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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm reaching out in this forum as I thought it'd be the best place to find people who actually know what they're talking about.

Essentially I'd like to replace the mineral crystal on my Spinnaker with a domed replacement Sapphire from the interwebs.
Pictures of defendant -
IMG_20201013_092324.jpg
IMG_20201017_075639.jpg

I bought this for a good price and can't believe how much I'm enjoying it. It's also running super accurately -1 sec/day giving me another reason to keep it.
But the glare and distortion is just terrible.
1) I reckon the glass is 35.5mm in diameter. But I don't know whether to order 1.5mm thick or +2mm thick sapphire?
2) Is it best to take the glass out and measure it before I order a new one?
3) I've never taken glass out, or put it in. (I've always asked my local Timpsons shoe/key man to do it). But I want to do itself. Can I take it out and put it in by hand? Or will I need to buy a watch glass press machine thing?
 

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You need a crystal press. You'll need to "recon" the size accurately to 0.1 mm. Might need to replace the crystal gasket to preserve WR rating. You'll want to do a pressure test after to check water resistance to 100m.
 

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catsteeth...Hello!

Short answer today: please consider that there's more to replacing this crystal than meets the inexperienced eye, and you'll need to have on hand some tools and the ability to use them...it's something that you really might want to entrust to a Watchmaker.

Having said this, I'll also say that you may well want to learn how to do this yourself, and that sounds just fine. Perhaps an on-line video would cover about all you'd need to know. The point I'm working towards here is simply that working on watches requires quite a few tools--some of which are unique to watchmaking--and, attempting repairs or modifications can be fun and rewarding, IF you have on hand what you need...it really is pretty specialized stuff, and you must be prepared.

Still: stay motivated! Even those of us who have been around watches for years, had to start sometime...now it's your turn. Watch a few videos to see how things are done / acquire any tools you think you'll need / learn on a watch or watches that you can 'afford' to make a mistake ( or two! ) on / get a feel for things / move to watches like the one you've shown here ( nice watch! ) / have some fun!

Michael.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
catsteeth...Hello!

Short answer today: please consider that there's more to replacing this crystal than meets the inexperienced eye, and you'll need to have on hand some tools and the ability to use them...it's something that you really might want to entrust to a Watchmaker.

Having said this, I'll also say that you may well want to learn how to do this yourself, and that sounds just fine. Perhaps an on-line video would cover about all you'd need to know. The point I'm working towards here is simply that working on watches requires quite a few tools--some of which are unique to watchmaking--and, attempting repairs or modifications can be fun and rewarding, IF you have on hand what you need...it really is pretty specialized stuff, and you must be prepared.

Still: stay motivated! Even those of us who have been around watches for years, had to start sometime...now it's your turn. Watch a few videos to see how things are done / acquire any tools you think you'll need / learn on a watch or watches that you can 'afford' to make a mistake ( or two! ) on / get a feel for things / move to watches like the one you've shown here ( nice watch! ) / have some fun!

Michael.
You need a crystal press. You'll need to "recon" the size accurately to 0.1 mm. Might need to replace the crystal gasket to preserve WR rating. You'll want to do a pressure test after to check water resistance to 100m.
Okay. Thank you both guys.
That's pretty clear then. It is more difficult than I thought, well I suspected that. I'm also going to need the proper tools to do it, again I thought that'd be the case.
I'm going to have to decide whether this is a course I want to go down. Like everything now days, the whole whole world is on YouTube. So it'd just be lots of trial and error, and some monetary outlay. But like all these things, you can spend a lot very quickly.
I'm not into that whole 'modding' thing, they invariably look worse.
But I would like to swap glass, and regulate movements. Although I'm sure that's being rather ambitious.
If I do jump down this rabbit hole, I'll update.
 

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One sentiment I catch from your post is that you REALLY LIKE your Spinnaker watch. Perhaps it would be wise to try a few crystal replacements with watches that are not so close to your heart, and then work your way up to the Spinnaker.
 
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