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Hello everyone. I've enjoyed reading all this great information and seeing wonderful pictures about all these watches on this forum. Its helped tremendously in my understanding about watches. However, I'm having problems figuring out how you know what type of movement a watch uses.

Some manufacturers do not list their movement type (ex ETA 2824 or 2892). For the most part, I find its an 'automatic' not a 'quartz' but not if the automatic movement is a 2824 or 2892 or whatever. Where does one find this information? I'm starting to get the handle on what watch companies use the ETA or their own movements so I get that difference. I understand that some companies use 'copies' of the ETA movements too. I just want to know if xxx watch uses xxx movement beyond the basic 'automatic' or 'quartz' movement. Maybe its a level of Freak-Jedi-Watch-Mastery I haven't attained yet.

Specifically, I was looking at Tissot's various chronograph watches (many look the same) but no info on the movement types. The ADs in my area had no idea what I was talking about (I went to three ADs) nor did they carry any so I pretty much have to buy these sight unseen and like to gather as much info as I can first. . . maybe through a gray market dealer (amazon) but that seems to be another hot topic here.

Thanks in advance everyone!
 

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90% of all the automatic Swiss chronographs will be an ETA 7750.
 

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Hello everyone. I've enjoyed reading all this great information and seeing wonderful pictures about all these watches on this forum. Its helped tremendously in my understanding about watches. However, I'm having problems figuring out how you know what type of movement a watch uses.

Some manufacturers do not list their movement type (ex ETA 2824 or 2892). For the most part, I find its an 'automatic' not a 'quartz' but not if the automatic movement is a 2824 or 2892 or whatever. Where does one find this information? I'm starting to get the handle on what watch companies use the ETA or their own movements so I get that difference. I understand that some companies use 'copies' of the ETA movements too. I just want to know if xxx watch uses xxx movement beyond the basic 'automatic' or 'quartz' movement. Maybe its a level of Freak-Jedi-Watch-Mastery I haven't attained yet.

Specifically, I was looking at Tissot's various chronograph watches (many look the same) but no info on the movement types. The ADs in my area had no idea what I was talking about (I went to three ADs) nor did they carry any so I pretty much have to buy these sight unseen and like to gather as much info as I can first. . . maybe through a gray market dealer (amazon) but that seems to be another hot topic here.

Thanks in advance everyone!
Tissot uses ETA and Valjoux 7750 movements. The higher end Tissot watches will use the Valjoux 7750 and the lower to mid-range use the ETA movement. Both of these movements are produced by ETA which in turn is owned by Swatch. Tissot and many other brands all fall under the Swatch banner. Wikipedia is a good place to start out than you can look up the sources quoted on Wikipedia.
 

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I am a particular fan of Tissot and I find that, when browsing their site, the movements for non-quartz watches are shown. Look carefully at the technical details and you'll see it.
 

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Stick around WUS long enough and you'll pick it up for sure. I wouldn't count on the salespeople at the AD too much for in-depth technical details (unless they happen to be a WIS as well ;-)).

I don't know too much about the Tissot movements, but I'm sure a quick search on the forums should give you lots of info.

Welcome to WUS, by the way. :)
 

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After a while you'll get enough experience to know what some movements look like. You'll be able to spot an ETA by the shape of the bridges, plates, and rotor hub. It just takes time. Most companies DON'T want you to know they use generic movements (not saying they're bad!) so they refinish and rename them as their own calibers. Other companies do this but are up front about which ETA they used as a base - Oris is a good example.

Oh, and Freak-Jedi-Watch-Mastery is called WISdom. Let me answer your next question: WIS means Watch Idiot Savant.
 

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Tissot uses two types of chronograph movements for their automatics - most auto chronos have the ETA Valjoux 7750, a couple of the new chronos in the PRC200 and Couturier lines use the new ETA C01.211 movement (also used in the new Swatch auto chronos), the watches having this movement (an offspring of the Lemania 5100, it seems like) are cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After a while you'll get enough experience to know what some movements look like. You'll be able to spot an ETA by the shape of the bridges, plates, and rotor hub. It just takes time. Most companies DON'T want you to know they use generic movements (not saying they're bad!) so they refinish and rename them as their own calibers. Other companies do this but are up front about which ETA they used as a base - Oris is a good example.

Oh, and Freak-Jedi-Watch-Mastery is called WISdom. Let me answer your next question: WIS means Watch Idiot Savant.

thanks - so i take it that for the most part its by experience and by looking at the watch itself? and i always did wonder what WIS stood for - another mystery solved!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks guys, i went back through and looked at the Tissot site and did find more info on the type of movements. I didn't know what I was looking for and missed it. I appreciate the knowledge!

I did see that most chronos use the 7750 movement - that makes things easier.

I guess the next level is figuring out the movement type without the assistance of a website.

thanks again!
 

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I ask Mr. Google, he knows everthing :-d
 
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