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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all, my first post so forgive the noob.

A couple of years ago I picked up a few Seikos on eBay, paid beer money for them and they've sat in a box since then. My interest in all things horological has been fanned by a friend of mine who has a modest collection of high end pieces. My budget doesn't stretch to that so I dug out the old eBay collection and wondered if anyone knew what this lot contains. I'm a little suspicious that the three on the left might be fakes, particularly the gold one as some parts of dial don't match up properly and only the green faced 5 works. Research points to it being a winder as the back says it's a 6620 movement. The Diashock on the right also seems to have a 6620 movement from the serial number and I think it's my favourite due to it's 1960's (April 1967?) minimalist look. As it paid so little for them if they turn out to be duds so be it.

Here are the numbers from the back if that helps at all, along with the text from the dial:
Gold: 6309-6100 183043 Automatic 21 Jewels
Grey: 6119-8083 564723 Automatic 23 Jewels
Blue: 7009-3040 701146 Automatic 21 Jewels
Green: 6620-8050 548455 Water Proof 17 Jewels
White: 6602-1990 7400700 Diashock 17 Jewels

Seikoebaybuyssmall.jpg
 

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Seems like you have done quite a bit of research already. To be sure about authenticity you should post higher resolution pics with dial, back and movement. Although that's not much of a concern for this type of purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
eBay via sellers in the UK, if memory serves as it was some time ago. I'm guessing from your comment they aren't what they seem.
 

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Give a look inside to see if it's any better that the casing, which is quite disheartening, including amenities like 7 digits SNs, 7S36 or unmarked dials, etc.
 

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The gold, blue, and white look ok - at least not an obvious redial.

But the grey and green look suspect - more so the green. The 12 o'clock marker on the grey one looks off, as well as the applied "SEIKO" logo. But the green one is an India Special - all of the details on the dial are garbage and, as far as I know, Seiko has never used "JAPAN MADE", only "MADE IN JAPAN".

If they all came from the same source, they are all probably frankens and/or redials. If the seller you bought them from acquired them separately, then you may have a mix.

But unless you are an absolute stickler for authenticity - even on inexpensive watches like vintage Seiko 5s - just wear them and enjoy them. I would consider the gold, blue, and white authentic and wear them - they may be frankens, but have original Seiko parts. And for the grey and green, I would either throw them away or tuck them away in a drawer for spare parts or tinkering.

As you mentioned, you fortunate didn't pay much and you can just have fun with them.
 

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just wear them and enjoy them. I would consider the gold, blue, and white authentic and wear them
Beside authenticity the thing is, as the OP mentioned, only the green one works. And having others work may cost much, much more than the initial purchase.

I'm bookmarking this thread, the pictures are excellent to show what should be avoided in a vintage Seiko 5 purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I took the backs off the Gold, Grey and Blue. Whilst the dials claim 21, 23 and 21 jewels respectively the movements day 17. These are then 'Frankenwatches' or fakes and as they don't work they will be used for practise and taken apart. The White one has a snap close case back and proving difficult to remove so can't check that yet...any suggestion how to remove the back?

For [email protected] here is the green with the back removed. Let me know and if you want me to post pictures of the others too. Glad I could be of service in adding to the knowledge base of what to avoid. Lucky for me is it was inexpensive and enlightening.

Green Internal.jpg
 

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These are excellent pictures, please take more when you've got time. For more clarity remove the rotor when picturing the movement.
If you're interested in learning watchmaking I recommend thewatchsite.com and watchrepairtalk.com, both are very friendly and Seiko-inclined forums.
 

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With the caseback removed you can manually wind the watch turning the ratchet screw (it's the biggest wheel about 5H) clockwise 8 - 10 turns. That in case the autowind wasn't working. A good movements starts spontaneously at the 3rd or 4th turn. Others need a slight shake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
With the caseback removed you can manually wind the watch turning the ratchet screw (it's the biggest wheel about 5H) clockwise 8 - 10 turns. That in case the autowind wasn't working. A good movements starts spontaneously at the 3rd or 4th turn. Others need a slight shake.
Thanks again. Lots to learn.
 
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