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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well... Helium gas is said to be the second smallest molecule in nature. Therefore is may enter the watch's case around the seal rings... than's why some diver's watches have the release valve... (read more here) but...

...if the gas is so small that is finds its way inside the watch.. how come it does not find its way out of the watch without a valve ???

just a thought... :think:
 

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If you were in some sort of deep sea habitat, helium would force its way into the watch due to the higher ambient pressure. The same thing would happen to gasses in your blood stream. Not having a pop-off valve in your head, you have to spend some time in a decompression chamber or else those gasses would bubble up in your blood vessels like a bottle of Coke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the replies, friends. The principles of the Helium entering the case of the watch is pretty well explained on the link I posted. But, I just cannot understand why the gas can go into the watch thru the seals, from being a very small molecule, but cannot come out the same way, therefor needing a valve....
 

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thanks for the replies, friends. The principles of the Helium entering the case of the watch is pretty well explained on the link I posted. But, I just cannot understand why the gas can go into the watch thru the seals, from being a very small molecule, but cannot come out the same way, therefor needing a valve....
The watch is designed to keep pressure OUT, not hold pressure IN. So the watch case keeps pressure out, except for helium, which can work its way through the seals (slowly) and into the watch, and thus build pressure inside the watch. When the pressure is released from outside the watch, the helium built up inside will force itself out of the watch as well. Normally it would just work its way out through the seals, but what do you know, the crystal isn't held in with much force. So it just pushes the crystal out. A helium release valve lets the pressure escape because its activation threshold is lower than the force required to pull the crystal out.

-s-
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
skoochy, your explanation helped me link the dots now. The helium goes in because there is a lot of pressure OUT and vacum IN... when the watch goes back up to the surface, the opposite occurs. Yes, the helium would probably go out, but causing a lot of pressure inside the watch case.

But, since 99,9% of us will NOT be 300 meters below the surface of the water, does it make any sense to unecessarily have one more spot where water can leak into the watch ??
 

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But, since 99,9% of us will NOT be 300 meters below the surface of the water, does it make any sense to unecessarily have one more spot where water can leak into the watch ??
Well, the valve is designed to be one-way ... naturally, it could fail, but that's less likely than a crown gasket failing (think of how often you operate the crown compared to us who never use the HEV).

For those of us that will never do saturation diving (I've been in a bell ONCE in my life), just having the HEV is unnecessary! I mean, how much do you think TAG expands its market by adding this feature? They could sell more watches by lowering the price $100 than by adding the HEV.

-s-
 

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It's similar to having a street car with 500hp in the city; we'd all be fine with 200hp, but hey, if one can get from x up to speed limit in less seconds and puts a grin in your face every time you get shoved in your seat...; now, if you have the opportunity to drive in the Autobahn...different story. I guess I can make a similar analogy between sport diving and saturation diving relative to the watches needed. Will 99% of us who either sport dive or simply splash around the pool really need anything more than a 200M rated time piece, no, but do we like the look of a 500M+ rated watch, many will say :-!.
 
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