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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently acquired this unusual Juvenia pendant watch and want to find out about it--how old, how is the case opened, what is it made of etc. I contacted the manufacturer and was told it was made between 1920 and 1935 and was a "fantasy" watch but got no more detail.
The watch is marked Juvenia/Switzerland on the face and no other markings are visible except for a peculiar engraving on the back showing an elf riding a snail (seriously!). The watch is approx 1" in diameter and about 3/4" thick at the widest. It is a pendant watch but the ring used to put it on a chain is missing.
I don't know how to open the case--might be a serial number in there? It is not working, but there is reasonable tension on the winding stem.
Does anyone know any more about this watch, or has anyone ever seen one like it?
I'd love any info.
Thanks,
MissEmilyAnne

Juvenia watch front view with scale.jpg

Juvenia watch side view (2).jpg

Juvenia watch back view of engraving (2).jpg
 

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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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Welcome to Watchuseek and I am sorry that noone seems to have been able to help you so far. And I am of limited use too.....

To me, it seems odd that the watch is so thick when it's basically no more than a ladies' pendant watch (by the look of it). Sure, the thick glass helps magnify the dial and facilitates reading the time but that's about it. Without the missing ring, I had wondered whether it was a sort of dashboard watch/clock, meant to be clipped into a car dashboard but if it used to be on a ring.....

As for opening it, I suspect I see a thin line in Picture 2 where one might take off the rather convex back and get in in conventional style. Other than that, it would need to be accessed from the front but I would consider that rather less likely. Some better, more focussed pictures would probably help.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your response. There are two parallel grooves around the circumference of the watch at its widest point. I assume that is how it is opened, although i have been hesitant to try. The Juvenia representative told me it was a pendant watch, and based on the dates of manufacture (1920-1935) it seems unlikely it was intended to be mounted on a dashboard.
My real focus is--has anyone else ever seen anything like this? The Juvenia representative was not very helpful on that point I would have thought they might have inventory lists or records from past years showing images, but apparently not. How would I go about finding out? I'm also interested in value. Any thoughts?
I'll add better photos if you think that would be useful.
 

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Hi there,

your watch has style elements from the 40s through 60s, but the crown points to the end of this periode. I'm afraid, wihout movement pic nobody can give useful informations. Löök around the grove of the back. There should be a spot, where it is wider, to press in a knife blade to popp off the back.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Greetings,
I managed to open the Juvenia watch and now have the serial number. It is 181323. That number appears on the inside back of the case. On the gear mechanism the following appears "17 jewels unadjusted" and here are a couple of photos. Does this help in identifying the watch?
Thanks! Emily januvia serial number.jpg
juvenia inside watch.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Heard back from manufacturer. Date of manufacture is 1936. Watch has a 10 1/2 movement (whatever that means) and is chrome nickel. It isn't running, but with the case back off I could see that the wheels attached to the winding stem turn when the stem is turned, and when I turn the watch sideways two other gear wheels also start to turn and the hands move. It doesn't continue to run, but that may be because I am fearful of winding it too tightly. Any thoughts?
 

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Vint. Forum Co-Moderator
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Good news is that it runs to some degree. It will need a service. Depending on how I interpret your description it may have some damage to a pivot/staff or jewel/ bearing so may need some repair or it might just be that it needs a service. Further diagnosis really needs the watch in hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What's involved in getting the watch serviced? I live away from major cities (in the mountains of western North Carolina) so it is unlikely an expert watch person is available. Any recommendations?
 

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Vint. Forum Co-Moderator
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Few people live within easy travel of a good watchmaker. There is a sticky with some suggestions. Members nearer to you might have recommendations.
 

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What's involved in getting the watch serviced? I live away from major cities (in the mountains of western North Carolina) so it is unlikely an expert watch person is available. Any recommendations?
Have you looked online? There is a shop in Asheville that appears appropriate just based on its web presence. If you are nearby, it might be worth taking it there to get an opinion from them before mailing it off. I have no firsthand knowledge of this store, but it seems worth a look. They mention that they have three in-house watchmakers and they have a page on their website with a very detailed description of the services they perform. Looks plausible at first glance.

https://www.thewatchmakersshop.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks so much for the recommendation. I'm not too far fro Asheville so I'll check with them. I don't know much about watch values--do you think this watch would be worth repairing? It's pretty, and it must be fairly rare as not much information is available about it, but I know that rarity does not equal value. Any thoughts?
 

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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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It will very likely not be worth repairing if you want to sell it. Nor if it is only going to lie about in a drawer. If you are going to use it, it would be worth having done up since the cost should be lower than getting a new mechanical watch of any kind and because it will greatly extend the lifespan of what you have. I.e. it is cheaper to have that one serviced than to keep getting new ones once the old ones peg out completely!

Hartmut Richter
 
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