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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
thanks for support on how I can find a centre wheel for an old pocket watch, as per attached design.
Almost finishing restoration of an old family pocket watch. Not much financial value but a lot of family value.
I will post photos after the restoration is completed.

Thanks again for all the support.

Regards,
Claudio Centre wheel 1.jpeg

 

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Hello Claudio,
That is a fine and detailed drawing of the part you require.
You should be aware that the tooth count of the wheel and pinion are also important.
If you know the manufacture and caliber of your watch then your best bet would be to
search out a donar movement unless the part is still readily available.

This looks to be a three part, 'clutched' center wheel and arbour, i.e the center wheel is staked to the pinion
which is bored and the arbour is a close fit but can turn inside the wheel and pinion. The canon pinion end of
the arbour is slightly tapered and the canon pinion, being a tight fit, doesn't rotate during setting...am I right?
If so then there are actualy three parts here, if it's only the arbour that is damaged then you'll have an easier job
to replace this part.
 

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I have recently bought part of a watchmaker's estate, one of the boxes had thousands of different center wheels in it.
If we can't find out the caliber and manufacturer of the watch here, I can see if I can find one in there that'd fit. Or perhaps just send you the box so you can do the work ;)

I'm pretty sure the gurus on here would be able to identify the movement if you could post some pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks very much for your fast reply.
I attached some pictures, so you can have a view of the clock as it is now.
I finished restoration of the case and replace the glass.
I have all the parts (even if not shown in the movement), except the centre wheel which is broken.The hour wheel is not in good shape too, because is quite old and the hour dial gets a bit loose. But apart from that, everything is working.
I believe that it is a quite common watch from the mid/end 1800. It might be more to the mid of the 1800, because it is a pin set watch.
The movement does not have any mark of factory and don't have tool to measure calibre :-(. Movement diameter is 43,5 mm on the back-side.

Radger: you are right about the wheel, it is a 3 part. The canon pinion is fixed to the wheel and the axis goes inside the canon. It all started when the axis was not tight to the canon and it was rotating inside the canon. With a big lack of experience and without the appropriate tools, I broke the top of the canon pinion (the part that is over the wheel where the axis goes inside - sorry don't know the english terms).

Pej: I would love to look at your box of centre wheels, but I'm now living in Australia and it is a bit far :), though I would be very grateful if you take a look and check if you have one with same measures.

Thanks all for the support.
Claudio
 

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Hi Claudio,

The arbour on this center wheel is supposed to rotate inside the center wheel pinion.

On a 'modern' watch, the canon pinion rotates on the arbour to allow the watch to be set whilst on your watch
the canon pinion (which you do not show) is a tight fit to the arbour and when setting the time on this watch it is the arbour
which rotates, the canon pinion along with it.
The canon pinion along with the hour and minute wheel make up the 'motion work' of the watch.

Good luck in finding the part.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Radger,
thanks very much for the insights.
This movement seems to be a bit different from what you describe. The minute dial is assembled directly to the arbour and not on the canon pinion (does it make sense, or someone did some strange changes on the movement?), so it seems that the arbour must be tight fit to the canon pinion to get motion to the minute dial. The canon pinion has the same length of the hour wheel, so it stays inside the hour wheel and it is not possible to assembly the minute dial to it.

Thanks very much.
Claudio
 

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so it seems that the arbour must be tight fit to the canon pinion to get motion to the minute dial.
Thanks very much.
Claudio
Hi Claudio,
Your description of the setup is how I described it....

"the canon pinion (which you do not show) is a tight fit to the arbour and when setting the time on this watch it is the arbour
which rotates, the canon pinion along with it."

It's confusing I know, but if you think about it, it makes no difference whether your min hand is attached to the canon pinion
or the arbour as they both turn together. On a modern watch the minute hand must be attached to the canon pinion as the canon
pinion turns on the arbour to allow setting whilst on your watch the whole shooting match turns inside the center wheel and pinion.

It should be tight enough to carry but slack enough to allow the setting of the hands.
There are various methods of 'tightening' a too 'slack' arbour to the center wheel pinion and wheel, a very slight bend can be introduced to
the arbour, a broach can be used to raise a slight burr inside the center wheel pinion or a fine bristle from a watchmakers brush is inserted
between arbour and center wheel hole...but the best method is to replace a too slack arbour with a new and correctly fitting arbour.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Radger,
I see. Thanks very much for all the insights.
Hope I will post some photos of the watch full assembly in the near future.
Regards
Claudio
 
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