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Discussion Starter #1
I need to find a donor movement (looking for a balance wheel and staff). Can you help in trying to identify the movement? It's a large size pocket watch with not a lot of info to go on I am afraid. The movement itself measures at 53.77mm.




















Any help or leads would be greatly appreciated. :-!
 

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johnno1954...Hello. Take a look at "Dave's watch Parts". He has a Great selection of used Swiss movements, parts, etc. I've done business with him, and he's a fine & honest fellow.

Good luck! Michael.
 

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Given the shape of the keyless works, that is almost definitely a Fontainemelon (FHF) movement of some sorts. Modded to a "Jules Jurgensen" style bridge shape but the origins are clear enough. You just have to find out the exact calibre it was based on (size is one key feature here) and you should be able to fit the generic balance staff. 54mm diameter (ca. 23''') is quite a large, rare size, though.....

bidfun-db Archiv: Uhrwerke: FHF 18.5'''H5 Lepine (for the shape of that little shoe-shaped bridge in the keyless works)

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Any directions on how I might begin to find the Caliber this Fontainemelon is based on? Am I correct thinking that the answer will be in the Ranfft data base? Or maybe the Bestfit 111A or 111B?




 

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johnno1954...a few more thoughts: 1.) There are times when it's best to simply have a new balance staff made. 2.) I used to know a very experienced & accomplished Watchmaker who would sometimes put a 'cap' on a broken pivot...rather like installing a crown on someone's tooth: he'd grind the bad pivot down, reduce the diameter of the staff, find a donor staff in his parts collection, cut a good pivot off & drill a hole in it, and press it down over the original staff, and finish-up by smoothing everything down.

He was very good at this, and it was a pretty quick & inexpensive way to put a good-quality watch back in service. Of course, we'd all suggest cutting a new staff as being the 'best' way to go, but I always liked Owen Winter's technique, and--may he Rest in Peace--he knew his trade, and I expect that other's continue to do the same thing. Michael.
 
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