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Hi guys, a few months ago, my father-in-law gave me his vintage Omega when he learned of my interest in watches. The info I have is that he bought it for $200 in Vietnam in 1967. He had it serviced a few times but it is on the original bracelet. I do have some watch tools but have yet to open a caseback and would like to avoid it if possible, though I know that a shot of the movement would be extremely helpful. I know that these watches were known as "pie pans" or "connie's" but know little else about them or my particular watch. I apologize for the poor quality of pics but my lens on the Nikon seems finicky tonight. Any additional information on this watch would be great. Would 1967 be the likely year this watch was made. Thanks.:-!




 

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You have a gold capped (kind like very thick gold plating) Constellation 168.005, and it was a 60's watch for sure. The edges of the pie pan are crisp and the hands are the correct length so it does look original. Not sure about that crown though. The bracelet is called a Beads of Rice. Nice heirloom! If you can advance the date by pushing and pulling the crown it has a caliber 564, if you can only advance the date by rotating the hands it's a caliber 561. The serial number on the movement will tell the year it was made.
 

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A very nice heirloom watch. Our Phillies Fan gave you more detail than I could. But I will note for $100-200 you can have the watch serviced by a local watchmaker. Or an Omega AD can do it for about $450. This watch is too nice not to be serviced!
 

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In my mind, that is one of the most desirable vintage Omega model/bracelet combinations, especially if it has the 564 movement.
 

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Yes, and you have a really nice seven row beads of rice bracelet. Lovely patina on the dial - do nothing to change that. An occasional service (every five to six years) will ensure that this watch is an heirloom well into he future.

I am thinking that a 67 watch bought in Vietnam will probably be a cal 561 which has the non quick-set date.

You must kiss your father-in-law on the cheek for having given you such an iconic model - 168.005!

Cheers

desmond
 

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Nice Omega, even if this watch has the 561 movement it is still 'quick set'
even though it is not commonly called such.

The quick set mechanism on the 561 means that you don't have to advance
the watch 24hrs just to gain a day on the date. Simply wind the watch back to
nine oclock and advance until the date clicks over and then repeat....this was
a quick set mechanism in its day and is still reasonably quick.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you guys so much for the info! Sorry for the delay in response but work has been busy and the site was down last night when I checked. You guys are awesome!:-!

It is a caliber 561 where you have to advance the date by moving the hands. After hearing your responses I am definitely going to get this watch serviced and you guys have really sparked my interest in learning more about vintage watches! Thanks again:thanks:-!
 

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Sorry to disagree but cal 561 has never been called 'quick set' by Omega in its official calibre records. In fact, the first CORR (translated - rapid or quick set) calibres mentioned in Omega records were cals 563, 564 and 565.

I agree that cal 561 had an easier and more efficient date setting mechanism, but if we are to be really pedantic then we must make a distinction between the 27.90 RA SC PC AM CAL 561 and the 27.90 RA SC PC CAL CORR 564.

So it is correct to call the 564 a quickset and not correct to call a 561 a quickset

Cheers

Desmond

Nice Omega, even if this watch has the 561 movement it is still 'quick set'
even though it is not commonly called such.

The quick set mechanism on the 561 means that you don't have to advance
the watch 24hrs just to gain a day on the date. Simply wind the watch back to
nine oclock and advance until the date clicks over and then repeat....this was
a quick set mechanism in its day and is still reasonably quick.
 

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Your argument is certainly valid but calibers that can be advanced by turning back to 10:00 or 9:30 should be differentiated from those that can not.
 

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Sorry to disagree but cal 561 has never been called 'quick set' by Omega in its official calibre records. In fact, the first CORR (translated - rapid or quick set) calibres mentioned in Omega records were cals 563, 564 and 565.

I agree that cal 561 had an easier and more efficient date setting mechanism, but if we are to be really pedantic then we must make a distinction between the 27.90 RA SC PC AM CAL 561 and the 27.90 RA SC PC CAL CORR 564.

So it is correct to call the 564 a quickset and not correct to call a 561 a quickset

Cheers

Desmond
No problem, I expected disagreement for my use of the term 'quick set'
applied to the cal561.

My only concern was to clarify the 561's quick setting mechanism
compared to a non quick setting mechanism as applied to other watches
where changing the date meant advancing the hands a full 24hrs.

If it's not correct to call the cal561's quick setting mechanism quick set
would 'fast set' be OK? What did Omega call it?

As Nsmike pointed out, I think it is important to make a distinction or
the uninitiated reading that their watch is not 'quick set' may miss out
on the quick setting feature of the 561...which I agree is different from
other quick setting mechanisms.

I agree that distinctions need to be made between the different types
of quick setting cals but to say that one cal is quick set whilst the 561 is
not, is not strictly true.
 

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No problem, I expected disagreement for my use of the term 'quick set'
applied to the cal561.

My only concern was to clarify the 561's quick setting mechanism
compared to a non quick setting mechanism as applied to other watches
where changing the date meant advancing the hands a full 24hrs.

If it's not correct to call the cal561's quick setting mechanism quick set
would 'fast set' be OK? What did Omega call it?

As Nsmike pointed out, I think it is important to make a distinction or
the uninitiated reading that their watch is not 'quick set' may miss out
on the quick setting feature of the 561...which I agree is different from
other quick setting mechanisms.

I agree that distinctions need to be made between the different types
of quick setting cals but to say that one cal is quick set whilst the 561 is
not, is not strictly true.
I think that most users would equate quickset with either the crown-push or crown twist with hands disconnected method for advancing the date. It's a stretch to call the 9:00/12:00 method quickset when one has to go from 1 to 31. I've heard it called wig-wag which at least describes the hand action.

Circling back to the O.P., that is a really attractive pie-pan watch. Possibly Omega's best design.
 

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I think that most users would equate quickset with either the crown-push or crown twist with hands disconnected method for advancing the date.
True, but I would think 'most users' would be unfamiliar with the earlier
systems in vintage watches, which were designed to speed up the process.
At the time this watch was made, this was a faster superior system
to many others.
Omega owner manuals, which cover this type of 'quicker setting', describe it as a "Special device which makes this operation (changing the date)
extremely easy".


It's a stretch to call the 9:00/12:00 method quickset when one has to go from 1 to 31. I've heard it called wig-wag which at least describes the hand action.Circling back to the O.P., that is a really attractive pie-pan watch. Possibly Omega's best design.
Could we safely call it 'fairly quick set' or 'moderately quick set'?

I accept that it isn't as quick to set as a more modern watch but I
believe that it should be differentiated from date watches which
have no special mechanism at all to speed up the process.
 

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True, but I would think 'most users' would be unfamiliar with the earlier
systems in vintage watches, which were designed to speed up the process.
At the time this watch was made, this was a faster superior system
to many others.
Omega owner manuals, which cover this type of 'quicker setting', describe it as a "Special device which makes this operation (changing the date)
extremely easy".




Could we safely call it 'fairly quick set' or 'moderately quick set'?

I accept that it isn't as quick to set as a more modern watch but I
believe that it should be differentiated from date watches which
have no special mechanism at all to speed up the process.
How about a wig-wag-not-slow-but-not-quick date setting mechanism?:-d

I agree the old armstrong date setting method was a pain and the newer method must have been seen as a big improvement back then. Although one could speed the process with a 3/8" electric drill...:-d
 

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Agree that distinctions need to be made between manual and quick-setting.

The usual distinction is that quick-set is a system of advancing the date without having to move the hands. So other systems that require hand movement are usually called 'manual setting'.

Wig-wag is as good as any...and I've heard others, such as "advance-retard setting" and even "manual quick date setting" rather than the "quick-set" which is a generally accepted term, as I say, for date setting without moving the hands.

Cheers

Desmond
 

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Thank you for that clarification Desmond.

I like that term "manual quick date setting" and will remember to
use it in future.

That is a great site you have produced and is a boon for the constellation owner.
The best on the internet, without a doubt. I've used it many times...thank you.
 
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