WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My wife inherited the watch shown below from her grandmother. Her grandmother was from a wealthy family, they lived in Germany and emigrated to the United States early in the twentieth century, so the watch could have been purchased in Europe or the US. I did an extensive Google image search to see if I could find a watch that looked just like it, and was surprised to find only one or two images that vaguely resembled it (but clearly were not it). So I thought I'd check with some experts: any idea where my wife's grandmother picked the watch up? Also, does it have any monetary value?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
My knowledge of JLC is very limited, although I do believe there was another company called LeCoture that had nothign to do with the more-famous JLC. I wonder if this is from that company?
Well, the watch face does have "A. LeCoultre" writen on it, not "LeCoture" so probably not. I understand that the watches were sold in the US as simply LeCoulter watches, and that the company made watches for other firms for a time before starting out on their own when they were based only in Europe, prior to joining up with Jaeger, so it could be from that period, too. "A. LeCoultre" probably refers to Antoine LeCoultre, who founded the firm, but I have no idea for what period "A. LeCoultre" appeared on the watches. Wikipedia has a nice page on the history of the company.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,965 Posts
My knowledge of JLC is very limited, although I do believe there was another company called LeCoture that had nothign to do with the more-famous JLC. I wonder if this is from that company?
The original poster's watch likely predates the founding of the modern Jaeger-LeCoultre firm in 1937. I don't think the movement on that watch was made in the Le Sentier factory, although it is Swiss.

The watch company that marketed the "LeCoultre" brand in North America after WWII was part of Longines-Wittnauer, Inc., an American company, that was not officially affiliated with any of the Swiss factories whose watches they imported. These also included LeCoultre and Vacheron & Constantin. The movements on LeCoultre watches were made right alongside the Jaeger-LeCoultre branded movements in the Le Sentier factory. Most, but not all, of the LeCoultre watch cases were made in the USA and mated with the movements at the L-W Co.'s factory in New York.

It all can be a bit confusing at times,
gatorcpa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yes, very confusing indeed! My suspicion is that it the watch may date back to the 1800s, as my wife has since told me she thought her grandmother may have inherited the watch from her mother. Reading the early history of LeCoultre, they seem to have at one time been a sort of watch making collective where artisans worked individually to make "their" take on LeCoultre watches, then LeCoultre brought it all together in one "manufactury," all of this well prior to the union with Jaeger. Since my wife's family came from Germany, they could have gotten the watch back then, in fact, it makes the most sense. But I am hampered by a lack of KNOWING. Could be an old LeCoultre knockoff, even, if there were such things (and I'd be surprised if there weren't). I don't want to be like the folks I saw on Antiques Roadshow once, bringing in statuette of Elvis their mother had owned that they were SURE was a bit of priceless memorabilia, only to be told it was a cheap novelty whiskey decanter ...
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top