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Re: Facinating! I think you are the first balloon pilot to weigh in here....

FAR 91.205 (d) [/COLOR][/COLOR] (6) A clock displaying hours, minutes, and seconds with a sweep-second pointer or digital presentation.

Yep, required equipment. Good thing I always fly with a watch! :-d
Very interesting. :-! Is there a link to that regulation?
 

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Nice post!

Ski gliding the Eiger is the most insane thing I think I have seen in a long time. Not a sport conducive to prolonged life!
 

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I've been flying with this or a Sunto Vector sometimes. Before both of those was a Citizen Nighthawk. UTC is a HUGE issue for a pilot watch...so I have to set the Vector to GMT.

 

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That's a great shot Maxstatic! I really like that Doxa model,any idea where I could pick one up and how much it would cost? I looked on the Doxa website and that model does not appear...

Cheers,

S.
 

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Only place to get them now is from Doxa direct as they haven't hit AD yet. I PM you link. ;-)
 

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Student pilot, and former Army Aeroscout. Mostly a 1987 Seiko Quartz chrono. Occasionally a Casio digital. I have to say I used the chrono and bezel all the time in flight, but never used any of the same functions on the digital. The Seiko is extremely durable and accurate to about 1 or 2 seconds per month. I frequently get Rolex and Breitling owners complimenting this watch. I just picked up another in trade.

I have one of those Seikos! I got it for my 18th in 1987 and wore it everyday until about 5 years ago. The bracelet broke on it and it got tossed into a box and replaced with other watches over the years. This is the first time that I have ever seen one posted anywhere! I love that watch. It is back in Canada, but when I go home, I am going to have it serviced and bring it back into my rotation.

Flightpath, thank you for the information about the watch. I had no idea about what it was called or any details about it. Now I know what I have. :)

This brought a smile to my face. This was my first "real" watch. Ahhh the memories.

Cheers,

Jay
 

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It brought a smile to my face too.
I'm about your age (I was 18 in 1986), and one of my buddies wore that watch. I used to admire it. It was the first chronograph that I saw in person that I thought looked really sharp.
 

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During my military days (late 60's), the first "alarm" watch, a Seiko "Bell-Matic" I bought in Hong Kong for fifty bucks brand new. Later, as a civilian and when I could afford it, a Breitling Navitimer. Semi-retired now and not flying anymore. These days, the best all around aviation watch IMHO is of course the one I wear most often and it is shown below... ;-) :-!
Cheers,
Ron





 

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flew with my new one yesterday

 

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In my experience dealing with what watch to wear while flying, what I need vs what I want are often at odds. For the purposes of the thread I'll stick to what is needed. For me first and foremost is durability and accuracy. The watch will take a lot of hits gearing up and gearing down, as well as abrupt movements/impacts in the cockpit during things like BFM. If you look at any fighter cockpit there are paint chips/worn spots and dents all over the place. This is from years of heavily equipped aviators strapping in and egressing as well as rapid body positioning (think checking 6). Susceptibility to cracking/scratches is something that would steer me away from a watch that gets real use. For night flying, backlight is a must. Granted I'm pulling 90% of my data off of the GPS display, but if waiting for a formation start time or check in time in the dark or under a shelter, then the backlight is required. Lume hands just have not cut it for me at this point. As for accuracy, any of your quartz options will be sufficient. I'm an accuracy tyrant and hack whatever I am wearing to the nuclear observatory clock every day (if the watch requires it). Also, at the opening of the brief, ideally the flight lead has a nuclear hack and we all hack to him. That way we are all on the same page. I've flown with autos before and I'm just not comfortable banging them around and trusting of their accuracy after pulling repeated 9G break turns. As for the utility of fuel calculations or time/distance, I can see where it is great to have as a backup but Id just as soon use the back of my lineup card and do the math right instead of relying on tiny watch numbers. Your mileage may vary. I realize that the kind of flying I do is not the norm or the standard but it does generate some data points to take into consideration.

For all the heavy type pilots I've run across, it is a wide variation, but I see a lot of strong digital watches capable of easy time zone transition. Since they are all about GLOBAL mobility this is an important feature to them. Also a strong alarm for crew rest type situations. For fighter guys, G-Shock and Breitling/Bremont own the market. G-Shock because you can't kill them, and Breitling/Bremont because of the prestige of having a custom made watch with HERITAGE and style (usually with your jet's profile on the watch face), as well as the fact that those specific brands are tough. Number one most observed is the Breitling Aerospace. Side note, the Bremont auto owners complain about having to re-hack them all the time because of not wearing constantly, this diminishes the utility. Aerospace owners rarely have to re-hack FWIW. Late add...Citizens are making large inroads into the fighter pilot market.

Personal choices, I fly with a G-Shock Aviation GW3000BB-1A or the desert DW6900SD-8. Both tough as nails and in the case of the former: Solar charged, atomic hacking, and rated to +12Gs. I'll typically pick up the latter for night flights due to the backlight. Any G would be a solid choice to whatever suited your needs. Ive flown with a Hamilton Pilot Auto in the past and it held up just fine but I was never sold on the accuracy (+10 seconds per day). I know it's nitpicky but thats just me. I also felt guilty about the abuse it might take so I leave it at home now.

Here are a couple pictures of both in action from a few years ago. Cool effect losing my cranium huh?

Cheers.


DSC01701.jpg GOPR0006.JPG IMG_2819.jpg
 

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Holy thread re-boot, batman!

Blue skies,
-only jake
 

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Same questions are still being asked so figured why not add them to an established thread Haha


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Its funny reading this post as my answer has changed significantly since the last time I considered it.

I posted this in early 2013 I think:

Just finished an 11 Hour duty (Airline Captain) - I have bored people - and myself - to death about the "Digital Watch is the best thing for a pilot" debate, but I keep coming back to it. I prefer real watches, but it is impossible to beat a digital for practical purposes in aviation..........!
Alarms, Timezones, Stopwatch, but most of all - INSTANT ability to tell ACCURATE time!
I think I have settled on a 'G-Shock for work, Real timepiece for leasure/pleasure' policy......................:)
I do not disagree with those sentiments now, but I have not worn a GShock in years. I am now a fan of automatics, specifically divers. They can take a few knocks, usually have excellent readability by day and night, and I just find quartz digitals a bit cheap and dare I say it - kinda "soulless".

In no particular order....


IWC Schaffausen Aquatimer 2000, a grail, a keeper - a bit blingy at times.



Christopher Ward C600. No longer produced, the Company is moving in a different direction these days, and the pricing policy/styling are no longer to my tastes, but I love this watch.



SAS SEA "Dubh Linn"Edition. Absolutely superb quality for the price point. Ticks every box, build/lume/legibility - love this brand. Actually looking at that pic it doesn't do the watch justice,



My current brand new darling on the flight deck is a Mileata M2, I meant to take pics today but never got around to it. I'll put some up on the "Timepieces in the Flightdeck" thread tomorrow. I LOVE this watch.....!



So there you have it. Digitals are possibly more practical, but I am drawn to automatic divers. The aircraft I fly has 2 digital clocks hardwired to GPS for accuracy - A solid automatic with character keeps me happy these days..........
 

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Does any pilot here have a Gavox? Would you wear one? Designed for the Belgium Air Force.

 

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Firstly I'd like to apologise to any non-pilots on WUS I may have offended by asking for the opinions of pilots only in this thread. It was brought to my attention by the moderators that this may be the case.
That is really weird. Kind of like not wanting actual scuba divers to comment on what dive watch they use. Very perplexing.

Back to the the topic at hand.

For those pilots that fly with mechanical watches...

1.) How do you ensure your watch is accurate each time you fly? I cross check with the aircraft clock, cell phone, and GPS.

2.) What is the maximum stated variation in your watch's accuracy? I don't know.

3.) What is the average observed variation in your watch's accuracy? Depends on what I am wearing. No more than five seconds plus/minus.

4.) Do you prefer manual wind or automatic movements? Why? No preference, but most of my watches are automatics.
 
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