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Hi everyone, so this morning I got the idea of taking my seiko skx009 into the shower with me to help me keep track of time, since I always take extra long showers without even realizing it. It won't be on my wrist, it will be placed somewhere where I can just look at it. The water resistance of a seiko diver speaks for itself so I'm not worried about water damage. What I am worried about is potential rust. Especially since mine is on the standard jubilee steel bracelet. So how easily do diver watches rust? They're meant to be taken underwater so is there some protection on them at all? Water in my area is considered quite hard as well, if that has any effect on it. Thanks all.
 

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Soap & hot water can damage the seals on a divers watch. I would not recommend getting soap on the watch. As far as hot water is concerned I have taken diving watches into showers, steam rooms, & hot tubs and there was no rust on the bracelet, or damage to the seals, but I have stopped that practice. I have had diver watches for over 30 years and have never seen rust on them. I have worn out bracelets and straps through use but not rust.
 

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I've been getting showered in my Rolex for nearly 20 years now and there is not even a hint of rust and I doubt very much that the Seiko will show any marks either despite the different types of stainless steel used. Besides, you may take long showers but you and the watch get dried off afterwards.
 

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Most decent steel watches are made from stainless steel and do not rust.

Dirt in the bracelet (from sweat, etc) is damaging to your bracelet as the costant rubbing over time is what causes the bracelet to stretch. I wash mine with soap and hot water every few weeks as recommended by the manufacture. Gaskets are easily replaced at service time and designed to last long enough for this, so no concerns with soap.
 

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In 55 years I've never had a watch rust. For cleaning I suggest VERAET watch cleaner. It's great stuff.
 

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It would be highly unlikely for a stainless steel watch to rust under those conditions. Be more concerned about soap and scum buildup in crevices.

I would be concerned if it was a chrome plated case.
 

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Most steel watches are made of 316L stainless steel, I believe. So I'd say not easily.
 

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I would very surprised to see rust, but I would keep it well away from soap and shampoo and I would not expose the watch to high water pressure, particularly if your water reaches very hot temperatures.
 

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Absolutely.

The watch is only designed for water with the buffering effect provided by the delicate balance of mineral, biological and industrial-pollutant content in the natural diving environment. After all, it's stainless, not stainfree.

The water treatment process that strips away these protective components is also detrimental to the watch materials, and it should not be exposed to the harmful environment of an operating shower, even without direct contact (for just-looking-at-it purposes). Not to mention that the water vapour released will certainly penetrate the case and render the movement inoperable in short order. Your skin will be fine, however.

The safest thing to do is to store the watch in a sealed container filled with desiccant salts whenever you suspect the presence of running water, even if it's not in the same room. It goes without saying that you should avoid contact with soap at all costs, but as an extra precaution, it's best to avoid even thinking about washing while you're wearing the watch, to avoid the risk of psychokinetic surfactant particles forming in its vicinity.

Hope this helps!
 

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One thing to consider: an egg timer. I used to use one in the bathroom to keep myself from spending too much time in the shower when I was younger.
 

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One thing to consider: an egg timer. I used to use one in the bathroom to keep myself from spending too much time in the shower when I was younger.
Good suggestion. A wind up analog like this one is easier to set than one of the digial ones. Either way they are cheap at WalMart and Target.

Household thermometer Measuring instrument Kitchen utensil Meter Hygrometer
 

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It's bad enough that people don't wear their dive watches for diving ( yes me too ) now we are afraid to shower with them? Hot water and soap may in theory damage the seals, but if they can't take a shower then the watch is junk IMHO. I've had my watches in the shower for years and years, hotubs ( with jets), jumping off cliffs into water, baths, and never ever had a problem with my $150 Seikos to $1500 Doxas. Maybe I'm reckless with my watches but I WEAR my watches everywhere. I think some people are a little too paranoid about their watches.
 

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Most decent steel watches are made from stainless steel and do not rust.

Dirt in the bracelet (from sweat, etc) is damaging to your bracelet as the costant rubbing over time is what causes the bracelet to stretch.
I wash mine with soap and hot water every few weeks as recommended by the manufacture. Gaskets are easily replaced at service time and designed to last long enough for this, so no concerns with soap.
I often hear this and I'll agree with it for old bracelets, but I've seen plenty of jubilee bracelets, Seiko and Rolex, that in addition to any erosion they have experienced, have also legitimately had links elongated due to being pulled.
 

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The OP of that thread (don't have time to reread it this morning) doesn't entirely back you up on the soap and shampoo point.

I'm guessing any soap that eats rubber gaskets and steel watch cases probably isn't something I should be putting on my skin though.
Indeed. I was only pointing out they're not as unsafe as most people think.

Sent from my cm_tenderloin
 
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