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Discussion Starter #1
Guys, hope everyone’s doing fine considering the current circumstances. Just wondering if any of you could help me figure out how to remove smudge from a dial. I was trying to clear some marks using Rodico and it left a very faint smudge on the dial (right next to the 200m print)

Thank you all in advance!




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This is an educated guess, I believe the best way to proceed will be to remove the hands and movement so that the dial is free. I would then clean the entire dial using a mild astringent such as isopropyl alcohol.

Whenever attempting to remove a blemish from a pre finished surface you need to avoid trying to 'spot clean' because you will likely create another and more noticeable spot or blemish.

I would work with only the bare dial and use a high quality Q Tip being careful not to scrub the luminous material while not missing any of the dial surface. That approach will provide a uniform cleaning to all of the finished surface equally.
 

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The dial finish is pretty durable but being a matte finish if you aren’t careful rubbing it with Rodico or pegwood you can polish it and cause the ‘smudge’ you see. I’d be careful trying to do anything to fix it.


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lastshotkid...Hello!

You've gotta be really careful around dials: some of these things are amazingly easy to damage, even if you feel you're being as cautious as possible.

Although it may be 'best' to leave good enough alone, I agree with Ard at least insofar as removing the dial's concerned...I respectfully suggest, however, that going near with it with alcohol makes me really nervous: I have memories of my own dial-cleaning experiments, and it seems that I once tried something along this line, with disastrous results!

Nowadays--if I cannot resist the temptation--I would probably look at a dial very closely with my trusty B&L Loupe ( 'don't set down at the bench without it' ), and convince myself that it's in good-enough condition to tolerate the stress of a 'cleaning', and have at it with just a little dishwashing detergent dropped on to the dial, and ever-so-gently moved about for a few seconds under my finger, and quickly rinsed off with warm tap water, and dabbed-dry with a soft cotton cloth.

You might get away with it. You might not.

Am I recommending this detergent idea? No...I'm just saying that I have used it on some dials, and it turned out OK.

Oh: it's been my experience with Rodico, that sometimes the best way to deal with smudges left after its' use, is to...use it again! Try a fresh piece, and go over it one more time. Just dab it up & down, being careful to treat any printing or fragile-looking markers with great respect: this stuff is Great, but, it WILL lift some types of printing right off a dial or a movement...it's really aggressive on some surfaces.

I'm pretty sure that your smudge can be dealt with, just be careful not to make a nuisance into something ruined!

Michael.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The dial finish is pretty durable but being a matte finish if you aren’t careful rubbing it with Rodico or pegwood you can polish it and cause the ‘smudge’ you see. I’d be careful trying to do anything to fix it.


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I do think that it may be best to leave it alone for now. You would actually need a loupe to see it. Arghh but I know it’s there though lol.

Many thanks!


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Discussion Starter #6
This is an educated guess, I believe the best way to proceed will be to remove the hands and movement so that the dial is free. I would then clean the entire dial using a mild astringent such as isopropyl alcohol.

Whenever attempting to remove a blemish from a pre finished surface you need to avoid trying to 'spot clean' because you will likely create another and more noticeable spot or blemish.

I would work with only the bare dial and use a high quality Q Tip being careful not to scrub the luminous material while not missing any of the dial surface. That approach will provide a uniform cleaning to all of the finished surface equally.
That makes a lot of sense and thank you for the suggestions.


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lastshotkid...Hello!

You've gotta be really careful around dials: some of these things are amazingly easy to damage, even if you feel you're being as cautious as possible.

Although it may be 'best' to leave good enough alone, I agree with Ard at least insofar as removing the dial's concerned...I respectfully suggest, however, that going near with it with alcohol makes me really nervous: I have memories of my own dial-cleaning experiments, and it seems that I once tried something along this line, with disastrous results!

Nowadays--if I cannot resist the temptation--I would probably look at a dial very closely with my trusty B&L Loupe ( 'don't set down at the bench without it' ), and convince myself that it's in good-enough condition to tolerate the stress of a 'cleaning', and have at it with just a little dishwashing detergent dropped on to the dial, and ever-so-gently moved about for a few seconds under my finger, and quickly rinsed off with warm tap water, and dabbed-dry with a soft cotton cloth.

You might get away with it. You might not.

Am I recommending this detergent idea? No...I'm just saying that I have used it on some dials, and it turned out OK.

Oh: it's been my experience with Rodico, that sometimes the best way to deal with smudges left after its' use, is to...use it again! Try a fresh piece, and go over it one more time. Just dab it up & down, being careful to treat any printing or fragile-looking markers with great respect: this stuff is Great, but, it WILL lift some types of printing right off a dial or a movement...it's really aggressive on some surfaces.

I'm pretty sure that your smudge can be dealt with, just be careful not to make a nuisance into something ruined!

Michael.
Thank you Michael! I think, after reading all of the responses, I can just convince myself that it isn’t as bad and like I said in another reply, I don’t even see it without a loupe.

Truly appreciate your suggestions!


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Thank you Michael! I think, after reading all of the responses, I can just convince myself that it isn’t as bad and like I said in another reply, I don’t even see it without a loupe.

Truly appreciate your suggestions!


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I think once it’s cased it won’t be so obvious.


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I ran a business for years that did historical restorations, not watches but I reconditioned some items much more valuable than the dial you posted, think on the level of high end watches in value. The cardinal rule was no spot work, either the entire surface or leave it original. That said it sounds like you may leave it alone which may be best.
 

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The residue will be oily in nature. I've had success with blotting paper. Have also had success with foam-tipped applicators (which are sold by material suppliers).
Don't know which Rodico you are using...but use only the gray low-tack. Sometimes I have actually taken the residue off by using the low-tack Rodico and blotting faster so that the residue sticks to the Rodico, not the surface from which I am lifting.
It has as much to do with the technique as the tool.
Worst case senario, you have to order a Seiko dial.
Regards, BG
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you! I completely agree about correct technique. This is a good learning experience

Truly appreciate all your help!


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Grey rodico is the least oily. Followed by blue rub off. The worst (and yet most popular) is green rodico.

Bergeon (and other makers/suppliers) have foam tipped applicators, and also silicon tipped ones (sticky tips) you can use to pick up dirt and debris from dials.


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Discussion Starter #13
Grey rodico is the least oily. Followed by blue rub off. The worst (and yet most popular) is green rodico.

Bergeon (and other makers/suppliers) have foam tipped applicators, and also silicon tipped ones (sticky tips) you can use to pick up dirt and debris from dials.


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Yup I got the green rodico. Thanks for the info!


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