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Hi Everyone,

I'm trying my best with some watch pictures these days and have found one thing particularly challenging - capturing a light reflection on a white faced watch. Here are two pretty similar watches and two similar set ups (lighting was very similar but positions ultimately different).
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This one was quite easy to position the angle of the diffusion panel and lights and capture the nice soft transitioning reflection.

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This one ....not so much. You can only see the slightest hint of a reflection at the 11 o'clock position. No matter how I positioned the diffusion panels and lights, I couldn't get more than this without completely over exposing the dial.

Anyone have any secrets they are willing to share on how to capture a nice reflection on a white dial watch. I've only been able to pull it off a few times and after hours of light / diffusion panel manipulation.

Thanks!
 

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Try moving your camera at an angle so that the gap betwen the crystal and the actual dial face becomes prominent, or you move the light at such an angle of course you would need multi light set up for that. It might help you get the reflection on dial.
 

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White dials are so so hard. I have the hardest time with my Nomos. Flat lays are difficult too, i've usually gotten the best results at angles so I'm afraid i'm not too much help. Just don't give up and keep looking at different angles. Great pics
 

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Just one more TX Timex Enabler Club - Broths Hams n Subs
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Speedmaster Professional 1970
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I have been away for a long time.
Shooting watches, pens and any object with highly reflective surfaces, we often use composite images composed of multiple shots. It's pretty straight forward, make sure the camera and the object do not move (sturdy tripod is a must have and a remote trigger is good as well ) and move the lights around.
A white or black reflector can help a lot too and in most cases avoid going with a composite shot :)
Here is an example of a guitar composite shot.
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That's a beautiful guitar. What program do you use to combine the shots? Some of us are too broke from buying watches to afford Photoshop. ;)
 

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GIMP is pretty good, have not used it in probably a decade or so, but I am sure it has some sort of HDR, or Light Stacking feature. You could also try a program I use for Astrophotography called sequator, it allows you to align, stack light frames. then use Gimp for your editing averaging. I am sure there are a ton of free options, nothing beats Photoshop though. Nothing!
 
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