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I've never slept with my Rolex on overnight, as I don't really see the point. But during a recent discussion about Rolex accuracy someone was talking about keeping their watch face up to gain the most time. I was curious, what position do you leave your Rolex in and why? What have people found, in terms of gaining or losing time?

I have personally taken to leaving the watch crown up at night. While I've read articles suggesting crown down is the answer I find it is easier to balance the watch on the non crown side. I don't choose to leave the watch face up, as this lets the back rest on the clasp and I think increases the chances of scratching.

Overall, I've been getting a gain of less than 0.25 seconds a day, which I find pretty great.

So how do you leave your primary Rolex that you wear most days overnight? And why?
 

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This is how I basically put all of my watches to sleep every night, with the crown facing downwards. Never had any issues with my Rolex watches which seem to gain only about +2 seconds a day. The only watch that I own which happens to be affected by being in that position is my unregulated out of the box Seiko MM300. I place it with the crown facing upwards so it wouldn't gain too much time (about +4 seconds a day compared with 8 to 10 seconds with the crown facing downwards).



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Dial Up on a watch box.

I'm loosing .2 secs per day with this position.


Best regards,
 

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Dial up on the bed, next to my pillow. I've got an '86 16800 and it's running ridiculously slow. Like -17 seconds per day slow. So until I can take it to my local guy who does all my watch work, (read: when he comes back from his vacation) that's how it shall be.


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I don't yet have a Rolex, but I kept my Tudor Pelagos crown up at night. No particular reason other than I thought it would be likely to scratch the bracelet putting it face up and I didn't notice enough drift to worry about the position (maybe 2-3 seconds/day). At that rate it usually ran down from a day or two of not wearing it before the time drifted enough to have to correct.
 

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I wear mine. I like being able to check the time when I'm not facing my clock. If I'm not wearing it, I just leave it face up. I'm not really concerned with which position is best when it's not on my wrist.


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Dial up on night stand or it stays on my wrist depending on where I fall asleep. I have no idea how many seconds it gains or loses. Shrug.


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I don't have a Rolex yet, but I keep my Black Bay dial up at night and it gains average of just over 1 second per day. I think each individual watch may be different, but I wouldn't expect huge positional variation with Rolexes certified to -2/+2.
 

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I wear mine. I like being able to check the time when I'm not facing my clock. If I'm not wearing it, I just leave it face up. I'm not really concerned with which position is best when it's not on my wrist.


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I tend to move around a lot when I sleep. Do you ever worry that you're going to scratch your watch on your headboard or anything?
 

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I store my Rolex crown up at night.
It's on the winder when I wear my Tudor.

Same goes for the Tudor 😉
 

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I tend to move around a lot when I sleep. Do you ever worry that you're going to scratch your watch on your headboard or anything?
As another occasional watch sleeper, I've never had this concern. My headboard is wooden and is softer than the steel or ceramic on the watch. Further, it gets infinitely more scratches from daily use than being on my wrist at night. The biggest problem with sleeping in it is if I pin my arm just right it makes my hand a little more likely to go to sleep. Which means it'll be up all day...


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I tend to move around a lot when I sleep. Do you ever worry that you're going to scratch your watch on your headboard or anything?
My headboard is leather, so it's safe. But you're right, if it was metal or wood, I might think twice about it. I've been known to twitch violently in my sleep, and that might give me pause if there was any risk of damage. I've really come to enjoy sleeping while wearing my watch though. I initially thought it would be uncomfortable, but I don't even feel it.
 

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Funny I should encounter this thread, because I just watched a video last night on YouTube that suggested crown-down as the position least likely to introduce scratches to the case on a hard surface (crown up potentially introduces them to the side making contact with the surface; dial up may potentially introduce scratches to both the clasp and the case back, where it contacts the clasp). Putting it crown down exposes the least surface area, supposedly.

Regards,
Alysandir
 

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Just checkin in to say I have nothing useful to add about the proper way to store my watches at night.

I would like like to add that this forum has taught me so much in such a short time I'm indebted to you all. But now I'm a little paranoid that tossing my watch in the change/key tray is not the way to go.
 

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Crown side up, bracelet opened for support, been resting my Rolexes at night in this manner for 20+ years, never an issue with loss of time, long-term damage, etc.
 

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As another occasional watch sleeper, I've never had this concern. My headboard is wooden and is softer than the steel or ceramic on the watch. Further, it gets infinitely more scratches from daily use than being on my wrist at night. The biggest problem with sleeping in it is if I pin my arm just right it makes my hand a little more likely to go to sleep. Which means it'll be up all day...


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My bed is made of metal, but the headboard is cushioned. Even still, if wood couldn't scratch a watch, then whey do clasps get desk diver marks? To each his own, of course, but I can't sleep with my watch unless I'm fully clothed (i.e. a nap or when I'm home sick on the couch). But I've got all sorts of hangups about everything. Someone will probably write a textbook about my neuroses at some point.
 

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My bed is made of metal, but the headboard is cushioned. Even still, if wood couldn't scratch a watch, then whey do clasps get desk diver marks? To each his own, of course, but I can't sleep with my watch unless I'm fully clothed (i.e. a nap or when I'm home sick on the couch). But I've got all sorts of hangups about everything. Someone will probably write a textbook about my neuroses at some point.
The marks come often from the sand and dirt that accumulates on our desks and mouse pads and all of the little crevices that can hold those types of particulate on a horizontal surface. It's many many small particles. Also a lot of the scratches are not that at all but simply the remnants of whatever contacted your clasp or bracelet etc which has now rubbed off onto it. Locard's exchange principle and all of that. You'd be surprised what will come off of your clasp with a thorough or professional washing by a jeweler. I've seen a lot of "scratches" vanish after a good wash.

Best of luck whatever solution you seek!


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The marks come often from the sand and dirt that accumulates on our desks and mouse pads and all of the little crevices that can hold those types of particulate on a horizontal surface. It's many many small particles. Also a lot of the scratches are not that at all but simply the remnants of whatever contacted your clasp or bracelet etc which has now rubbed off onto it. Locard's exchange principle and all of that. You'd be surprised what will come off of your clasp with a thorough or professional washing by a jeweler. I've seen a lot of "scratches" vanish after a good wash.

Best of luck whatever solution you seek!


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Hmm. Good to know.
 
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