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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
First post!

Recently acquired a handful of Casio Databank DBC / DBX watches, and wanted to write down what I've found out for others to follow. I believe DBC means "Data Bank Calculator", as they all have an alphanumeric keypad for entering in numbers and text. Since the DBC watches have the keypad, it makes sense to add a calculator for "free". These differ from the Casio DB watches, which require you enter in each character individually by cycling through with two large front buttons.

Here's my DBC-60, which I believe is the first DBC watch released:
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I believe this is the original strap that came with this watch. The official replacement straps didn't have the "Casio" and "Data Bank" writing. Casio replacement bands commonly lacked printing on them. Casio also released the DBC-600 and DBC-600G, the silver and gold plated models with the stainless linked bracelets:
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These three watches use the 563 module, and I think they are the only Casios to do so. They came out in 1985 as far as I can tell. The keypad wears easily, and most are destroyed by fingernails over the years. Take a look at used models and see, most are in bad shape. The one here is in good condition believe it or not. Mine is usable, but feels soft and mushy. I don't know if it came that way or it's happened by age, but I try not use use it. The 563 module let you store up to 50 telememo records and scheduled dates, sharing the same memory. Telememos could have up to 9 characters of text input with the keypad, and 12 digits of numbers. The DBC watches have a 'secret' function - you can password protect some values using the "secret data area". Password protect values using a 4 digital password, resetting the password erases the secret values. The schedule function lets you store dates and times and give a 12 character label. The displays shows any day where you have an appointment in the next two weeks. The appointments automatically delete once the day has passed A hidden function - hold adjust/mode/secret buttons at the same time to see all LCD elements.The "INV" button activates a small microlight, and is unlabeled as such.

Why was '60' was used for this first model, even though it stored 50 records? Casio tried not to have similar lines of watches share the same number, even if prefixes differed. Casio databanks included the DB-20, DB-30, CD-40, and DB-50. DBC-60 appears to be the next available in the sequence, adding the C for some additional description.

1988 saw the release of the DBX-100 and DBX-100G series with the 261 module:

The DBX-100 was silver with a stainless bracelet, the DBX-100G was gold plated. The DBX-100 was overall a similar style to the DBC-60, but is a different case with all 4 side buttons next to the keypad, with a larger fully dot-matrix display. One could store up to 100 telememo records of 8 characters and 12 digits, or 65 scheduled dates with 16 character messages, or 61 regular memos of 24 characters. Memos were searchable, and the dot matrix display could display a weeks view of schedule with start and end times graphed out. It is perhaps the most advanced display on any DBC/DBX watch. No other watch used this display or 261 module. Sadly, most of these watches have their keypads absolutely obliterated. It's rare to find one in good condition, and if found I would not want to use it for fear of wearing it. DBX seems to mean "Data Base eXtended", or expanded, or extra. The typical Data Bank stored 50 records, the DBX watches stored 100 records. Perhaps that is why all the DBX models start with 100 (I can only see that the DBX-100, DBX-101, DBX-110, DBX-102, DBX-112, and DBX-103 exist). The DBX-101 and DBX-110 share the same module and are more closely tied with the classic Casio DB line, and are not discussed here. The DBX-102, DBX-112, and DBX-103 are discussed later on.

1989 saw the DBC-61, DBC-610, and DBC-610G models, using an improved 676 module:
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The DBC-61 is the black resin model, the DBC-610 is the silver plated with stainless bracelet, and the DBC-610G is the gold plated with gold stainless IP bracelet. Interestingly, some of these seem to have water resist while others don't. The water resistant models say "WR" below the screen instead of the '&':
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The model number seems to be the same, though I think these are the DBC-61-1A models released in 1992. I'm not sure what the WR DBC-610 is, and I can't find photos of a WR DBC-610G. These water resist models would be the only water resist DBC Casios ever made, even over 30 years later. I don't have one to show you here, I'm using pictures I've found elsewhere. They use a slightly different case than the DBC-60/DBC-600, it's different at the top if you look closely. The top part on the DBC-60 integrates well with the resin band, but doesn't match the bracelet. On the DBC-61, the top part is flat and fits the DBC-610 and DBC-610G models better, but doesn't fit the DBC-61 resin band as well.

The 676 module improves upon the 563 by adding a countdown timer and a world time function. The display is also improved. The key was moved to where the fixed "sig" and "al." used to be. "AM" and "PM" were replaced with smaller "A" and "P", and was moved lower down. This let the dot matrix portion of the display extend further left, and has no gaps between characters. There's also a colon added to the date section, to allow for viewing the local time in world time mode. The fixed portion of the display also has gridlines between days. The enhanced display lets you see more characters in data bank mode, but also persistently displays the year when you're in timekeeping mode.

1991 saw the release of the DBC-62, continuing with the 676 module:
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The module may have remained the same, but the case and keypad were vastly improved from a flat membrane to a rubber segmented one. There also appears to be a DBC-62-9G (released later in 1994), with a gold tinted display and gold lettering.
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The DBC-62 doesn't appear to have a DBC-620 and DBC-620G counterpart, perhaps because the DBX-102 and DBX-112 filled that role. These shared the same case design as the DBC-62, but used an upgraded 642 module. The 642 module has a storage capacity of 100 records instead of the 50 records in the 676. They seem to use the same display and have the same functionality, but lack a microlight. The DBX-102 had been released in 1990, the DBX-112 in 1991. At some point they ditched the DBX line, perhaps it would be confusing to use a different letter for models with different quantities of records. The later DBC-30, DBC-80, DBC-150, DBC-300 lines would have all needed a different prefix.

My DBX-102:
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Note the updated display of the 642 module (Which I believe it shares with the 676), I used the same hidden function to fill all segments. While this DBX-102 seems to share the same case as the DBC-62, the crystal and the keypad have different arrangements and coloring. The rubber keypad is much better to use than the earlier models, and also appears to be more durable. Used models mostly seem to be intact. I believe this band is also original, where the lower portion says DATA BANK, but the upper part no longer says "Casio" like it does on my DBC-60. Interestingly, the rear stainless panel is painted over in black on the DBX-102. I've not seen many Casios that paint the rear panel, and cannot think of what benefit that gives. We see from my picture how that turns out.

My DBX-112:
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The DBX-112 has a similar crystal and the same keypad as the DBX-102, with the same shape case as both the DBC-62 and DBX-102, but this time in grey resin. It's the only databank I can see that doesn't paint/plate the premium model that comes with bracelet. It almost seems like they forgot, but grey/beige was popular at the time I guess. You can see that the rear stainless plate is painted grey too. Again, not sure why. The bracelet has small polished sections between the links, differing from the DBC-600 and DBC-610 models. There doesn't seem to be a gold DBX-112G model either. I could polish this crystal up a bit, but the lighting is making all these watches look worse than they really do.

1994 saw the release of the DBX-103, which I do not have. It's peculiar in that it seems to use the same 642 module as the DBX-102 and DBX-112, but a new case and keypad design:
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It doesn't seem to share that case or keypad with any other Casio. There is no DBX-113 or DBX-113G. The DBX-103 forgoes a keypad and instead uses an array of buttons. It appears to be more durable than that used on the DBC-62 / DBX-102 / DBX-112. The DBX-103 is not a 100 record version of the DBC-63, as the naming could imply. The DBC-63 is a different watch entirely.

Enter the DBM-150 and DBM-151:
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Released in 1994 and 1995, respectively, both used the 1079 module. It's very hard to find any real information on these watches, but they appear to be the only ones using this module or style of case. I believe they're also the first to use the "Telememo 150" branding. The light button is on the side, and the secret/c button moves to the face of the watch. It does appear to use the same keypad style as the DBX-103. The biggest advance with the DBM models appears to be the "Memory Protection" feature. Up until now, the DBC and DBX models required continual power to preserve the memory data. A battery replacement done incorrectly would wipe all data. DBC and DBX models up until this point appear to have two batteries, and it is necessary to replace one at a time so as to not clear out memory. The DBM models use an EEPROM to store data, and use a single battery. I believe DBM stands for "Data Bank with Memory Protect". It's also the first Data Bank with 150 records capacity, perhaps this was Casio continuing to change the prefix letters as capacity changed. It's also unclear why the DBM-151 is not named the DBM-1500. Regardless, these models seem quickly replaced.

My DBC-63B, featuring Electro Luminescence:
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Released in 1995, the DBC-63 used the 1276 module and continued with having 50 records of storage. It's now branded as the "Telememo 50" model, corresponding to the 50 records of storage. The main improvement with the DBC-63 is the addition of the illuminator function, Casio's elecro-luminescent backlight. The light button on the front activates the EL backlight, the piece of plastic to the left just says "illuminator" and is not a button even though it looks like one. The one I have works great, but is a bit beat up on the front, it's also missing the correct band. The LCD had to move the chime and alarm segments to make room for the EL display, indicating that alarms would flash the light. The DBC-63 uses black buttons, the DBC-63B uses buttons that glow in the dark, what you see here. There's also the DBC-630A and DBC-630BA (Usually just listed as DBC-630), that use the same case shape and 1276 module, just are chrome plated and use a bracelet:
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The DBC-630BA model has the glowing keypad just like the DBC-63. The DBC-63 seems to have been a huge success, as over 2 dozen models seem to have been released between 1995 and 1998. There were special editions and lots of translucent models in varying colors.

1995 also saw the release of the DBC-30, DBC-30G, DBC-300, and DBC-300G lineup of watches with the 1253 module, the "Telememo 30" line. These were the only 4 Telememo 30 models released. These had a similar style to the DBC-63/630, but very different functionality. The DBC-30 and DBC-30G were black resin:
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My DBC-300:
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The DBC-300G is the only gold plated later-year model that I've seen:
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The 1253 module in addition to only having storage for 30 records, lost the scheduling ability other DBC models had up to this point - it could not store times and dates. It also loses the world time function, but gains 5 alarms. You are able to store Telememo numbers as either fax #s or telephone numbers for organization. The fact that these were the only 4 models made suggests it was not a big seller.

1996 saw an explosion of the DBC line of watches. The Telememo 80 line included the DBC-80 / DBC-800, and the DBC-81 / DBC-810 using modules 1486 and 1476 respectively. The Telememo 150 line included the DBC-150 / DBC-1500 using the 1477 module, and the Telememo 300 line included the DBC-310 / DBC-3000 the 1478 module. The number of records the watch stored is reflected in the model number for all but the DBC-6x lineup, for historical reasons as outlaid above.

I believe the mid '90s was the peak of Databank popularity, as they had come down in price, improved in functionality, and cell phones that stored names and numbers were not yet commonplace. These were life savers in the age of using whatever landline or payphone was nearby. The Telememo 80, 150, and 300 models had a similar style and all list "Memory Protect", which means they use an EEPROM for secure data storage. I do not have any of the Telememo 80 nor Telememo 300 models, take a look at my follow-up reply with all the models I could find online!

I do have a Telememo 150, a DBC-1500B:
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The display appears the same as any Telememo 50, 80, 150, and 300 model. There were many Telememo 150 models released in different styles and colors, including the DBC-1500B seen here. Look at my follow-up reply to see more!

Some other notable DBC models include the "Easy Rec" DBC-V50 and DBC-V500, 1999's voice memo Data Bank models using the 1591 module.
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The DBC-W150 and DBC-W1500 were released in 2001, and added Waveceptor (Casio's radio-sync atomic time technology), using the 2296 module. The DBC-W151 with module 2298 also exists for the Japanese market. This was before Multiband 5 technology, so different modules were used in different regions around the world. There may be other models for other regions.
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2004 - 2008 saw the release of the DBC-32 lineup, contemporary models using the 2888 module. See my follow-up reply for more information!

One last model to talk about. An exciting "retro" release happened in 2011, when Casio released the DBC-611 and DBC-611G:
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Here's my DBC-611G, which I believe is the last DBC watch released:
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The DBC-611 (silver) and DBC-611G (gold) models were released in 2011 with the 3228 module, and is still available for purchase new. This most recent Data Bank Calculator watch brings the DBC line full circle over 25 years later, borrowing the case design of the DBC-60 (actually the DBC-61 looking at the top of the case). While the model number only increments the DBC-610 by 1, it is in fact a very different watch. The display is entirely different from any other DBC watch, and the module is most similar to 2004's DBC-32. The 3228 module has all the features and functionality of the 2888, but with a different display designed to look more similar to the DBC-60/DBC-600/DBC-61/DBC-610 watches this is based on. Like the 2888, it only stores 25 records. It lacks the secret and schedule functionality, but adds the auto illuminator led-based light to this case style for the first time. The keypad may look cleaner, but it can no longer be used to enter in text. The Rev/Time and Tel/Fwd buttons are used to cycle through, much like the traditional DB series of watches. The keypad feels much stronger and easier to use than my DBC-60, it feels like it will not wear out nearly as easily. The "Multi Lingual" feature this advertises is not a translator, but merely an option to control the language used to display the day of the week on the dot matrix display, and the set of characters to use in data bank mode. While the data bank functionality on this watch is less featured than any other DBC watch, the need for a data bank watch in 2011 and beyond is seriously reduced with current phones. The DBC-611 exists as a retro piece with a cleaner keypad and more convenient illumination. More people will see it as a calculator watch rather than a way to store names and numbers. It also has 5 alarms instead of the typical 1, but it loses the count down timer. There is no black resin version of this watch either (What would they call it? The DBC-61.1?)

That's it for now, I'll update the above with new info if I acquire any more. I'd really like to get my own DBC-61, DBC-62, and DBX-103 to complete the vintage lineup, and of course would love a DBX-100 in good shape. Other than that, a gold DBC-300G or DBC-800G, a DBC-3000B and perhaps the Easy Rec models.

What do you think about the Casio DBC lineup? Do you think they will release more DBC models or is this the end of databank as we know it?

Credit to unnamed google image searches and digital-watch.com for the watches I don't have available to take photos of
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Hit the limit of attached photos. Expanding on the DBC-32 lineup here.

2004 saw the DBC-32-1A, DBC-32-9A, DBC-32C-1B, and DBC-32C-8B, contemporary models using the 2888 module:
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Despite the name indicating this would be a Telememo 30, it stores 25 records and is not branded with "Telememo" on it. Perhaps it was the closest model that fit. There is no DBC-31, perhaps trying to eliminate confusion with the DBC-310? 2005 followed up with the release of the DBC-32D-1A, the silver model with stainless bracelet (There is no DBC-320):
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2007 and 2008 saw the release of 6 additional models, the DBC-32C-1, DBC-32C-2, DBC-32C-3B, DBC-32C-4, DBC-32C-8, and DBC-32C9B:
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I feel these should have been named the DBC-25/DBC-250, personally. Some are still available new and are probably still being produced. They do not have any secret memo function or schedule function like other DBC watches up to this point. It does add led-based (not EL) auto-illumination, where light turns on at the turn of a wrist. They have 5 alarms, and no countdown timer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Expanding on the Telememo 80 and 300 series here. All appear to have been released in 1996, and share the same general visual appearance with the Telememo 150 series.

The Telememo 80 models with 1486 module seems to include only 3 models, none with glowing keypads - the DBC-80, DBC-800-1, and DBC-800G-1:
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The Telememo 80 models with the 1476 module seems to include the resin DBC-81-1, DBC-81B-1, and DBC-81G-9:
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There's also the bracelet models, the DBC-810, DBC-810G, and DBC-810B. I found a grey IP model, I'll call it the DBC-810B-8 for now. I cannot seem to find an exhaustive list, there may be others.
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All Telememo 80 models had a total of 80 records of storage. The 1476 module has the EL illuminator with backlight function, and the 1486 does not. The 1486-based DBC-80/800 models say "telememo & schedule" instead of "illuminator" on the dial, and have a "cal" button on front instead of a "light" button. In addition to being able to access the calculator with a few presses of the "mode" button, one can press the "cal" button to access it directly. I think the Telememo 80 series was originally a cost-reduced version of the Telememo 150, so this omission makes sense. Perhaps it sold poorly and Casio realized it needed a light after all, there don't seem to be many of them available used.

The Telememo 300 series was the highest capacity data bank calculators yet, with a total storage of 300 records. Only 3 models seem to have been released, the DBC-310-1, the DBC-310B-1, and DBC-3000B-1:
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They all use the 1478 module. I believe "DBC-310" had to be used for the black resin models, because "DBC-300" was already in use for the chrome-plated Telememo 30. There doesn't seem to be a DBC-3000 with dark buttons. In some ways the DBC-3000B is the pinnacle of the Data Bank Calculator series.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Expanding on the DBC-150/DBC-1500 lineup here.

1996's original release included the DBC-150-1, DBC-150B-1, DBC-150BT-1, DBC-150LT-1, and DBC-150T-1:
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1996 also saw the chrome models, the DBC-1500-1 and DBC-1500B-1:
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2005 saw the DBC-1500L-1 with leather:
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And lastly, 2009 saw the negative display models, the DBC-1500B-3C and DBC-1500B-7C:
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Expanding on the DBC-63/DBC-630 Telememo 50! There's a ton of these and it's hard to find a good reference for all of them. All appear to use the 1276 module. Just like the 676 module, up to 50 shared records of telememo or schedule could be stored. Telememo entries could be up to 9 alpha-numeric characters and up to 12 numerical digits, a scheduled item could be time, date, and up a 12 character reminder message. Only 6 characters displayed, longer messages scrolled. As described above, the DBC-63 also added electro-luminescent illuminator. Holding start/stop in timekeeping mode enabled a 'backlight' function where the EL would flash when an alarm or hourly signal went off. Perhaps a quarter of all DBC models made by Casio are in this series, I think it must have hit the right price and feature set at the right time.

1995 looks like it saw the original release of the DBC-63-1 and DBC-63B-1:
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The DBC-630A-1, and DBC-630BA-1 were also released. Refer to the original post above for images. I also found a special edition steel bracelet model, unsure of the model number or release date:
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1997 saw 9 special editions DBC-63NS models released (DBC-63NS-2, DBC-63NS-3, DBC-63NS-4, DBC-63NS-7A, DBC-63NS-7B, DBC-63NS-8A, DBC-63NS-8B, DBC-63NS-9A, DBC-63NS-9B). It's not clear what "NS" meant, but I believe these are the "Dino Zone" and perhaps also the "Cognit Schema" models.
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1998 saw 6 special edition DBC-63S models (DBC-63S-2, DBC-63S-3, DBC-63S-4, DBC-63S-7, DBC-63S-8, DBC-63S-9), which I believe are special editions, including some from "Hysteric Glamour", "Monda Style", and "Sophia". Would love to know what other people find.
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Also released are 9 special edition DBC-63MC models (DBC-63MC-2, DBC-63MC-2A, DBC-63MC-3, DBC-63MC-3A, DBC-63MC-4, DBC-63MC-7, DBC-63MC-8, DBC-63MC-8A, DBC-63MC-9). I can see that "MC" stands for "Micro Cosmos", but don't know more than that.
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Hunting down all the varieties of DBC-63 models seems like a full time pursuit for some, with facebook groups dedicated to the model. Would love if more people could share what they know here!
 

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Excellent write-up. Everything appears to be accurate, except for the minor note that on the DBC-60/600 watches the schedule memo only accepts 5 alpha inputs per page.
Also here are a few additions to the above models. I was eventually going to post these up but I may as well do it here:

Photo of DBC-30g. Basically a black resin version with gold accents and gold tinted LCD
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Also I believe the DBC-30 came in both a black version and dark gray version (both without the gold accents).

DBC-150 in "Gunmetal" gray with a stainless steel gunmetal band and Neobright keys (Casio's branding of their glowing keypad)
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DBC-1500g (with Neobright keys)
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The Wave Ceptor DBC-W151 series also had a gold version in Japan (with Neobright keys):
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These ones are models that deserve a mention being that they're Data Banks with calculators:
EDB-600 series and 610 series (the 610 series added a 4-time zone mode for the US time zones). Models were EDB-600-1V, EDB-600D-8, EDB-610-1C and EDB-610D-8C.
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ABC-30 Series (ABC-30-1EZDF, ABC-30-7B, ABC-30D-1ESDF, ABC-30D-1E)
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FTP-30 Flip Top (there were at least four variations)
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IA-1000 Flip Top (I believe there were four variations; two with a leather band and two with a gold-silver toned stainless steel band)
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Also of note: The DBC Easy Rec models were offered both with and without Neobright keys for the black resin and stainless steel versions, and the same holds true for the Wave Ceptor DBCs.

All in all, Casio were pretty innovative with so many different styles of watches that just about any afficionado could find something that suited their tastes. Too bad really that so many of these models are long gone from the store shelves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Excellent write-up. Everything appears to be accurate, except for the minor note that on the DBC-60/600 watches the schedule memo only accepts 5 alpha inputs per page.
Also here are a few additions to the above models. I was eventually going to post these up but I may as well do it here:
Wow, such great info DBCMan! There are some models that I just couldn't find any photos of, there's clearly a lot of extremely rare models with small production runs. I love the ABC models!
 

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The leather one pops up from time to time. They also made a leather banded DB-1500. I'm generally conflicted about buying leather products so I haven't added that one to my collection, at least not yet.

I've got a few more watches that I'll be adding to this thread, but in the meantime, I took the original data that is now missing from the other DBC thread and began expanding on it over the last few years. This is the updated table showing the various features and configurations for the Data Bank Calcs:

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A couple of data points are blank and I will fill them in as I figure them out.
 

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This is exactly the history I was looking for.

However, I'm trying to clarify my memories and I'm not sure if I'm remembering one watch or two that I had. I swear the watch I wore from '86-'92 or so was a DBC-60. I know that it had the secret function with the four digit code, as I recall using that to keep those important middle school secrets. However, I also recall the stylized "WR" inbetween Telememo and Schedule.

Is it possible that there were WR DBC-60s? Or am I most likely remembering two separate watches?
 

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Wow, this is the most comprehensive thread with amazing pictures I have ever found regarding the DBC series on the entire internet. Congrats to OP; your hard work and attention to detail shows!!

I still have my original 1985 "secret key" telememo50 dbc-60 but due to neglect the resin band has gotten sticky. I did find repro "casio" and "data bank" resin bands on ebay a ehile back, the font even looks similar to the original one.
I have a few of the silver clip band versions of that telememo50 but I find that those metal bands pull on arm hair a bit too much for my liking.

I also still have my favorite telememo-300 silver model, that one is my favorite.

Still rocking an Apple watch these days since I like the benefits of workout and exercise integration with the iphones, but every once in a while I still don the old vintage ones for fun.

Once again, thank you for posting this comprehensive list and explanation of all the different models.

PS - another factoid I learned is the multi-colored "Cosmos" ones have a very faint but noticable backdrop behind the LCD having micro-organisms and similar things, thats kinda cool. Attached to this post is an infosheet I found, alebit its a bit fuzzy and hard to read. It does show the backdrop (the red fuzzy things) somewhat.

-zepcom


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Wow, this is the most comprehensive thread with amazing pictures I have ever found regarding the DBC series on the entire internet. Congrats to OP; your hard work and attention to detail shows!!
...
Once again, thank you for posting this comprehensive list and explanation of all the different models.

PS - another factoid I learned is the multi-colored "Cosmos" ones have a very faint but noticable backdrop behind the LCD having micro-organisms and similar things, thats kinda cool. Attached to this post is an infosheet I found, alebit its a bit fuzzy and hard to read. It does show the backdrop (the red fuzzy things) somewhat.
Thank you - I'm a big fan of the series, and Casio in general. When I went to find out everything I could it was clear there wasn't a great source of truth, and I turned up info on the line that I don't think anyone mentioned elsewhere. The few places that had information were on old pages in other languages, or dead threads with dead links and lost photos. So it seemed right to share back.

I love all the weird variations of the DBC-63, including the ones with imprinted images on the backlight. I'm sure plenty of them have no pictures of those images anywhere on the internet. So it would be cool if this thread became that place for owners and collectors to share - so thanks for sharing that advert back as well!
 

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First post!

Recently acquired a handful of Casio Databank DBC / DBX watches, and wanted to write down what I've found out for others to follow. I believe DBC means "Data Bank Calculator", as they all have an alphanumeric keypad for entering in numbers and text. Since the DBC watches have the keypad, it makes sense to add a calculator for "free". These differ from the Casio DB watches, which require you enter in each character individually by cycling through with two large front buttons.

Here's my DBC-60, which I believe is the first DBC watch released:
View attachment 15390507 View attachment 15390508 View attachment 15390509

I believe this is the original strap that came with this watch. The official replacement straps didn't have the "Casio" and "Data Bank" writing. Casio replacement bands commonly lacked printing on them. Casio also released the DBC-600 and DBC-600G, the silver and gold plated models with the stainless linked bracelets:
View attachment 15390948 View attachment 15390949
These three watches use the 563 module, and I think they are the only Casios to do so. They came out in 1985 as far as I can tell. The keypad wears easily, and most are destroyed by fingernails over the years. Take a look at used models and see, most are in bad shape. The one here is in good condition believe it or not. Mine is usable, but feels soft and mushy. I don't know if it came that way or it's happened by age, but I try not use use it. The 563 module let you store up to 50 telememo records and scheduled dates, sharing the same memory. Telememos could have up to 9 characters of text input with the keypad, and 12 digits of numbers. The DBC watches have a 'secret' function - you can password protect some values using the "secret data area". Password protect values using a 4 digital password, resetting the password erases the secret values. The schedule function lets you store dates and times and give a 12 character label. The displays shows any day where you have an appointment in the next two weeks. The appointments automatically delete once the day has passed A hidden function - hold adjust/mode/secret buttons at the same time to see all LCD elements.The "INV" button activates a small microlight, and is unlabeled as such.

Why was '60' was used for this first model, even though it stored 50 records? Casio tried not to have similar lines of watches share the same number, even if prefixes differed. Casio databanks included the DB-20, DB-30, CD-40, and DB-50. DBC-60 appears to be the next available in the sequence, adding the C for some additional description.

1988 saw the release of the DBX-100 and DBX-100G series with the 261 module:

The DBX-100 was silver with a stainless bracelet, the DBX-100G was gold plated. The DBX-100 was overall a similar style to the DBC-60, but is a different case with all 4 side buttons next to the keypad, with a larger fully dot-matrix display. One could store up to 100 telememo records of 8 characters and 12 digits, or 65 scheduled dates with 16 character messages, or 61 regular memos of 24 characters. Memos were searchable, and the dot matrix display could display a weeks view of schedule with start and end times graphed out. It is perhaps the most advanced display on any DBC/DBX watch. No other watch used this display or 261 module. Sadly, most of these watches have their keypads absolutely obliterated. It's rare to find one in good condition, and if found I would not want to use it for fear of wearing it. DBX seems to mean "Data Base eXtended", or expanded, or extra. The typical Data Bank stored 50 records, the DBX watches stored 100 records. Perhaps that is why all the DBX models start with 100 (I can only see that the DBX-100, DBX-101, DBX-110, DBX-102, DBX-112, and DBX-103 exist). The DBX-101 and DBX-110 share the same module and are more closely tied with the classic Casio DB line, and are not discussed here. The DBX-102, DBX-112, and DBX-103 are discussed later on.

1989 saw the DBC-61, DBC-610, and DBC-610G models, using an improved 676 module:
View attachment 15390878 View attachment 15390890 View attachment 15390891
The DBC-61 is the black resin model, the DBC-610 is the silver plated with stainless bracelet, and the DBC-610G is the gold plated with gold stainless IP bracelet. Interestingly, some of these seem to have water resist while others don't. The water resistant models say "WR" below the screen instead of the '&':
View attachment 15390879 View attachment 15390894
The model number seems to be the same, though I think these are the DBC-61-1A models released in 1992. I'm not sure what the WR DBC-610 is, and I can't find photos of a WR DBC-610G. These water resist models would be the only water resist DBC Casios ever made, even over 30 years later. I don't have one to show you here, I'm using pictures I've found elsewhere. They use a slightly different case than the DBC-60/DBC-600, it's different at the top if you look closely. The top part on the DBC-60 integrates well with the resin band, but doesn't match the bracelet. On the DBC-61, the top part is flat and fits the DBC-610 and DBC-610G models better, but doesn't fit the DBC-61 resin band as well.

The 676 module improves upon the 563 by adding a countdown timer and a world time function. The display is also improved. The key was moved to where the fixed "sig" and "al." used to be. "AM" and "PM" were replaced with smaller "A" and "P", and was moved lower down. This let the dot matrix portion of the display extend further left, and has no gaps between characters. There's also a colon added to the date section, to allow for viewing the local time in world time mode. The fixed portion of the display also has gridlines between days. The enhanced display lets you see more characters in data bank mode, but also persistently displays the year when you're in timekeeping mode.

1991 saw the release of the DBC-62, continuing with the 676 module:
View attachment 15390886
The module may have remained the same, but the case and keypad were vastly improved from a flat membrane to a rubber segmented one. There also appears to be a DBC-62-9G (released later in 1994), with a gold tinted display and gold lettering.
View attachment 15391048
The DBC-62 doesn't appear to have a DBC-620 and DBC-620G counterpart, perhaps because the DBX-102 and DBX-112 filled that role. These shared the same case design as the DBC-62, but used an upgraded 642 module. The 642 module has a storage capacity of 100 records instead of the 50 records in the 676. They seem to use the same display and have the same functionality, but lack a microlight. The DBX-102 had been released in 1990, the DBX-112 in 1991. At some point they ditched the DBX line, perhaps it would be confusing to use a different letter for models with different quantities of records. The later DBC-30, DBC-80, DBC-150, DBC-300 lines would have all needed a different prefix.

My DBX-102:
View attachment 15390542 View attachment 15390543 View attachment 15390544

Note the updated display of the 642 module (Which I believe it shares with the 676), I used the same hidden function to fill all segments. While this DBX-102 seems to share the same case as the DBC-62, the crystal and the keypad have different arrangements and coloring. The rubber keypad is much better to use than the earlier models, and also appears to be more durable. Used models mostly seem to be intact. I believe this band is also original, where the lower portion says DATA BANK, but the upper part no longer says "Casio" like it does on my DBC-60. Interestingly, the rear stainless panel is painted over in black on the DBX-102. I've not seen many Casios that paint the rear panel, and cannot think of what benefit that gives. We see from my picture how that turns out.

My DBX-112:
View attachment 15390557 View attachment 15390558 View attachment 15390559

The DBX-112 has a similar crystal and the same keypad as the DBX-102, with the same shape case as both the DBC-62 and DBX-102, but this time in grey resin. It's the only databank I can see that doesn't paint/plate the premium model that comes with bracelet. It almost seems like they forgot, but grey/beige was popular at the time I guess. You can see that the rear stainless plate is painted grey too. Again, not sure why. The bracelet has small polished sections between the links, differing from the DBC-600 and DBC-610 models. There doesn't seem to be a gold DBX-112G model either. I could polish this crystal up a bit, but the lighting is making all these watches look worse than they really do.

1994 saw the release of the DBX-103, which I do not have. It's peculiar in that it seems to use the same 642 module as the DBX-102 and DBX-112, but a new case and keypad design:
View attachment 15390904
It doesn't seem to share that case or keypad with any other Casio. There is no DBX-113 or DBX-113G. The DBX-103 forgoes a keypad and instead uses an array of buttons. It appears to be more durable than that used on the DBC-62 / DBX-102 / DBX-112. The DBX-103 is not a 100 record version of the DBC-63, as the naming could imply. The DBC-63 is a different watch entirely.

Enter the DBM-150 and DBM-151:
View attachment 15391084 View attachment 15391085
Released in 1994 and 1995, respectively, both used the 1079 module. It's very hard to find any real information on these watches, but they appear to be the only ones using this module or style of case. I believe they're also the first to use the "Telememo 150" branding. The light button is on the side, and the secret/c button moves to the face of the watch. It does appear to use the same keypad style as the DBX-103. The biggest advance with the DBM models appears to be the "Memory Protection" feature. Up until now, the DBC and DBX models required continual power to preserve the memory data. A battery replacement done incorrectly would wipe all data. DBC and DBX models up until this point appear to have two batteries, and it is necessary to replace one at a time so as to not clear out memory. The DBM models use an EEPROM to store data, and use a single battery. I believe DBM stands for "Data Bank with Memory Protect". It's also the first Data Bank with 150 records capacity, perhaps this was Casio continuing to change the prefix letters as capacity changed. It's also unclear why the DBM-151 is not named the DBM-1500. Regardless, these models seem quickly replaced.

My DBC-63B, featuring Electro Luminescence:
View attachment 15390624 View attachment 15390625 View attachment 15390626
Released in 1995, the DBC-63 used the 1276 module and continued with having 50 records of storage. It's now branded as the "Telememo 50" model, corresponding to the 50 records of storage. The main improvement with the DBC-63 is the addition of the illuminator function, Casio's elecro-luminescent backlight. The light button on the front activates the EL backlight, the piece of plastic to the left just says "illuminator" and is not a button even though it looks like one. The one I have works great, but is a bit beat up on the front, it's also missing the correct band. The LCD had to move the chime and alarm segments to make room for the EL display, indicating that alarms would flash the light. The DBC-63 uses black buttons, the DBC-63B uses buttons that glow in the dark, what you see here. There's also the DBC-630A and DBC-630BA (Usually just listed as DBC-630), that use the same case shape and 1276 module, just are chrome plated and use a bracelet:
View attachment 15391334 View attachment 15391338
The DBC-630BA model has the glowing keypad just like the DBC-63. The DBC-63 seems to have been a huge success, as over 2 dozen models seem to have been released between 1995 and 1998. There were special editions and lots of translucent models in varying colors.

1995 also saw the release of the DBC-30, DBC-30G, DBC-300, and DBC-300G lineup of watches with the 1253 module, the "Telememo 30" line. These were the only 4 Telememo 30 models released. These had a similar style to the DBC-63/630, but very different functionality. The DBC-30 and DBC-30G were black resin:
View attachment 15391382
My DBC-300:
View attachment 15390730 View attachment 15390731 View attachment 15391360
The DBC-300G is the only gold plated later-year model that I've seen:
View attachment 15391349
The 1253 module in addition to only having storage for 30 records, lost the scheduling ability other DBC models had up to this point - it could not store times and dates. It also loses the world time function, but gains 5 alarms. You are able to store Telememo numbers as either fax #s or telephone numbers for organization. The fact that these were the only 4 models made suggests it was not a big seller.

1996 saw an explosion of the DBC line of watches. The Telememo 80 line included the DBC-80 / DBC-800, and the DBC-81 / DBC-810 using modules 1486 and 1476 respectively. The Telememo 150 line included the DBC-150 / DBC-1500 using the 1477 module, and the Telememo 300 line included the DBC-310 / DBC-3000 the 1478 module. The number of records the watch stored is reflected in the model number for all but the DBC-6x lineup, for historical reasons as outlaid above.

I believe the mid '90s was the peak of Databank popularity, as they had come down in price, improved in functionality, and cell phones that stored names and numbers were not yet commonplace. These were life savers in the age of using whatever landline or payphone was nearby. The Telememo 80, 150, and 300 models had a similar style and all list "Memory Protect", which means they use an EEPROM for secure data storage. I do not have any of the Telememo 80 nor Telememo 300 models, take a look at my follow-up reply with all the models I could find online!

I do have a Telememo 150, a DBC-1500B:
View attachment 15390784 View attachment 15390785 View attachment 15390786
The display appears the same as any Telememo 50, 80, 150, and 300 model. There were many Telememo 150 models released in different styles and colors, including the DBC-1500B seen here. Look at my follow-up reply to see more!

Some other notable DBC models include the "Easy Rec" DBC-V50 and DBC-V500, 1999's voice memo Data Bank models using the 1591 module.
View attachment 15390923 View attachment 15390924
The DBC-W150 and DBC-W1500 were released in 2001, and added Waveceptor (Casio's radio-sync atomic time technology), using the 2296 module. The DBC-W151 with module 2298 also exists for the Japanese market. This was before Multiband 5 technology, so different modules were used in different regions around the world. There may be other models for other regions.
View attachment 15390925 View attachment 15390926

2004 - 2008 saw the release of the DBC-32 lineup, contemporary models using the 2888 module. See my follow-up reply for more information!

One last model to talk about. An exciting "retro" release happened in 2011, when Casio released the DBC-611 and DBC-611G:
View attachment 15390962 View attachment 15390960

Here's my DBC-611G, which I believe is the last DBC watch released:
View attachment 15390808 View attachment 15390809 View attachment 15390810

The DBC-611 (silver) and DBC-611G (gold) models were released in 2011 with the 3228 module, and is still available for purchase new. This most recent Data Bank Calculator watch brings the DBC line full circle over 25 years later, borrowing the case design of the DBC-60 (actually the DBC-61 looking at the top of the case). While the model number only increments the DBC-610 by 1, it is in fact a very different watch. The display is entirely different from any other DBC watch, and the module is most similar to 2004's DBC-32. The 3228 module has all the features and functionality of the 2888, but with a different display designed to look more similar to the DBC-60/DBC-600/DBC-61/DBC-610 watches this is based on. Like the 2888, it only stores 25 records. It lacks the secret and schedule functionality, but adds the auto illuminator led-based light to this case style for the first time. The keypad may look cleaner, but it can no longer be used to enter in text. The Rev/Time and Tel/Fwd buttons are used to cycle through, much like the traditional DB series of watches. The keypad feels much stronger and easier to use than my DBC-60, it feels like it will not wear out nearly as easily. The "Multi Lingual" feature this advertises is not a translator, but merely an option to control the language used to display the day of the week on the dot matrix display, and the set of characters to use in data bank mode. While the data bank functionality on this watch is less featured than any other DBC watch, the need for a data bank watch in 2011 and beyond is seriously reduced with current phones. The DBC-611 exists as a retro piece with a cleaner keypad and more convenient illumination. More people will see it as a calculator watch rather than a way to store names and numbers. It also has 5 alarms instead of the typical 1, but it loses the count down timer. There is no black resin version of this watch either (What would they call it? The DBC-61.1?)

That's it for now, I'll update the above with new info if I acquire any more. I'd really like to get my own DBC-61, DBC-62, and DBX-103 to complete the vintage lineup, and of course would love a DBX-100 in good shape. Other than that, a gold DBC-300G or DBC-800G, a DBC-3000B and perhaps the Easy Rec models.

What do you think about the Casio DBC lineup? Do you think they will release more DBC models or is this the end of databank as we know it?

Credit to unnamed google image searches and digital-watch.com for the watches I don't have available to take photos of
Hi there,
First post!

Recently acquired a handful of Casio Databank DBC / DBX watches, and wanted to write down what I've found out for others to follow. I believe DBC means "Data Bank Calculator", as they all have an alphanumeric keypad for entering in numbers and text. Since the DBC watches have the keypad, it makes sense to add a calculator for "free". These differ from the Casio DB watches, which require you enter in each character individually by cycling through with two large front buttons.

Here's my DBC-60, which I believe is the first DBC watch released:
View attachment 15390507 View attachment 15390508 View attachment 15390509

I believe this is the original strap that came with this watch. The official replacement straps didn't have the "Casio" and "Data Bank" writing. Casio replacement bands commonly lacked printing on them. Casio also released the DBC-600 and DBC-600G, the silver and gold plated models with the stainless linked bracelets:
View attachment 15390948 View attachment 15390949
These three watches use the 563 module, and I think they are the only Casios to do so. They came out in 1985 as far as I can tell. The keypad wears easily, and most are destroyed by fingernails over the years. Take a look at used models and see, most are in bad shape. The one here is in good condition believe it or not. Mine is usable, but feels soft and mushy. I don't know if it came that way or it's happened by age, but I try not use use it. The 563 module let you store up to 50 telememo records and scheduled dates, sharing the same memory. Telememos could have up to 9 characters of text input with the keypad, and 12 digits of numbers. The DBC watches have a 'secret' function - you can password protect some values using the "secret data area". Password protect values using a 4 digital password, resetting the password erases the secret values. The schedule function lets you store dates and times and give a 12 character label. The displays shows any day where you have an appointment in the next two weeks. The appointments automatically delete once the day has passed A hidden function - hold adjust/mode/secret buttons at the same time to see all LCD elements.The "INV" button activates a small microlight, and is unlabeled as such.

Why was '60' was used for this first model, even though it stored 50 records? Casio tried not to have similar lines of watches share the same number, even if prefixes differed. Casio databanks included the DB-20, DB-30, CD-40, and DB-50. DBC-60 appears to be the next available in the sequence, adding the C for some additional description.

1988 saw the release of the DBX-100 and DBX-100G series with the 261 module:

The DBX-100 was silver with a stainless bracelet, the DBX-100G was gold plated. The DBX-100 was overall a similar style to the DBC-60, but is a different case with all 4 side buttons next to the keypad, with a larger fully dot-matrix display. One could store up to 100 telememo records of 8 characters and 12 digits, or 65 scheduled dates with 16 character messages, or 61 regular memos of 24 characters. Memos were searchable, and the dot matrix display could display a weeks view of schedule with start and end times graphed out. It is perhaps the most advanced display on any DBC/DBX watch. No other watch used this display or 261 module. Sadly, most of these watches have their keypads absolutely obliterated. It's rare to find one in good condition, and if found I would not want to use it for fear of wearing it. DBX seems to mean "Data Base eXtended", or expanded, or extra. The typical Data Bank stored 50 records, the DBX watches stored 100 records. Perhaps that is why all the DBX models start with 100 (I can only see that the DBX-100, DBX-101, DBX-110, DBX-102, DBX-112, and DBX-103 exist). The DBX-101 and DBX-110 share the same module and are more closely tied with the classic Casio DB line, and are not discussed here. The DBX-102, DBX-112, and DBX-103 are discussed later on.

1989 saw the DBC-61, DBC-610, and DBC-610G models, using an improved 676 module:
View attachment 15390878 View attachment 15390890 View attachment 15390891
The DBC-61 is the black resin model, the DBC-610 is the silver plated with stainless bracelet, and the DBC-610G is the gold plated with gold stainless IP bracelet. Interestingly, some of these seem to have water resist while others don't. The water resistant models say "WR" below the screen instead of the '&':
View attachment 15390879 View attachment 15390894
The model number seems to be the same, though I think these are the DBC-61-1A models released in 1992. I'm not sure what the WR DBC-610 is, and I can't find photos of a WR DBC-610G. These water resist models would be the only water resist DBC Casios ever made, even over 30 years later. I don't have one to show you here, I'm using pictures I've found elsewhere. They use a slightly different case than the DBC-60/DBC-600, it's different at the top if you look closely. The top part on the DBC-60 integrates well with the resin band, but doesn't match the bracelet. On the DBC-61, the top part is flat and fits the DBC-610 and DBC-610G models better, but doesn't fit the DBC-61 resin band as well.

The 676 module improves upon the 563 by adding a countdown timer and a world time function. The display is also improved. The key was moved to where the fixed "sig" and "al." used to be. "AM" and "PM" were replaced with smaller "A" and "P", and was moved lower down. This let the dot matrix portion of the display extend further left, and has no gaps between characters. There's also a colon added to the date section, to allow for viewing the local time in world time mode. The fixed portion of the display also has gridlines between days. The enhanced display lets you see more characters in data bank mode, but also persistently displays the year when you're in timekeeping mode.

1991 saw the release of the DBC-62, continuing with the 676 module:
View attachment 15390886
The module may have remained the same, but the case and keypad were vastly improved from a flat membrane to a rubber segmented one. There also appears to be a DBC-62-9G (released later in 1994), with a gold tinted display and gold lettering.
View attachment 15391048
The DBC-62 doesn't appear to have a DBC-620 and DBC-620G counterpart, perhaps because the DBX-102 and DBX-112 filled that role. These shared the same case design as the DBC-62, but used an upgraded 642 module. The 642 module has a storage capacity of 100 records instead of the 50 records in the 676. They seem to use the same display and have the same functionality, but lack a microlight. The DBX-102 had been released in 1990, the DBX-112 in 1991. At some point they ditched the DBX line, perhaps it would be confusing to use a different letter for models with different quantities of records. The later DBC-30, DBC-80, DBC-150, DBC-300 lines would have all needed a different prefix.

My DBX-102:
View attachment 15390542 View attachment 15390543 View attachment 15390544

Note the updated display of the 642 module (Which I believe it shares with the 676), I used the same hidden function to fill all segments. While this DBX-102 seems to share the same case as the DBC-62, the crystal and the keypad have different arrangements and coloring. The rubber keypad is much better to use than the earlier models, and also appears to be more durable. Used models mostly seem to be intact. I believe this band is also original, where the lower portion says DATA BANK, but the upper part no longer says "Casio" like it does on my DBC-60. Interestingly, the rear stainless panel is painted over in black on the DBX-102. I've not seen many Casios that paint the rear panel, and cannot think of what benefit that gives. We see from my picture how that turns out.

My DBX-112:
View attachment 15390557 View attachment 15390558 View attachment 15390559

The DBX-112 has a similar crystal and the same keypad as the DBX-102, with the same shape case as both the DBC-62 and DBX-102, but this time in grey resin. It's the only databank I can see that doesn't paint/plate the premium model that comes with bracelet. It almost seems like they forgot, but grey/beige was popular at the time I guess. You can see that the rear stainless plate is painted grey too. Again, not sure why. The bracelet has small polished sections between the links, differing from the DBC-600 and DBC-610 models. There doesn't seem to be a gold DBX-112G model either. I could polish this crystal up a bit, but the lighting is making all these watches look worse than they really do.

1994 saw the release of the DBX-103, which I do not have. It's peculiar in that it seems to use the same 642 module as the DBX-102 and DBX-112, but a new case and keypad design:
View attachment 15390904
It doesn't seem to share that case or keypad with any other Casio. There is no DBX-113 or DBX-113G. The DBX-103 forgoes a keypad and instead uses an array of buttons. It appears to be more durable than that used on the DBC-62 / DBX-102 / DBX-112. The DBX-103 is not a 100 record version of the DBC-63, as the naming could imply. The DBC-63 is a different watch entirely.

Enter the DBM-150 and DBM-151:
View attachment 15391084 View attachment 15391085
Released in 1994 and 1995, respectively, both used the 1079 module. It's very hard to find any real information on these watches, but they appear to be the only ones using this module or style of case. I believe they're also the first to use the "Telememo 150" branding. The light button is on the side, and the secret/c button moves to the face of the watch. It does appear to use the same keypad style as the DBX-103. The biggest advance with the DBM models appears to be the "Memory Protection" feature. Up until now, the DBC and DBX models required continual power to preserve the memory data. A battery replacement done incorrectly would wipe all data. DBC and DBX models up until this point appear to have two batteries, and it is necessary to replace one at a time so as to not clear out memory. The DBM models use an EEPROM to store data, and use a single battery. I believe DBM stands for "Data Bank with Memory Protect". It's also the first Data Bank with 150 records capacity, perhaps this was Casio continuing to change the prefix letters as capacity changed. It's also unclear why the DBM-151 is not named the DBM-1500. Regardless, these models seem quickly replaced.

My DBC-63B, featuring Electro Luminescence:
View attachment 15390624 View attachment 15390625 View attachment 15390626
Released in 1995, the DBC-63 used the 1276 module and continued with having 50 records of storage. It's now branded as the "Telememo 50" model, corresponding to the 50 records of storage. The main improvement with the DBC-63 is the addition of the illuminator function, Casio's elecro-luminescent backlight. The light button on the front activates the EL backlight, the piece of plastic to the left just says "illuminator" and is not a button even though it looks like one. The one I have works great, but is a bit beat up on the front, it's also missing the correct band. The LCD had to move the chime and alarm segments to make room for the EL display, indicating that alarms would flash the light. The DBC-63 uses black buttons, the DBC-63B uses buttons that glow in the dark, what you see here. There's also the DBC-630A and DBC-630BA (Usually just listed as DBC-630), that use the same case shape and 1276 module, just are chrome plated and use a bracelet:
View attachment 15391334 View attachment 15391338
The DBC-630BA model has the glowing keypad just like the DBC-63. The DBC-63 seems to have been a huge success, as over 2 dozen models seem to have been released between 1995 and 1998. There were special editions and lots of translucent models in varying colors.

1995 also saw the release of the DBC-30, DBC-30G, DBC-300, and DBC-300G lineup of watches with the 1253 module, the "Telememo 30" line. These were the only 4 Telememo 30 models released. These had a similar style to the DBC-63/630, but very different functionality. The DBC-30 and DBC-30G were black resin:
View attachment 15391382
My DBC-300:
View attachment 15390730 View attachment 15390731 View attachment 15391360
The DBC-300G is the only gold plated later-year model that I've seen:
View attachment 15391349
The 1253 module in addition to only having storage for 30 records, lost the scheduling ability other DBC models had up to this point - it could not store times and dates. It also loses the world time function, but gains 5 alarms. You are able to store Telememo numbers as either fax #s or telephone numbers for organization. The fact that these were the only 4 models made suggests it was not a big seller.

1996 saw an explosion of the DBC line of watches. The Telememo 80 line included the DBC-80 / DBC-800, and the DBC-81 / DBC-810 using modules 1486 and 1476 respectively. The Telememo 150 line included the DBC-150 / DBC-1500 using the 1477 module, and the Telememo 300 line included the DBC-310 / DBC-3000 the 1478 module. The number of records the watch stored is reflected in the model number for all but the DBC-6x lineup, for historical reasons as outlaid above.

I believe the mid '90s was the peak of Databank popularity, as they had come down in price, improved in functionality, and cell phones that stored names and numbers were not yet commonplace. These were life savers in the age of using whatever landline or payphone was nearby. The Telememo 80, 150, and 300 models had a similar style and all list "Memory Protect", which means they use an EEPROM for secure data storage. I do not have any of the Telememo 80 nor Telememo 300 models, take a look at my follow-up reply with all the models I could find online!

I do have a Telememo 150, a DBC-1500B:
View attachment 15390784 View attachment 15390785 View attachment 15390786
The display appears the same as any Telememo 50, 80, 150, and 300 model. There were many Telememo 150 models released in different styles and colors, including the DBC-1500B seen here. Look at my follow-up reply to see more!

Some other notable DBC models include the "Easy Rec" DBC-V50 and DBC-V500, 1999's voice memo Data Bank models using the 1591 module.
View attachment 15390923 View attachment 15390924
The DBC-W150 and DBC-W1500 were released in 2001, and added Waveceptor (Casio's radio-sync atomic time technology), using the 2296 module. The DBC-W151 with module 2298 also exists for the Japanese market. This was before Multiband 5 technology, so different modules were used in different regions around the world. There may be other models for other regions.
View attachment 15390925 View attachment 15390926

2004 - 2008 saw the release of the DBC-32 lineup, contemporary models using the 2888 module. See my follow-up reply for more information!

One last model to talk about. An exciting "retro" release happened in 2011, when Casio released the DBC-611 and DBC-611G:
View attachment 15390962 View attachment 15390960

Here's my DBC-611G, which I believe is the last DBC watch released:
View attachment 15390808 View attachment 15390809 View attachment 15390810

The DBC-611 (silver) and DBC-611G (gold) models were released in 2011 with the 3228 module, and is still available for purchase new. This most recent Data Bank Calculator watch brings the DBC line full circle over 25 years later, borrowing the case design of the DBC-60 (actually the DBC-61 looking at the top of the case). While the model number only increments the DBC-610 by 1, it is in fact a very different watch. The display is entirely different from any other DBC watch, and the module is most similar to 2004's DBC-32. The 3228 module has all the features and functionality of the 2888, but with a different display designed to look more similar to the DBC-60/DBC-600/DBC-61/DBC-610 watches this is based on. Like the 2888, it only stores 25 records. It lacks the secret and schedule functionality, but adds the auto illuminator led-based light to this case style for the first time. The keypad may look cleaner, but it can no longer be used to enter in text. The Rev/Time and Tel/Fwd buttons are used to cycle through, much like the traditional DB series of watches. The keypad feels much stronger and easier to use than my DBC-60, it feels like it will not wear out nearly as easily. The "Multi Lingual" feature this advertises is not a translator, but merely an option to control the language used to display the day of the week on the dot matrix display, and the set of characters to use in data bank mode. While the data bank functionality on this watch is less featured than any other DBC watch, the need for a data bank watch in 2011 and beyond is seriously reduced with current phones. The DBC-611 exists as a retro piece with a cleaner keypad and more convenient illumination. More people will see it as a calculator watch rather than a way to store names and numbers. It also has 5 alarms instead of the typical 1, but it loses the count down timer. There is no black resin version of this watch either (What would they call it? The DBC-61.1?)

That's it for now, I'll update the above with new info if I acquire any more. I'd really like to get my own DBC-61, DBC-62, and DBX-103 to complete the vintage lineup, and of course would love a DBX-100 in good shape. Other than that, a gold DBC-300G or DBC-800G, a DBC-3000B and perhaps the Easy Rec models.

What do you think about the Casio DBC lineup? Do you think they will release more DBC models or is this the end of databank as we know it?

Credit to unnamed google image searches and digital-watch.com for the watches I don't have available to take photos of
Hi there, just found your post. I have a dbc-610 which has a broken case. I found a dbc-610 on eBay which doesn't work. Can I swap my internals into the dbc-610?
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi there,

Hi there, just found your post. I have a dbc-610 which has a broken case. I found a dbc-610 on eBay which doesn't work. Can I swap my internals into the dbc-610?
Mark
Only seeing this now. Yes, it's the best way to get old Casios working again - taking a working one with physical damage and mixing it with a broken one in good physical condition. The DBC watches have a larger back panel and module than most others, but take your time with it and you should be fine. Try not to have any metal tabs on the module catch on anything when you're re-installing. I've found that a good spring bar tool is good at helping me remove and install modules.
 
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