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Discussion Starter #1
Good day everyone. My father-in-law just showed me this Waltham pocket watch that was his grandfather's.

If anyone has any information on it, I would greatly appreciate it!

The time sets but it doe not wind. It seems to be in great shape otherwise.

If I get it serviced, what should I ask for and expect and for how much?

I assume I want to keep everything original and have nothing replaced. Is this possible?

Thanks!

photo.JPG photo 2.JPG
 

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Nice watch. Probably 1920s. We'll figure out exactly how old when we see closeup shots of the watch movement (the little engine inside that goes ticky-tick-tick).

What happens when you take your watch to a watchmaker is that he pulls the watch apart and he puts it into a machine called an ultrasonic cleaner.

The ultrasonic cleaner is a box full of water (and possibly, other cleaning agents). The machine is turned on and pulsations move through the water to agitate it. The agitations work on the pieces of the watch inside the water and shake off any gunk and crap stuck onto them which would be impossible for conventional cleaning to remove (inaccessible places, too small, too hard to remove otherwise, etc).

The watch-components are then removed from the ultrasonic bath. They're dried. And then the watch is reassembled and lubricated with oil.

The watch is then wound up and tested and regulated for accuracy.

Provided that the watch itself is not broken, but simply full of gunk and dust, and nothing has worn out, then all the watchmaker has to do is clean it, reassemble, lube and regulate.

IF something does need replacing, pray that it's something that needs replacing all the time. Like a mainspring or a jewel. That shouldn't cost too much more. If it's an actual watch-component (a wheel, a cog, a balance-staff) it could cost significantly more.

Every watchmaker has his own prices, so I couldn't help you there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Shangas, thanks for your help. I will call my watchmaker tomorrow and hopefully get it dropped off this week. I plan to get some pictures of the movement if I can get them to open it while I am there. Have a good week.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nice watch. Probably 1920s. We'll figure out exactly how old when we see closeup shots of the watch movement (the little engine inside that goes ticky-tick-tick).

What happens when you take your watch to a watchmaker is that he pulls the watch apart and he puts it into a machine called an ultrasonic cleaner.

The ultrasonic cleaner is a box full of water (and possibly, other cleaning agents). The machine is turned on and pulsations move through the water to agitate it. The agitations work on the pieces of the watch inside the water and shake off any gunk and crap stuck onto them which would be impossible for conventional cleaning to remove (inaccessible places, too small, too hard to remove otherwise, etc).

The watch-components are then removed from the ultrasonic bath. They're dried. And then the watch is reassembled and lubricated with oil.

The watch is then wound up and tested and regulated for accuracy.

Provided that the watch itself is not broken, but simply full of gunk and dust, and nothing has worn out, then all the watchmaker has to do is clean it, reassemble, lube and regulate.

IF something does need replacing, pray that it's something that needs replacing all the time. Like a mainspring or a jewel. That shouldn't cost too much more. If it's an actual watch-component (a wheel, a cog, a balance-staff) it could cost significantly more.

Every watchmaker has his own prices, so I couldn't help you there.
Please see pics below. Sorry for the quality. Any help is appreciated!

PW 3.JPG PW 4.JPG
 

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Had to look hard to find your serial no on the movement looks like 26675415 from the NAWCC data base I found this about your watch.From that serial no your watch was made around 1928.So now you got a little info on your watch.
Start: End:
First:26675001 Last:26681000
Model:1894Name:
Material:U Grade:No. 225,
Size:12Size:12
Plate:3/4Plate:
Jewelling: Jewels:17
Balance: Bal:Breguet Spring
Style:OF
Style:
O.F.​
Comment:105
Source:
Date:

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Had to look hard to find your serial no on the movement looks like 26675415 from the NAWCC data base I found this about your watch.From that serial no your watch was made around 1928.So now you got a little info on your watch.
Start:
End:
First:
26675001
Last:
26681000
Model:
1894
Name:
Material:
U
Grade:
No. 225,
Size:
12
Size:
12
Plate:
3/4
Plate:
Jewelling:
Jewels:
17
Balance:
Bal:
Breguet Spring
Style:
OF

Style:

O.F.​
Comment:
105
Source:

Date:


River Rat, I very much appreciate it!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Nice watch. Probably 1920s. We'll figure out exactly how old when we see closeup shots of the watch movement (the little engine inside that goes ticky-tick-tick).

What happens when you take your watch to a watchmaker is that he pulls the watch apart and he puts it into a machine called an ultrasonic cleaner.

The ultrasonic cleaner is a box full of water (and possibly, other cleaning agents). The machine is turned on and pulsations move through the water to agitate it. The agitations work on the pieces of the watch inside the water and shake off any gunk and crap stuck onto them which would be impossible for conventional cleaning to remove (inaccessible places, too small, too hard to remove otherwise, etc).

The watch-components are then removed from the ultrasonic bath. They're dried. And then the watch is reassembled and lubricated with oil.

The watch is then wound up and tested and regulated for accuracy.

Provided that the watch itself is not broken, but simply full of gunk and dust, and nothing has worn out, then all the watchmaker has to do is clean it, reassemble, lube and regulate.

IF something does need replacing, pray that it's something that needs replacing all the time. Like a mainspring or a jewel. That shouldn't cost too much more. If it's an actual watch-component (a wheel, a cog, a balance-staff) it could cost significantly more.

Every watchmaker has his own prices, so I couldn't help you there.
I just received the quote from my watchmaker. $595 for a complete service including a new mainspring. This comes with a 1-year warranty. This seems steep to me, but I do not know anything about servicing pocket watches.

Any advice?
 

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Retrieve your watch and run from that watchmaker who is an overpriced crook. Sounds like a jeweler who sends watches out to be serviced and then charges 2-3 times what it should cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Retrieve your watch and run from that watchmaker who is an overpriced crook. Sounds like a jeweler who sends watches out to be serviced and then charges 2-3 times what it should cost.
My local watchmaker charges 40 dollars to clean and oil a watch.

JDT
I am going to pick it up ASAP. Thanks for the help. On top of all this, I may have to pay an evaluation fee of like $90. I am an idiot.

Anyone recommend a good repair person in Atlanta?
 
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