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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I inherited this stopwatch from my father. I know nothing about it and would just like to learn what I can. I don't imagine it's valuable but do appreciate a precise timepiece. I think it's pretty cool. I'm not sure how to open the case so that'd be a great place to start if someone could nudge me in the right direction! What about years, origin, etc..? I suppose I probably need to get inside it first and get you pictures of the movement.
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Thank you
 

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I reckon this is a snap-back case. There'll be a small notch. Use a proper ( dull! ) blade, & simply push it straight in...that's frequently all it takes. Sometimes, it seems necessary to wiggle the blade a bit, but, be careful not to chew-into the case. This black case is unusual in that any damage done in opening will be perfectly apparent.

Stopwatch cases generally seem difficult to open & put back together...proceed carefully!

Michael.
 

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Pretty cool.

This appears to be a 1/100 s movement such that the central hand would rotate once every second, and the seconds would increment the sub-dial.

Not sure about the crown extension, but I’m guessing that may be so that the stopwatch can be operated somewhat remotely by a mechanical connection to something else to trigger it?

Maybe timing machinery cycles or something similar?

I’m not sure, but I would date this approximately early 70’s to fall between the Micrograph and the quartz/digital replacement...


SoOoO many watches SoOoO little time...
 

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Nice set up, but not sure on the holder. Adjustable screw at top, so thinking button at bottom. Lifts the entire watch so crown connects with screw to start, stop and reset

As a whole. No idea on value. Lower priced model which only times 60 seconds, so under 1 minute events

Found this one on Pinterest, but led to a finished and long gone Ebay auction



DON
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys! Here are a few pictures of the side. I do NOT see a small notch anywhere
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
1st pic just below your finger i can see a gap.
Yep, I didn't notice it myself until I was looking at the picture on a big monitor. Hard to see in person. That's on the front of the watch though, so I assume it's not an intentional gap but rather the case separating/failing?
 

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Yep, I didn't notice it myself until I was looking at the picture on a big monitor. Hard to see in person. That's on the front of the watch though, so I assume it's not an intentional gap but rather the case separating/failing?
Im in agreeance that both covers are snap on, but your right that was the front.
 

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Fisher Scientific and VWR Scientific are competing scientific equipment/supply vendors so the pict with a VWR dial stopwatch and Fisher base is a sort of a “franken” set up. The other picture in the thread shows the Fisher stopwatch with the Fisher base. My guess is your dad was a scientist working in a lab. These types of timers were replaced with digital models probably in the late 70’s/80’s.


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Yep, I didn't notice it myself until I was looking at the picture on a big monitor. Hard to see in person. That's on the front of the watch though, so I assume it's not an intentional gap but rather the case separating/failing?
Although I don't know this watch, I will suggest that if there's no notch on the back--but one on the front--then perhaps the movement comes out through the front.

I find it a bit difficult to imagine that the space you see on the front between the bezel and case, is not a place for an opening tool. I have seen & opened a few hundred (!) cases on many USA and European and Asian over the years, and, what I'm seeing in your picture is 'exactly' what I've seen over & over again: a space for an opener.

Then again: always keep in mind that not all things are designed to be 'User Serviceable'. Just look at the screw-back on your average Rolex...without a really-well fitting die and the tool it fits in, you're just about out of luck. You may be looking at something similar here: although the bezel may pop-off without much fuss, reinstalling it may be the reverse; Heuer may have used a special tool to snap it all together, and the crystal may not survive a Non-Official attempt.

Michael.
 
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