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First thing first.. Merry Christmas to you all!!!! Hi guys... the Protrek is fun!! but I have a probelm... well sort of... the altimeter when I first got it was dispalying fine... but now... its displaying negative vaule! why? and how do I adjust it and if I need to?? I remember that I had a protrk before and I actually went to the beach at sea level in where Ileave to re-adjust[?] or re-calibrate?? should I do that when I go back to Vancouver?? I am still here at SD ...

or I read somewhere that they can get the coordinates ofd the web as well as altitude and then set the watch with those info??? Please let me know

Thanks

Bruce
 

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Moderator G-Shock Forum
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Ha ha ha ha ha,

Reminds me of showing my PRG-80 to some friends while walking over the dunes about 20m above sealevel. The display showed something like -140m, so my friends laughed at me.

The altimeter works with the barometric sensor. Under normal circumstances the air pressure doesn't change much, so if you set the watch at a known altitude, the altimeter is riliable for several hours. My PRG-80's are very accurate actually. If you use the function without calibrating, you can get very strange readings.

At stormy and rainy weather and specialy during thunderstorms, a barometric altimeter is not riliable. If you see something like this picture below, while you stayed on the same level, the altimeter won't give good readings, but then again, you might not like to go out climbing or mountainbiking;-)


Picture taken during a thunder storm.

Cheers,,

Sjors
 

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Hi Sjors an everyone on this wonderful forum...
My experience with I.S.A altimeters from CASIO date back when i bought my first TWIN SENSOR watch: an ALT-6000 (now with damaged resin bracelet...sigh, sigh).
They (SUUNTO too) all are developed in accordance with International.Standard.Atmosphere model (from I.C.A.O organization).
To get a "reliable" reading (within 5 mt. for all CASIO and some SUUNTO models) they need to have calibration at known altitude.
Too many airplane accidents are due just to inaccuracies and mistakes in setting initial conditions.
The I.S.A model define 0 meter above the sea level at pressure equal to 101325 Pa @ 15 °C.
This reference ("0 meter") can change as weather conditions also change.
Thanks.

Marco.
 
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