WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A lot of times when talking about movements, I see people talking about hacking and hand-winding being a sign of a higher quality movement. Particularly with the seiko monster, a lot of people were waiting for a hacking/hand-winding movement. With my automatics, I just give them a little shake and they run for as long as I wear them, why the need for hand-winding? Also to a lesser extent hacking, although I could see if you wanted to be as accurate as possible even though you might lose/gain a few seconds a day. But hand-winding, how come it's so popular on automatics?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
I want it to both get things running in the morning and to build up a reserve since my desk duties don't do much winding at all.


No electrons were harmed in the sending of this message with Tapatalk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,161 Posts
I agree with you on the handwinding, but hacking is nice for setting the time. I dont set either as criteria for purchasing a watch.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
25,689 Posts
Why Is It Important To Wind My Automatic Watch With The Crown? | Bernard Watch Blog

Short answer - handwinding is good for your watch's movement.

Not quite as short answer - ever have a non-hand-winding automatic with a power reserve meter? I did, when I owned the Orient Conductor. It quite literally took me five minutes of shaking it back and forth to fully wind it.

Why do that? Well for one, I was curious how long it would take to reach full power, but for two, my watches don't get worn that often, and I don't use winders. So to keep them from sitting stagnant for too long, I'll go through my box every so often and give them all a good hand-winding. About 40-50 turns is generally enough to reach at least half-power, and takes about one minute to do, versus standing there like a doofus shaking my watch for five minutes.

Ain't nobody got time fo' dat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ohhhh ok I get it now. Especially sitting at a desk, and wanting to wind your watches you're not wearing, makes perfect sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I rotate through several mechanical watches. If I wear one for several days, I don't have a problem with letting the others expire. But sometimes I like to have more than 1 ready to go in the morning for options, or I might wear a watch only one day and then switch back to what I was previously wearing. And none of my mechanicals would make it past 2 nights on their own (all in that 38-44 hour power reserve range).
And to top off the power, I much prefer winding the crown than standing there swirling the whole watch.

Of course, rather than thinking about winders, I'm looking at 60+ hour power reserve watches :)
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
25,689 Posts
I rotate through several mechanical watches. If I wear one for several days, I don't have a problem with letting the others expire. But sometimes I like to have more than 1 ready to go in the morning for options, or I might wear a watch only one day and then switch back to what I was previously wearing. And none of my mechanicals would make it past 2 nights on their own (all in that 38-44 hour power reserve range).
And to top off the power, I much prefer winding the crown than standing there swirling the whole watch.

Of course, rather than thinking about winders, I'm looking at 60+ hour power reserve watches :)
I don't think I've ever heard or read a definitive answer on this subject, but it's my belief that auto-winders are bad for your watch. I think it's better to let your automatics run down than it is to keep them constantly rotating, so long as they're either worn or hand-wound enough to keep their lubricants circulating around the inside of the case.

Assuming you wear the same watch every day, for 8 hours a day, and the service interval is 3 years, putting it on a winder when you're not wearing it would seem to cut the service interval by 2/3, down to one year, and decrease the watch's overall life expectancy.

Most watches will gain time while being worn (increasing power reserve), and lose time while not being worn (decreasing power reserve). The gain and loss will offset each other, hopefully perfectly. Putting a watch on a winder will remove the watch's ability to compensate for gained time with lost time, and throw off your watch's accuracy.

NONE of the above is put forth by me as FACT, simply conclusions I've reached, but they seem logical and reasonable to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
If I'm buying an affordable watch, I don't really care whether it hacks or handwinds. If I'm plunking down a chunk of change for a less-affordable, however, I expect both features.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
Short answer - handwinding is good for your watch's movement.
There are claims that hand-winding a 2824 is bad for it. I was routinely hand-winding my 2824's to get them fully wound at the start of the day, but stopped doing so after reading through all the material on this issue that I could find. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,214 Posts
There are claims that hand-winding a 2824 is bad for it. I was routinely hand-winding my 2824's to get them fully wound at the start of the day, but stopped doing so after reading through all the material on this issue that I could find. YMMV.
Out of all the 2824 movements this issue has most likely occurred in a very small percentage of watches. Even if it occurred in a few batches of the movement it would still only be a minuscule amount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
I don't think I've ever heard or read a definitive answer on this subject, but it's my belief that auto-winders are bad for your watch. I think it's better to let your automatics run down than it is to keep them constantly rotating,
many would say that money spent on a winder could be spent on a new affordable, but i love to see a watch on a winder. a good winder well not keep the watches turning. quality programmable winders like Orbita and Wolf Designs stop the watch in different positions, often have 8 hour rest cycles, and can be very finely tuned to the proper turns-per-day. you can keep a watch wound and as accurate as possible with a good winder.

that being said my winders cost more than most of my watches, so it does not always make sense to get one for affordables.

over all i don't keep most of my autos on a winder, but i personally am a fan of good ones. i used to have a wood cased programmable Orbita it looked great and the way it worked was amazing. after that was stolen in a burglary i decided if i couldn't get a good quality winder i would not bother getting any at all.

i have no idea if they are good or bad for a watch but i really don't think it will hurt it much. i probably do a lot more damage wearing it on the elliptical at the gym. i do know that i like to see my watches slowly turning on winders and ticking away :)

as far as hacking is concerned i would love to have a zenith el primero, but i am pretty sure that doesn't hack... and i would be totally happy with that.

i think that i would also keep this one on a winder if i ever took it off.:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
519 Posts
I usually choose the watch I'm going to wear in the morning the night before, if I have not worn it lately I like to set it before bed because I sleep until the last possible moment to still be on time, so being able to give it some juice is good. If it does not hand wind I will save it for the weekend. Hacking on the other hand makes no difference to me other than the little thrill I get from pulling out the crown and watching the second hand stop, I'm all like, "check it out I made the second hand stop". I say this to myself, I'm not some weirdo, right?

G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
Doc is absolutely right, when you have a watch that rarely gets worn, hand-winding an automatic is clutch. Imagine having to set an automatic moon-phase with none-hacking movement, every time you want to wear it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,478 Posts
Yeah, it's all about convenience. I have an orient with a power reserve meter, it really does take like 4-5 minutes of 'wanking the watch' to fill the power reserve fully. That's basically 5 minutes of that morning where you can't do anything else (eat, shower, whatever - having to shake one hand all the time is really distracting). And it just plain looks stupid, imo. Whereas winding with a crown - unscrew, 40 turns in ~40 seconds, screw back. One minute at most, and it's fully wound. That's why hand-winding is such a big deal for me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
61,463 Posts
I find the ability to hand wind a watch useful for a couple of reasons:
1/ If ever I want to fully wind the watch to say check the power reserve it's easy to do.
2/ My rota means that my autos stop after a bit and I find twirling the non winders enough to give them a good start to the day a PITA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
I think it's more of a convenience factor and a nice bonus for affordables, at least in my opinion. I snagged two Orient Star's that have the hand winding and second hand hack feature, and I absolutely love it. My Golden Eye doesn't have either and it also lacks a power reserve, so I had to shake it every night for a few minutes. My Fiance recently bought me a winder, and I actually had a question about that, which others have already somewhat answered.

She got me an affordable one from Brookstone, but it has 4 timing features and rotates both clockwise and counter clockwise. Is it better to have it on the setting that lets it rest for 9 hours? I find that when my watches are on the winder, they lose significantly more time than if sitting in the box, specifically a Seiko I own which was consistently +2/3 seconds a day whether it was on my wrist or in the box, until I stuck it in the winder haha. Now it's like -15 a day, even on the wrist. That's when a hand winding feature would be nice ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
806 Posts
Yeah, it's all about convenience. I have an orient with a power reserve meter, it really does take like 4-5 minutes of 'wanking the watch' to fill the power reserve fully. That's basically 5 minutes of that morning where you can't do anything else (eat, shower, whatever - having to shake one hand all the time is really distracting)..
that's not pefectly true. depends strongly on what you do...

hony soit qui mal y pense 2.0
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top