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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've built up my G-Shock collection solely by buying used ones in very good shape. If you're patient enough, you can nab some serious discounts this way (I've gotten about 65% off the going market price on my best one, in near mint condition).

However... I have found that a majority of the used G-Shock watches I've bought have had accuracy issues. One was so bad, it was gaining almost one minute per month. So, it leads me to wonder if some people ditched them because of accuracy falling outside the acceptable variance, that being +/- 15 seconds per month. Of course, in most cases hardly anyone mentions anything about accuracy in their G-Shock auctions.

Anyway, I don't know what causes such a nasty deviation... maybe a few very hard knocks or exposure to extreme temperature changes? Also, perhaps the accuracy naturally drifts over time. However, there is hope. Many of you may have already seen the various WUS threads about adjusting G-Shock module accuracy, but in case you haven't you can find a decent write-up on the MyGShock Wiki, based on a thread started by member stan2323 (link). I didn't go the full scientific route of using a stopwatch, instead just eyeballing it. As a result, in just one small turn of a screw on my G-2310, it went from gaining 1 second per day to about 1 second every 7 days.

If you do attempt to do this, there's a couple of key things to keep in mind that aren't mentioned in the Wiki.
  • First and foremost, note the original orientation of the trimmer screw. In most cases it will be a Philips head screw (+), while older ones will have a flat head screw (-). You can look at the screw slot position relative to any markings on the module, or create your own mark with a fine pen. It's easier to note the position with a flat head, because there are only 2 ends to the slot and generally you won't be turning the screw more than 45 degrees.
  • The trimmer screw should turn without much effort, however on an older module it might require more effort. Also, the small flat head is more difficult, because the channel is so thin and shallow. You might need a pen knife to do it.
  • Most modules adjust (-) counter clockwise (definitely modern ones), but some vintage ones are the reverse. It is best to make a very small turn first (about 10 degrees), to see how the module reacts. It could very well be that turning the screw and then returning it to the original position may actually cause a deviation from the original gain/loss. You don't want to end up in a crazy back-and-forth chase to find the right position for minimal accuracy drift. So, the less you turn the screw, the better.
  • After your first turn of the screw, note the accuracy change across the next 12-24 hours. If time seems to be gaining or losing time more than before, then the required screw rotation is opposite what you did. If you need to adjust the watch some more, try to gauge it by turning a little less that you need to. In the end, you will have some deviation still occurring but hopefully much less than before (within +/- 10sec/mo).
  • Once you've made a couple of adjustments, you'll find yourself getting better at gauging the deviation. The closer you are to accuracy, the longer it will take to read the time drift (usually no more than 2-3 days). Also, it is possible that environmental changes may affect your accuracy. If you use your watch hiking, snorkeling, cycling, and/or skiing, you'll probably see a slightly greater tendency for accuracy drift. But for a watch not exposed to much change, you'll probably find that one adjustment every couple of years is all you need.
  • I found that once I got into doing this, I wasn't satisfied with +/- 10 secs per month and managed to get a couple watches down to +2sec/mo. It was gratifying to achieve that, but in the end really not necessary. If one needs super accurate precision, best to get an atomic sync model.
So, a frustrating loss/gain of time on a G-Shock can be remedied. I recommend trying this out on a "junker" or least liked watch in your collection, just in case you have any trouble along the way... it'll help you get the idea of how the process goes and make it easier for your next one. If you're really good at keeping track of things, you might even do a bunch at once. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hmmmm... I guess not. Well, if I had a digital watch that had an appealing appearance but kept gaining/losing enough for me to reset it every month, I'd find it annoying and not feel bad about letting it go... unless I knew of some way to correct it. Or maybe a lot of people don't have that kind of accuracy expectation, because time displays are everywhere (phone, car, home, work, computer...). Having it on the wrist is just for fashion or for ease of reference when doing an activity?
 

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Now it's possible that I'm just still too new to watch collecting, but I currently don't think that it should be an issue. There are people who think that since quartz (a digital one to boot) is supposed to be more accurate and reliable, then when a quartz loses its supposed advantage over automatics, they find the watch has thus lost its value and throw it away. I am not one of them. I am more of a wear-it-to-the-death type, who will only sell a watch when I know the potential buyer will take care of it better than I did.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I wouldn't say it's so much value as it is usefulness. Quartz watches when properly adjusted are much more accurate than automatics. If one loses or gains quite a bit more time outside the specifications, doesn't that defeat the purpose of quartz? From my experience, most people I know who need to replace a quartz watch battery just go to a mall watch booth or a local jeweler, instead of doing it themselves. I actually brought up the time accuracy problem with a local jeweler and they had some absurd charge of $75 to do it. Why? "Well, we spend about a week doing adjustments and follow-up measurements, aiming for +/- 5 seconds per month accuracy if the watch can achieve it." It's so easy to do it yourself, but most people probably haven't a clue. And so, if you've got several quartz watches that are within +/- 15 sec/mo and one is gaining about a minute or more per month, wouldn't a good percentage of people find that annoying with a watch costing over $100? If I didn't know how to adjust it, I'd probably sell it.
 
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