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Discussion Starter #1
You may laugh but just up until Monday I found out the AP Royal Oak was only 50m of water resistants. I've always thought in order for a watch to be considered
A sports watch it needs or has to be a minimum of at least 100m?

Nautilus 120m = 393ft
VC Overseas 150m = 492ft
Omega AT 150m = 492ft
IWC Ingenieur =120m? 393ft
Royal Oak 50m =164ft
Blancpain Aqualung 100m = 328ft

So wouldn't this make the AP Royal Oak a dress/casual Watch instead of a Sports Watch?
 

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While I agree with the fact that the RO is not exactly the sportiest watch of its category, I would put it mostly on the account of the polished surfaces that make it so easy to scratch. It is such an elegant piece that I don't really consider it a sports watch.
However, the 50m water resistant is plenty for anyone who isn't going to actually scuba dive with it.

It handles snorkeling easily, and just like IWC pilot watches or the Omega Speedmaster at 6 bar and 5 bar respectively, you can swim and snorkel just fine with a RO. 100m is overkill for swimming, and the most important factor to take into account is the last service/pressure test/impermeability check. According to the big brands, most watches brought to service for water damage are actually divers which haven't been checked/serviced recently, as people assume they will be fine under water.

As long as it's a watch from a respected high end manufacturer, you can trust the WR rating, they generally test them with a 15% to 20% safety margin.
 

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You may laugh but just up until Monday I found out the AP Royal Oak was only 50m of water resistants. I've always thought in order for a watch to be considered
A sports watch it needs or has to be a minimum of at least 100m
?

Nautilus 120m = 393ft
VC Overseas 150m = 492ft
Omega AT 150m = 492ft
IWC Ingenieur =120m? 393ft
Royal Oak 50m =164ft
Blancpain Aqualung 100m = 328ft

So wouldn't this make the AP Royal Oak a dress/casual Watch instead of a Sports Watch?
Why would you think this, when was the last time you swam deeper than 164ft deep? Either way, the Royal Oak is a 'Sporty' watch, not a 'sports' watch, just like the Nautilus. They both house semi-delicate movements that can't handle true sports shocks but either watch is fine for swimming or daily life in a sporty looking package, if you want a real sports watch then get a Rolex.
 

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A watch for a sportsman and a watch meant to be worn whilst sporting are possibly different things.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Why would you think this, when was the last time you swam deeper than 164ft deep? Either way, the Royal Oak is a 'Sporty' watch, not a 'sports' watch, just like the Nautilus. They both house semi-delicate movements that can't handle true sports shocks but either watch is fine for swimming or daily life in a sporty looking package, if you want a real sports watch then get a Rolex.
Good points but whenever I hear sports luxury watch/s I usually hear Ap or Patek.
 

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Think “Sports” as in “Sports Jacket” not “Sports athletics”.

They were meant to be more casual watches of the 70s and 80s for the elite as opposed to gold cased dress watches. So they were tougher, steel, and had “extra” WR. But they were not mean to be rugged outdoor tough watches like the Submariner or FF.

They served their purpose well and although initially unpopular, grew in demand.
 

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100m is overkill for swimming, and the most important factor to take into account is the last service/pressure test/impermeability check. According to the big brands, most watches brought to service for water damage are actually divers which haven't been checked/serviced recently, as people assume they will be fine under water.
A little bit derailing from the topic, but this is something I find misleading on watch manufacturers' part. I have a Planet Ocean, which is a pure dive watch, rated to 600m. And I do scuba diving. However, I was never able to use it while diving because of this thing you mentioned.

If they manufacture a dive watch, and if the service interval is 7-10 years, then that watch should be used underwater for the whole of that time interval. But, a lot of people recommend getting it pressure checked everytime going diving. Well, then am I going to have to get it checked every year, since I do a bunch of dives each year? It is just inconvenient, costly and defeats the purpose of a dive watch.

I really like the dive watch styling and I wanna acquire more pieces; but since I cannot use them while diving I just end up feeling duped and not buying any new ones.
 

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Think “Sports” as in “Sports Jacket” not “Sports athletics”.

They were meant to be more casual watches of the 70s and 80s for the elite as opposed to gold cased dress watches. So they were tougher, steel, and had “extra” WR. But they were not mean to be rugged outdoor tough watches like the Submariner or FF.

They served their purpose well and although initially unpopular, grew in demand.
+1. Think swimming in the Alboran, off a yacht, before dinner at the Marbella club with Gianni Agnelli, not exploring the Yucatan with Cousteau.

A little bit derailing from the topic, but this is something I find misleading on watch manufacturers' part. I have a Planet Ocean, which is a pure dive watch, rated to 600m. And I do scuba diving. However, I was never able to use it while diving because of this thing you mentioned.

If they manufacture a dive watch, and if the service interval is 7-10 years, then that watch should be used underwater for the whole of that time interval. But, a lot of people recommend getting it pressure checked everytime going diving. Well, then am I going to have to get it checked every year, since I do a bunch of dives each year? It is just inconvenient, costly and defeats the purpose of a dive watch.

I really like the dive watch styling and I wanna acquire more pieces; but since I cannot use them while diving I just end up feeling duped and not buying any new ones.
I'm not familiar with anyone who says this but, if they do, I'd imagine its about vintage watches where seals and pitting are always at risk of changing the water resistance. Modern gaskets have service lives of roughly 20 years and, if your watch is correctly sealed and tested once, you should not need to retest until it gets serviced again. feel safe to dive with a modern PO!
 

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Think “Sports” as in “Sports Jacket” not “Sports athletics”.

They were meant to be more casual watches of the 70s and 80s for the elite as opposed to gold cased dress watches. So they were tougher, steel, and had “extra” WR. But they were not mean to be rugged outdoor tough watches like the Submariner or FF.

They served their purpose well and although initially unpopular, grew in demand.
I think that’s exactly the point. Back in the day an Omega Seamaster like this one (not my pic) would be regarded as a sport watch. The styling difference between formal and sport was subtle by today’s standards. The AP ROO makes more sense as a sport watch based on that that classic definition. Actually it could be regarding as avant guard relative to that definition, which is probably part of its original appeal.

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Why? The only requirement for a watch to be a sports watch is what the marketing department labels it.
I usually see it like this

No WR= Don't get wet

20-30m = Splash resistance

50m = Swiming, Washing hands etc

100m= Snorkeling, recreational diving

200m = Scuba diving

300m+ = Deep Sea diving
 

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Most, if not all brands and watchmakers, recommend pressure testing prior to diving. Gaskets last until they fail... whether due to lacking lubricants, premature decay, a 'small' impact causing the gasket to slip or deform. While these issues are rare, when they happen and one submerses their (pricey) timepiece, the repair is far worse than a quick pressure test....which are inexpensive or free.
 

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You may laugh but just up until Monday I found out the AP Royal Oak was only 50m of water resistants. I've always thought in order for a watch to be considered
A sports watch it needs or has to be a minimum of at least 100m?

Nautilus 120m = 393ft
VC Overseas 150m = 492ft
Omega AT 150m = 492ft
IWC Ingenieur =120m? 393ft
Royal Oak 50m =164ft
Blancpain Aqualung 100m = 328ft

So wouldn't this make the AP Royal Oak a dress/casual Watch instead of a Sports Watch?
It's a gentleman's sports watch.
 

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I usually see it like this

No WR= Don't get wet

20-30m = Splash resistance

50m = Swiming, Washing hands etc

100m= Snorkeling, recreational diving

200m = Scuba diving

300m+ = Deep Sea diving
Oh, of course.

But if I make a 30m watch and call it a sports watch, who’s stopping me?
 

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I usually see it like this

No WR= Don't get wet

20-30m = Splash resistance

50m = Swiming, Washing hands etc

100m= Snorkeling, recreational diving

200m = Scuba diving

300m+ = Deep Sea diving
That is the rule of thumb a lot of brands and WIS live by. Generally, I think it underplays the true water resistance that modern watches have. If you have a modern diver you should not be afraid to dive. Get it pressure tested to ensure its sealed each time after its serviced and then you should be good to go until the next service.
 

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Good points but whenever I hear sports luxury watch/s I usually hear Ap or Patek.
That’s because Rolex (or below like Omega etc) are only sports or professional sports watches, and not luxury watches. Then when you add the factor of luxury to watch, but want it sporty (not professional), you need to step up to AP, VC or Pateks.


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That’s because Rolex (or below like Omega etc) are only sports or professional sports watches, and not luxury watches. Then when you add the factor of luxury to watch, but want it sporty (not professional), you need to step up to AP, VC or Pateks.


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Actually, "luxury" is very often assigned to Rolex, Omega, JLC, Breitling, etc. That's why this forum is "high end" which is more frequently AP, VC, Patek, ALS, Journe, etc. "Professional" seems pretty meaningless and randomly used.
 

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That’s because Rolex (or below like Omega etc) are only sports or professional sports watches, and not luxury watches. Then when you add the factor of luxury to watch, but want it sporty (not professional), you need to step up to AP, VC or Pateks.


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So a $40k white gold Sky-Dweller isn’t a luxury watch? That’s rich.
 

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I think the sports jacket analogy nails it.. it’s a sports watch because it looks like a sports watch just as a sports jacket is a sports jacket because of its looks rather than it’s performance in sporting activities. Hence it’s merely a descriptor of a certain aesthetic. To me this represents any watch on a metal bracelet which is not a true tool watch . It could range from a Datejust to Cartier Santos.


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