broke with the rotor. Because of that, I have to hand wind the watch to get it to run, even though it is an Auto. I do the same with the Orient Star Classic from time to time, but not as much since I wear it frequently and it has a power reserve.

I don't know movements too well yet as I'm still learning, but I was wondering if there are negative effects from hand winding these particular watches, or auto's in general (for future reference).

Again, I know there are a lot of these threads. From the ones I did read however, most of them were talking about the 2824 movement. I did not find one about Orient/Japanese movements.
 

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Judging from a disassembly blog from watchguy.co.uk. You'll be alright. - Service: Orient calibre 46943 | Watch Guy

Orient's general design is pretty similar to the Seiko 5 series. These movements are build for ease of production so parts are generally pretty rugged. The Orient Star lines added the hack and hand winding complication in their latest offerings so I am assuming this is the type of watch you own. Anyhow, whether it was designed for manual winding only or an automatic with the manual option. The amount of daily wear and tear you contribute to the hand winding components are rather minor. However, if the winding gears are completely free of lubrication (usually silicon graphite or similar), you could perceptibly be slowly grinding the crown teeth out of spec. My experience with Orient QC have generally been pretty positive and should not be of concern.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for your reply! After reading the other threads, I started getting pretty worried that I would completely destroy the watch. This made me feel much better. I am amazed by Watch Guy and his ability to take apart and clean everything so nicely. Did not realize how much goes into these watches! This also eases my mind:

"This is proof that, yes, many watches will run off wrist power alone, but winding it via the crown keeps the mainspring tight and the watch running at its optimal performance. The crown had never been wound by this man. This watch will keep great time if it is worn regularly now that it has been wound via crown."

Just out of curiosity still, is it just the ETA movement that has these winding issues?
 

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As far as I know the weakest point on any auto is the hand winding mechanism. I think it was just the ETA 2824 that had a fondness for eating teeth off the hand winding cogs but being neurotic like I am I take that extra bit of care with all my ETA powered watches.
 
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