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Discussion Starter #1
Hi
I have this Omega Automatic Geneve 565 Movement. Is it authentic?
I feel like the movement is loose in the case, can be a wrong case?
It needs service/ overhaul. Is it worth it? what is a fair price?
Thank You very much

omega front.jpg

omega movement 565.jpg

omega case.jpg

omega back.jpg
 

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Here's the OVD entry for the steel version of this reference:
https://www.omegawatches.com/planet-omega/heritage/vintage-details/14478/

It existed as a part of two different collections, Seamaster and Geneve. You've obviously got the Geneve version.

Yours has a cal. 565, which is one of the two movements (the other being the 562) correct for this case. So it's just the holding screw issue and the loose rotor.

Regarding value, we don't provide that here.

If I were you, I'd have it serviced and wear it.
 
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Fair price for a service is about 325 USD ...
This may well be true in Silicon Valley, but the watchmakers that I use charge about 150 USD to service a watch like yours (automatic, 3-hand, date). Of course, if any parts are needed, their cost is added to the price. You may want a crystal, a better crown, and some new spring-bars.

Edit: The movement itself is of excellent quality, and worth servicing. For me, the major issue is the case. It's hard to tell from the photos, but the case appears to be in rough shape, and I'm wondering whether the lower right lug is damaged. However, if the case looks better to the naked eye, and you would be happy wearing it, then by all means go ahead.
 

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You live in Cortez?
This may well be true in Silicon Valley, but the watchmakers that I use charge about 150 USD to service a watch like yours (automatic, 3-hand, date). Of course, if any parts are needed, their cost is added to the price. You may want a crystal, a better crown, and some new spring-bars.

Edit: The movement itself is of excellent quality, and worth servicing. For me, the major issue is the case. It's hard to tell from the photos, but the case appears to be in rough shape, and I'm wondering whether the lower right lug is damaged. However, if the case looks better to the naked eye, and you would be happy wearing it, then by all means go ahead.
 

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Thank You. Yes, I found a small screw, it was loose inside !
It is not just the screw you are looking for. You also need the metal tab like piece of metal that the little screw screws down to hold the movement against the case.

I think the loose movement in the cause has caused the rotor to rub against the case back as it is rubbing on the middle area of the rotor. Usually a loose rotor will rub the case back at its edge. If the rotor is loose then you will need a new rotor axle and brush/bushing/bush(I have heard it called all 3 or these names. It is basically a little gear that is attached to the underside of the rotor which transfers the winding motion of the rotor to the mainspring.) these tend to be the Achilles Heel of the Omega 5XX movements. Luckily those parts really don't cost much if you look around. I was able to snag a new OEM Rotor Axle and Bush for my Seamaster 501 for less then $40. As it was getting a full service at my watch maker's (with a full clean and dissemble) it did not cost any thing for him to replace it laborwise.
 

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You live in Cortez?
No, I live in the general Denver metropolitan area, and the price I quoted is fairly common in this area for an independent watchmaker. As has been well-established in previous threads, the cost of watch repair varies widely throughout the US, and I wanted the OP to be aware that it may not cost him as much as it costs in the Bay Area.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is not just the screw you are looking for. You also need the metal tab like piece of metal that the little screw screws down to hold the movement against the case.

I think the loose movement in the cause has caused the rotor to rub against the case back as it is rubbing on the middle area of the rotor. Usually a loose rotor will rub the case back at its edge. If the rotor is loose then you will need a new rotor axle and brush/bushing/bush(I have heard it called all 3 or these names. It is basically a little gear that is attached to the underside of the rotor which transfers the winding motion of the rotor to the mainspring.) these tend to be the Achilles Heel of the Omega 5XX movements. Luckily those parts really don't cost much if you look around. I was able to snag a new OEM Rotor Axle and Bush for my Seamaster 501 for less then $40. As it was getting a full service at my watch maker's (with a full clean and dissemble) it did not cost any thing for him to replace it laborwise.
I didn't see any metal tab, just that screw. I don't know how much damage that screw did inside ....
Before opening I could feel the rotor moving and the watch was working ( for a few minutes). Now I don't want to do anything till I take to a watchmaker.
I hope the rotor is not loose and it is just the movement.
I would like to have it serviced and wear it. I love this watch already.
Thank You
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This may well be true in Silicon Valley, but the watchmakers that I use charge about 150 USD to service a watch like yours (automatic, 3-hand, date). Of course, if any parts are needed, their cost is added to the price. You may want a crystal, a better crown, and some new spring-bars.



Edit: The movement itself is of excellent quality, and worth servicing. For me, the major issue is the case. It's hard to tell from the photos, but the case appears to be in rough shape, and I'm wondering whether the lower right lug is damaged. However, if the case looks better to the naked eye, and you would be happy wearing it, then by all means go ahead.
I think the case is just in rough shape and I feel the lug is not damaged ( I hope). I love this watch already, I try to have it serviced as soon as I can. Of course I will add a new glass, spring-bars and maybe a crown.
I will wear and it will be my second vintage( I have an Ulyssee Nardin Chronometer from 1963). Thank You
 

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Looks like a very nice Omega...yes, the poor case has seen quite a bit of wear, but--with just a bit of intelligent 'freshening-up'--it will look much, much better, and give many more years of fine, entirely presentable, service.

Do be very careful to make sure that whoever does the case, understands how easy it is to over-do it, and 'polish' the case into the trash bin. You might want to ask others here just how they deal with worn cases...be advised: this can be a contentious issue, and some folks harbor very strong opinions on just what may, and may not, be done! I prefer to keep my opinions to myself...I will say, tho, that I do all my cases ( as a Hobbyist ) by hand, with a range of abrasive media, and always do as little as possible...it works for me!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Looks like a very nice Omega...yes, the poor case has seen quite a bit of wear, but--with just a bit of intelligent 'freshening-up'--it will look much, much better, and give many more years of fine, entirely presentable, service.

Do be very careful to make sure that whoever does the case, understands how easy it is to over-do it, and 'polish' the case into the trash bin. You might want to ask others here just how they deal with worn cases...be advised: this can be a contentious issue, and some folks harbor very strong opinions on just what may, and may not, be done! I prefer to keep my opinions to myself...I will say, tho, that I do all my cases ( as a Hobbyist ) by hand, with a range of abrasive media, and always do as little as possible...it works for me!
Thanks Michael. I don't mind the worn case, actually I like it. I am more worried about the movement and to find a watchmaker to service it.
 
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