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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wonder how long we can keep our Seiko automatic watches in a "non-running" state before it is damaged by lack of activity? :-s

What I mean is that the movement has stopped and the watch is just kept in storage. Will it be damaged if we keep it like this? How long do you think it will take before damage occurs? :roll:

Thanks in advance for your kind replies. |>

Cheers.
 

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I'm no expert, so I'd defer to the watchmakers (and even the wannabe watchmakers) on this one, but here's my two cents:

I can't see why leaving a watch in an inactive state would cause any wear and tear to the parts. After all, parts that aren't running aren't wearing out.

Lubricants are a different story, though. I would guess that if you left a watch sitting for the entire duration of its normal service interval, you'd want to have it serviced before you used it again to ensure proper lubrication of all the moving parts.

For what it's worth, I bought my one Seiko automatic earlier this year and it has a 2005 serial number. It runs perfectly normally despite having presumably spent the better part of the past two years in an inactive state.
 

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I kept my square case 5606 dress watch in the back of a drawer for the better part of the 90s (either to protect if from the Clinton years, or to see if it was tough enough to handle the Bush years, but I digress) and when I finally pulled it out, it started ticking immediately. I still haven't sent it in for service or lubrication, ever, and I've had it since new from circa 1979.

It keeps accurate time.
 

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I'm no expert, so I'd defer to the watchmakers (and even the wannabe watchmakers) on this one, but here's my two cents:

I can't see why leaving a watch in an inactive state would cause any wear and tear to the parts. After all, parts that aren't running aren't wearing out.

Lubricants are a different story, though. I would guess that if you left a watch sitting for the entire duration of its normal service interval, you'd want to have it serviced before you used it again to ensure proper lubrication of all the moving parts.

For what it's worth, I bought my one Seiko automatic earlier this year and it has a 2005 serial number. It runs perfectly normally despite having presumably spent the better part of the past two years in an inactive state.
those are my thoughts also. Parts aren't going to be damaged but the lubricants may coagulate in some places and dissipate in others.
Regards Sonny
 

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I have a similar experience with one of my 6309s. The watch was made in 1980 and worn by the original owner for about 10 years. He then, put it away and didn't wear it for about 15 years until selling it to me on ebay. I bought it in 2005 after 15 years of inactivity and it started right up and ran about 15 seconds a day fast which is perfectly normal. It still runs perfectly. I did have it serviced last year and no parts were abnormally worn. It just needed lubrication and calibration. It now runs about 5 seconds a day fast which is within COSC limits. Amazing watches, these 6309s!! :-!
 

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Not a Seiko story but a story of inactivity with an automatic watch. In 1996 or so, I bought a summer place on Cape Cod. We had it for about two years and my wife at the time, was in the ivy beds, clearing out weeds. There covered by some leafy detritus and dirt was a watch. It was a solid 14k LeCoultre Master Mariner. It had a leather band which was almost all rotted off. When she picked up the watch it started ticking and kept remarkable time, and when we had it cleaned, the watchmaker said it was immaculate inside. So safe and sound and dry as your Seiko would be, i don't see any problem. BTW the LeCoultre is still in my collection and runs +/- 15 seconds a day if i wear it regularly. It is tiny and too dressy but i like it for its toughness. So store away but it is always better wear away! lol

It now has a place of honor in the first shelff of my watch collection, top row, last on the right. It has some good friends.

paul:-!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not a Seiko story but a story of inactivity with an automatic watch. In 1996 or so, I bought a summer place on Cape Cod. We had it for about two years and my wife at the time, was in the ivy beds, clearing out weeds. There covered by some leafy detritus and dirt was a watch. It was a solid 14k LeCoultre Master Mariner. It had a leather band which was almost all rotted off. When she picked up the watch it started ticking and kept remarkable time, and when we had it cleaned, the watchmaker said it was immaculate inside. So safe and sound and dry as your Seiko would be, i don't see any problem. BTW the LeCoultre is still in my collection and runs +/- 15 seconds a day if i wear it regularly. It is tiny and too dressy but i like it for its toughness. So store away but it is always better wear away! lol

It now has a place of honor in the first shelff of my watch collection, top row, last on the right. It has some good friends.

paul:-!
great story. the watch must be glad that you wife found it and gave it a place that it deserves.

:-!
 

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Well, I am glad to hear of these real life cases of watches in storage..& working well upon wearing. Hard to manage wearing them all, all the time. My watches are precious to me. Even the "beaters".
 

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Not a Seiko story but a story of inactivity with an automatic watch. In 1996 or so, I bought a summer place on Cape Cod. We had it for about two years and my wife at the time, was in the ivy beds, clearing out weeds. There covered by some leafy detritus and dirt was a watch. It was a solid 14k LeCoultre Master Mariner....
paul:-!
fantastic, buy a place and get a free watch :-!

my reply is the same as all forumers....i have a seiko 5 which i have not touched for 4-5 years, and recently, took it out, gave it a gentle shake, and voila, it started ticking. no major complaints abt it's time keeping accuracy.
 

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My preferred watchmaker says that there are really no drawbacks to leaving a watch idle, it will come to no harm. Modern lubricants are synthetic and should not thicken with inactivity.

My grandfather's 1975 Zenith had sat in a drawer for 15 years without running, started up like new when I shook it. Of course I took it for a service anyway, but the watchmaker told me that I needn't have bothered, everything was fine.
 

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I trust the movement to last, but the gaskets/water resistance may be another story after prolonged storage. I have yet to change a gasket, but perhaps someone can chime in on that. I assume that modern gaskets are not natural rubber, but storing in a hot and humid place is a bad idea in either case.
 

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It's kind of cool when 8 year old threads get revived when the vets are hungrily awaiting new content on the board!

About storage, i don't know if it helps but when i get those silica packets i throw them in my watch box.
 

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I start all my "sleepers" up once a month, give them a full wind (apart from the ETA 2824s) and give them a jiggle to set the self-winding rotor in action. If they have a day-date function, i cycle that through as well and change the day-date. I am not sure this is a necessary precaution but I like to do it.

If I have a quartz in storage I am inclined to pull out the crown to save the battery - not sure this is a good idea either; it might be better to keep the movement in action.
 

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I start all my "sleepers" up once a month, give them a full wind (apart from the ETA 2824s) and give them a jiggle to set the self-winding rotor in action. If they have a day-date function, i cycle that through as well and change the day-date. I am not sure this is a necessary precaution but I like to do it.

If I have a quartz in storage I am inclined to pull out the crown to save the battery - not sure this is a good idea either; it might be better to keep the movement in action.
I do the same with my autos, but just leave the quartz ones running; gotta have something available to grab and go.
 

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I trust the movement to last, but the gaskets/water resistance may be another story after prolonged storage. I have yet to change a gasket, but perhaps someone can chime in on that. I assume that modern gaskets are not natural rubber, but storing in a hot and humid place is a bad idea in either case.
Good point about the gaskets there M1k3z0r, probably worth considering. Your point about heat is also important - while synthetic lubricants may not thicken, I'd imagine that excessive heat is not ideal for keeping them in best working order. Given that I live in Scotland it's not a big consideration for me, but others in warmer climates might like to think about it..
 
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