WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I just made a deal here in the sales forum and got an Orient Mako. This will be my first mechanical watch in ages. I'm curious, as I plan to use this watch as an everyday watch/beater for a VERY long time. On a lower-end entry level movement like the one in the Orient, for how long can I expect it to keep decent time without a service? I've heard of watches like Rolex's and Omega's lasting a full 50+ years without one, but those are generally higher quality more complicated movements. I'm asking for a lower end Japanese automatic movement. I'm think maybe 15 years max before it starts gaining and loosing a dramatic amount of time daily. What do you say?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,244 Posts
It is rare if a movement, it does not matter who made it, functions for decades writhout needing a service. If you wait unill it starts misbehaving grossly, you are risking doing serious damage to the movement.
The recommendation is somewhere between 5 and 10 years.
I do not think it matters much who made the movement, as long as it is fully jewelled, and it was properly lubricated from the factory.
Many of the heaper watches were thrown away not because they broke, but becausecthey were seen as "cheap junk".
Most people know the Omega and Rolex brands, and knowvthey are fairly expensive, so they were not thrown away.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lvt and CitizenM

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
So I just made a deal here in the sales forum and got an Orient Mako. This will be my first mechanical watch in ages. I'm curious, as I plan to use this watch as an everyday watch/beater for a VERY long time. On a lower-end entry level movement like the one in the Orient, for how long can I expect it to keep decent time without a service? I've heard of watches like Rolex's and Omega's lasting a full 50+ years without one, but those are generally higher quality more complicated movements. I'm asking for a lower end Japanese automatic movement. I'm think maybe 15 years max before it starts gaining and loosing a dramatic amount of time daily. What do you say?
More complicated movements will probably require MORE maintenance...

As for the Orient, similar to what Janne estimated, I'll be happy to get 10 yrs of service out of my Blue and Yellow Mako.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,244 Posts
I fid not mean 5 to 10 years lifespan, I mean time between servicing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,271 Posts
So I just made a deal here in the sales forum and got an Orient Mako. This will be my first mechanical watch in ages. I'm curious, as I plan to use this watch as an everyday watch/beater for a VERY long time. On a lower-end entry level movement like the one in the Orient, for how long can I expect it to keep decent time without a service? I've heard of watches like Rolex's and Omega's lasting a full 50+ years without one, but those are generally higher quality more complicated movements. I'm asking for a lower end Japanese automatic movement. I'm think maybe 15 years max before it starts gaining and loosing a dramatic amount of time daily. What do you say?
10 Although it can last 15+ years without giving signs of it being out range of normal operation, because of the nature of mechanical watches, I would never actually expect 15+ years etc...I would just be hopeful....especially if it is a pre-owned watch.

There is a recent thread where many posters mention their not so expensive (seiko etc) mechanical that has lasted them 20+ 30+ 40+ years without any kind of servicing. I have a few 40+ year old, lower cost mechanicals, never serviced, with no signs of any issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,228 Posts
I'm a little unclear on what the OP is interested in. Like, low-end Japanese movements specifically, thus excluding 1960s Grand Seikos and so on?

I'm only really familiar with the King Seiko and Grand Seiko movements of the day. They seem to be doing well.

I'm wearing a pin lever Timex from the 1960s that's never been serviced right now. It gains 2 minutes a day, but I guess that's not bad for $10 watch with 0 jewels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,427 Posts
I own an Orient (King Diver). Bought it new in 1977. First service in 2011. It ran fine; the only reason I had it serviced is posts here on WUS got me thinking I was grinding the movement into atoms by not having it serviced (and rightly so).
Is it possible to run a mechanical watch for 3, 4, or 5 decades without service? Yes.
Is it recommended? No.


~Sherry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
i'm hoping its 10-15 years as I at most wear each watch only once every two weeks during the rotation...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,187 Posts
I guess the Q is a 100 mako (or mako xl) essentially disposable.. or what would a service cost..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,244 Posts
Until it breaks.
Which on an Automatic should be the Rotor bearings. Of course, there are different techs. nand qualities.
Steel bearings - need lubrication, without that they self destruct fairly rapidly.
Ceramic ball bearings - lasts longer, but you find those only on a few high end watches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Well my Seamaster Auto has just died on me after 12 years.
Was fine up until a couple of weeks ago. I was told it simply needs a service (something it's never had), but Janne's first reply above now has me slightly concerned that I've left it too long...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,472 Posts
A lesson painfully learned, take heed those from that, 'other school'.
Well my Seamaster Auto has just died on me after 12 years.
Was fine up until a couple of weeks ago. I was told it simply needs a service (something it's never had), but Janne's first reply above now has me slightly concerned that I've left it too long...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,244 Posts
Well my Seamaster Auto has just died on me after 12 years.
Was fine up until a couple of weeks ago. I was told it simply needs a service (something it's never had), but Janne's first reply above now has me slightly concerned that I've left it too long...
So it just stopped. It can just be a small piece of dirt between two cogs. Or a totally worn out pinion.

Your friendly watchmaker will tell! Bet you it is not so serious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,228 Posts
So it just stopped. It can just be a small piece of dirt between two cogs. Or a totally worn out pinion.

Your friendly watchmaker will tell! Bet you it is not so serious.
True, and on top of that, it's not like the damaged parts are irreplaceable. It might cost you, but you'll be ok.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,888 Posts
Heh, I know Doc, I only used the word "lifespan" because I'm not sure I'd spend the money to service a $100 watch in 10 yrs. ;-)

We ideally need to hear from a member who was given an affordable watch from their son saving his pocket-money to give him as a birthday present in the '50s and who would never have it anything other than running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,121 Posts
...I've heard of watches like Rolex's and Omega's lasting a full 50+ years without one, but those are generally higher quality more complicated movements. ...
Wow... if you ever really come across such piece, do give the GUINESS World Record a call for nomination!

Like cars and other mechanical stuff, watch movements will need to pay a visit to the "Watch Doctor" eventually as well... perhaps not full servicing, but minor lubrication will do. It's just a matter of time. Need not to be specifically 5yrs period or 10... some watches, will need to be serviced once in 15yrs.
Be it Japanese, SWISS or even Chinese, all mechanicals won't last, un-serviced, that long.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top